Charge your cellphone in 30 seconds

High-school student’s super-capacitor invention could charge your phone in just 30 seconds

Eesha Khare super-capacitor

As part of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair 2013, which took place from 12 – 17 May, high-school student Eesha Khare showed off her advancements in super-capacitor technology.

Khare developed a tiny device that fits inside cell phone batteries, allowing them to fully charge within 20-30 seconds. Eesha’s invention also has potential applications for car batteries.

“The super-capacitor I have developed uses a special nano-structure, which allows for a lot greater energy per unit volume,” Khare said.

It can charge quickly, and lasts 10,000 cycles versus a regular cellphone battery which lasts around 1,000 cycles, said Khare.

Khare was one of two individuals earning the Intel Foundation Young Scientist Award. She received US$50,000 in scholarship funds.

You can see Khare’s IESF interview over on Vimeo:

Source: Intel via Mashable

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