Neotel fibre connections grow

Neotel’s metro fibre and national fibre network rollout continues to grow; FTTX covers more than 2,000 buildings

By - March 18, 2012
Neotel broadband

Neotel’s fibre infrastructure is growing with their national, metropolitan and fibre-to-the-premise (FTTX) networks all showing improved coverage.  This is according to Imran Abbas, general manager of network Implementation at Neotel.

Abbas told MyBroadband that the Johannesburg-Durban and Johannesburg-Cape Town routes, which form part of their national fibre, are approximately 75% complete. “We plan to finish these routes mid [2012],” said Abbas.

Neotel has also completed all their metro fibre network rollouts as planned for this financial year. “We have over 6,000km of Metro fibre, mainly in Gauteng, the Cape and Durban,” said Abbas.

Neotel has always had a strong focus on providing fibre connectivity to businesses, and this initiative is gaining momentum with the company’s growing network.

“Our fibre infrastructure (FTTX) covers more than 2,000 buildings, but we have proactively already wired up over 300 buildings,” concluded Abbas.

Neotel fibre map

Neotel fibre map

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