Moore’s Law is dead

Moore’s law has “died at the age of 51”.

By - February 11, 2016 Share on LinkedIn
integration tech electronics chips

Moore’s law has “died at the age of 51”, according to a report by Ars Technica.

Gordon Moore, an Intel co-founder, made an observation in 1965 that the number of components in integrated circuits was doubling roughly every 12 months.

This became known as Moore’s law, which was used by the silicon chip industry as a target to be achieved.

Problems with the formulation of Moore’s law became apparent early on, stated the report.

“In 1975, Moore updated the law to have a doubling time of 24 months rather than the initial 12. Still, for three decades, simple geometric scaling enabled steady shrinks and conformed with Moore’s prediction,” said Ars Technica.

“In the 2000s, it was clear that this geometric scaling was at an end, but various technical measures were devised to keep pace of the Moore’s law curves.”

In 2016, though, it appears that Moore’s law is at an end – as the costs of making even smaller chips and the problems associated with power dissipation see the law faltering.

The use of alternative materials, quantum effects, and more exotic techniques will be required to keep up with the “easy scaling” that was seen over the recent decades, said Ars Technica.

More hardware news

These are the gaming PCs powerful enough to run Oculus Rift VR

Sony launches SSD range

Share your thoughts

Join the conversation

Connect with Us

androidappletwitterfacebookgoogleplusfeednewsletter

Poll

Do you think online gambling should be regulated in South Africa?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

More News

Political parties condemn SABC censorship

SABC logo TV screens

Political parties on Friday condemned the South African Broadcasting Corporation’s decision on limiting broadcasting of protests.

Awesome tech and gadget deals

Sale Deals

This week you can score a sweet deal if you shop at Game, Dion Wired, Makro, Loot, and Incredible Connection.

Why I left MTN

MTN shares graph

David Shapiro, deputy chairman at Sasfin Securities, explains why he is no longer an investor in MTN.

Jacob Zuma to review wives’ car benefits

Range Rover

President Jacob Zuma will be reviewing the transport benefits of his wives, and those of former presidents and deputy presidents.

X

Newsletter Subscription


Name
Email *
Enter the following to confirm your subscription *
Captcha image


Free MyBroadband Newsletter
Subscribe
×