New 5D storage offers 360TB/disc data capacity

Scientists have made a major step forward in the development of digital data storage that is capable of surviving for billions of years

By - February 16, 2016 Share on LinkedIn
5D storage

Scientists at the University of Southampton have made a major step forward in the development of digital data storage that is capable of surviving for billions of years.

Using nanostructured glass, scientists from the University’s Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC) have developed the recording and retrieval processes of five dimensional (5D) digital data by femtosecond laser writing.

The storage allows unprecedented properties including 360TB/disc data capacity, thermal stability up to 1,000°C, and virtually unlimited lifetime at room temperature (13.8 billion years at 190°C) opening a new era of eternal data archiving.

As a very stable and safe form of portable memory, the technology could be highly useful for organisations with big archives, such as national archives, museums and libraries, to preserve their information and records.

The technology was first experimentally demonstrated in 2013 when a 300kb digital copy of a text file was successfully recorded in 5D.

Now, major documents from human history such as Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), Newton’s Opticks, Magna Carta and Kings James Bible, have been saved as digital copies that could survive the human race.

A copy of the UDHR encoded to 5D data storage was recently presented to UNESCO by the ORC at the International Year of Light (IYL) closing ceremony in Mexico.

The documents were recorded using ultrafast laser, producing extremely short and intense pulses of light. The file is written in three layers of nanostructured dots separated by five micrometres (one millionth of a metre).

The self-assembled nanostructures change the way light travels through glass, modifying polarisation of light that can then be read by combination of optical microscope and a polariser, similar to that found in Polaroid sunglasses.

Coined as the ‘Superman memory crystal’, as the glass memory has been compared to the “memory crystals” used in the Superman films, the data is recorded via self-assembled nanostructures created in fused quartz.

The information encoding is realised in five dimensions: the size and orientation in addition to the three dimensional position of these nanostructures.

More on hardware

Moore’s Law is dead

These are the gaming PCs powerful enough to run Oculus Rift VR

Sony launches SSD range

Share your thoughts

Join the conversation

Connect with Us

androidappletwitterfacebookgoogleplusfeednewsletter

Poll

Do you think Brexit will benefit South Africa?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

More News

Oakbay confirms disciplinaries at ANN7

ANN7 logo

Oakbay Investments, the holding company of television station ANN7, has confirmed disciplinary proceedings at the company.

We are all living inside a computer simulation – here’s how it works

VR sex

In a recent interview, technology entrepreneur Elon Musk suggested we are living inside a computer simulation.

ANC is more powerful than ever

Jacob Zuma in Germany speaking

“We are not playing, do you hear me? We are the future of South Africa, we built South Africa,” said President Jacob Zuma at a recent ANC event.

Most reliable car brands in the world for 2016

Kia Serato

J.D. Power’s 2016 U.S. Initial Quality Study has revealed the most reliable car brands in the world.

X

Newsletter Subscription


Name
Email *
Enter the following to confirm your subscription *
Captcha image


Free MyBroadband Newsletter
Subscribe
×