Foxconn eyes 5 new Brazilian factories for Apple

Five new Brazilian factories are on the cards for component giant Foxconn

By - February 1, 2012
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With demand for Apple products higher than ever, manufacturing giant Foxconn will build five new Brazilian based factories which will produce components used in Apple products.

Secretary of Planning and Development for the State of São Paulo Julio Semeghini announced the plan earlier this week, noting that each factory would employ roughly 1000 workers.

The factories will also produce notebooks, batteries and general electronics products to be used by a variety of large electronics companies.

Foxconn officials are said to be finalising the agreement with Sao Paulo and neighbouring states. “We are awaiting the return of the executives of the Chinese New Year celebrations for taking up the negotiations,” said Semeghini.

Read the full story at: Boy Genius Report.

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