Android apps too expensive

Applications in the Android market place are too expensive, costing far more than their Apple competitors

February 24, 2012
Android men feature

Apple iPhone users may be more inclined to pay for applications than Android users, after finding out that apps on the latter are two and a half times more expensive on average.

This is according to market research firm Canalys, who released the results of a survey done across the two operating systems.

Top paid-for apps on the Android market were priced “dramatically higher” than those on iOS according to the survey results.

“In the US, to purchase the top 100 paid-for apps in the Android Market would cost $374.37 (R2871.11) – an average of $3.74 (R28.71) per app – more than 2.5 times the cost of the top 100 paid-for iPhone apps. The top 100 iPhone apps would cost $147.00 (R1,127.37), or $1.47 (R11.27) on average per app,” said Canalys.

The firm also found that 82 of the top 100 apps in the Apple App Store were priced at $0.99 (R7.59), compared to just 22 on the Android market.

Canalys found that, “Having downloaded, installed and used low-cost apps, consumers will be more willing to pay additional sums for extra content, levels or add-ons for apps they like, than to pay a greater up-front sum for an app of unknown quality.”

Read the full story at: Boy Genius Report.

Tags: Android, Apple, Canalys

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