Mozilla bans YouTube Unblocker add-on from Firefox

Sneaky behaviour has earned YouTube Unblocker the axe.

By - March 4, 2016 Share on LinkedIn
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Mozilla has banned YouTube Unblocker from its add-on library after users complained that the software appeared to be misbehaving.

Softpedia reported that Avast anti-virus caught YouTube Unblocker trying to install malware on a user’s machine.

It did this by altering the browser’s security settings through installing a new user.js configuration file.

The new configuration file disabled Firefox’s add-on signing feature, which prevents the browser from installing add-ons that haven’t been tested and signed by Mozilla.

After turning off add-on signing, YouTube Unblocker tried to install an add-on called Adblock Converter – which Avast flagged as malware.

This add-on did not appear in Firefox’s standard add-ons page, and it re-enabled itself after being disabled in Safe Mode.

Mozilla has now removed YouTube Unblocker from its add-on portal, adding that it received similar reports about the software in June 2015.

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