RIM ex-CEO Lazaridis planned to step down “for years”

One of RIMs former co-CEOs has admitted he had planned to step down from his position long before actually doing so

By - January 31, 2012
BlackBerry

Mike Lazaridis, former co-CEO and co-Chairman of BlackBerry marker Research in Motion (RIM) has mentioned in a recent interview that he had planned to step down from his role as the company’s leader for years.

Talking to The Record, Lazaridis also admitted that he had been grooming new RIM CEO Thorsten Heins for the CEO position since Heins was hired back in 2007.

Despite all of this, Lazaridis did not explain why he waited for RIM stocks to tank before he stepped down.

Despite poor share performance, Lazaridis says he plans to buy an additional $50 million in RIM stock, saying, “This company has a strong balance sheet of $1.5 billion. It has strong sales of over $5 billion a quarter. This is a strong organization with a strong global brand, an iconic product and a strong future.”

Read the full story at: Boy Genius Report.

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