Oppikoppi to stream via Google+

SA music festival to stream video of its main stages over a Google+ Hangout

By - August 7, 2012
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Oppikoppi, a popular South African music festival, will be live streaming performances on its two main stages using Google+ hangouts, the search giant announced in a press statement today (7 August 2012).

From 25 July, fans have tuned in for Hangouts on Air with some of their favourite artists, including Jack Parow, aKING and Enter Shikari.

At the festival itself, fans all over the world can tune into daily Hangout shows and watch live streams of OppiKoppi’s two main stages via the Oppikoppi Google+ Page.

Hosted by Rolling Stone Magazine’s Miles Keylock, Diane Coetzer and Anton Marshall – and joined by radio personality, Michelle Constant – the Hangouts will feature artists such as AKA, Shadowclub, BLK JKS, The KONGOS, Seether and Vusi Mahlasela.

The lineup for live-streamed shows promises about 20 hours of OppiKoppi goodness, including the complete performances of HHP, aKING, Vusi Mahlasela, and others.

Dedicated YouTube crews at the event will also record all the best performances and fan activity, Google said.

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