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Thread: Geyser blankets - do they work?

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    Super Grandmaster hj2k_x's Avatar
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    Question Geyser blankets - do they work?

    Like this one here.

    Apparently, coupled with cladding of outlet and inlet pipes these things can save you nearly 30% on electricity, but just with the blanket it is meant to save 22%...For R69 this would pay for itself in the 1st month....

    Has anyone actually noticed these results when using one?

  2. #2
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    YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES!
    it works!

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    Combined with turning the geyser off during the day, we've seen around 30% savings on the electricity bill. Was a mission to get it around the geyser though

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    Quote Originally Posted by Turbo_Aspiration View Post
    Combined with turning the geyser off during the day, we've seen around 30% savings on the electricity bill. Was a mission to get it around the geyser though
    Haha, so the whole 'easy DIY' bit is a lie?

    I thought that it was established that tunring the geyser off in the day was actually counter-productive cos then the water has to be reheated which uses more electricity in the end?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Goobie View Post
    YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES!
    it works!
    What kind of savings have you noticed?

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    Quote Originally Posted by hj2k_x View Post
    What kind of savings have you noticed?
    I have a very old low pressure geyser with no build in insulation that was hot to the touch, installed the blanket a couple of years ago connected it to a geyserwise control unit and I easily save R50-R100 pm.

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    Super Grandmaster hj2k_x's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goobie View Post
    I have a very old low pressure geyser with no build in insulation that was hot to the touch, installed the blanket a couple of years ago connected it to a geyserwise control unit and I easily save R50-R100 pm.
    Cool, we have an old geyser as well - also hot to the touch. So it seems like a good idea then

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    depends on many factors. If the geyser have a lot of heat loss like older, not well insulated, unitstherewill be a saving.

    If the geyser is switched off and only sheduled to switch on once a day, in time to heat the water for the whole family to bath and still leave some hot water for breakfast and face wash and then switched off again. Due to the reduced/lack of heat loss during the off period there will me a cost saving. If the heat losses from the geyser/pipes are are very small then leaving it on will make little cost difference. If the geyser temperature is set very high, like in my case, then the losses will be much greater and therefore costs much more. I have a big familly and the 200L+ geyser need to satisfy all.
    The size of the geyser also plays a role. Its best to only heat the water volume you need so a correctly sized geyser for the family makes a difference. To heat 200L+ water when only 50-100L is required defeats the object much like boiling a full kettle of water for 1 or 2 cups of tea, so a good investment could be the instant boilers (gas or electric) at basins for hand and dishwashing and then shedule the main geyser for bath times only. Then a solar geyser also comes to mind. Geysers, stoves, ovens, kettles and irons are the real gazz guzzlers so working the savings around those would save a lot fortheextended families.

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    Super Grandmaster hj2k_x's Avatar
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    Also, it seems my geyser is not as hot to the touch as I thought - I take it that means it's quite well insulated then?

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    Super Grandmaster lcbxx's Avatar
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    Well, we've just came out of a 36-hour blackout and me and the wife both had a shower last night and the geyser was still warm (about 34-degrees) at 18:00 tonight before the power came back. I was around 4-6 degrees during the nighttime and around 20-24 degrees during the day over the 36-hours.

    Our geyser sits at its default 65-degrees and has a foil-air blanket I managed to score when they installed them at the mine-hostels over here. They were sold by the contractor that installed them for R180 each (excl. fitment). I'm not sure whether that R65 Makro-jobbie will do the same job, though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lcbxx View Post
    Well, we've just came out of a 36-hour blackout and me and the wife both had a shower last night and the geyser was still warm (about 34-degrees) at 18:00 tonight before the power came back. I was around 4-6 degrees during the nighttime and around 20-24 degrees during the day over the 36-hours.

    Our geyser sits at its default 65-degrees and has a foil-air blanket I managed to score when they installed them at the mine-hostels over here. They were sold by the contractor that installed them for R180 each (excl. fitment). I'm not sure whether that R65 Makro-jobbie will do the same job, though.
    Indeed, I am having some serious second thoughts. Also, our geyser seems to be almost flush with the wall - no idea how I'd even get a blanket around it...

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    Super Grandmaster lcbxx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj2k_x View Post
    Indeed, I am having some serious second thoughts. Also, our geyser seems to be almost flush with the wall - no idea how I'd even get a blanket around it...
    Well to me a blanket with heat-insulating properties like foil etc. will be better than a material blanket. Saying that, the standard insulation around a geyser is a type of fibre-ish material. Perhaps you should Google some reviews (if available) for material-type blankets. I'll be worried about gimmicky products since there was a rather big hype around blankets a while back. I'd trust Makro a bit since they won't generally sell crap...they sell Homemark/Verimark though...lol.

    Ours sits on its lonesome in a pan inside the roof. I got heavy the mo3r in installing it, since one has to cut all kinds of gaps and heck knowa what else to get it to fit around all the geyser mountings. Took about about and hour to fit the whole thing. The geyser looked like a space satellite afterward!
    Last edited by lcbxx; 10-05-2009 at 08:07 PM.

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    Solar geyser works like a bomb
    Its not rape if you shout surprise

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    Quote Originally Posted by butc8 View Post
    Solar geyser works like a bomb
    How much did it set you back?

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    Quote Originally Posted by lcbxx View Post
    Well to me a blanket with heat-insulating properties like foil etc. will be better than a material blanket...
    foil has 0 insulation properties. A good heat insulator will prevent the conduction of heat from one area (the geyser) to another area (the air surrounding the geyser). Metal foil is a perfect conductor.

    My geyser blanket is basically thick "think pink" wrapped in a thick white plastic sheet.

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