157 aboard Ethiopian Airlines flight to Nairobi involved in fatal crash

krycor

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The fascinating thing is the Trump response of tariffs in EU to curb losses from Boeing
 

Gordon_R

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The fascinating thing is the Trump response of tariffs in EU to curb losses from Boeing
Trump may be a m***n, but he knows which side his bread is buttered. The A vs B game is a dirty game...
 

ponder

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https://edition.cnn.com/2019/06/26/politics/boeing-737-max-flaw/index.html

New flaw discovered on Boeing 737 Max, sources say
A new flaw has been discovered in the computer system for the Boeing 737 Max that could push the plane downward, according to two sources familiar with the testing, an issue that is expected to further delay the aircraft's return to service.

A series of simulator flights to test new software developed by Boeing revealed the flaw, according to one of the sources.

The latest versions of Boeing's popular jet were grounded in March after two crashes -- Lion Air flight 610 and Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 -- that killed 346 people.

While the crashes remain under investigation, preliminary reports showed that a new stabilization system pushed both planes into steep nosedives from which the pilots could not recover. The issue is known in aviation vernacular as runaway stabilizer trim.

Boeing announced it could break the chain of events that led to both crashes by developing a software fix that would limit the potency of that stabilization system.

In simulator tests, government pilots discovered that a microprocessor failure could push the nose of the plane toward the ground. It is not known whether the microprocessor played a role in either crash.

When testing the potential failure of the microprocessor in the simulators, "it was difficult for the test pilots to recover in a matter of seconds," one of the sources said. "And if you can't recover in a matter of seconds, that's an unreasonable risk."

Boeing engineers are now trying to address the issue, which has led to another delay in recertifying the 737 Max.

"The safety of our airplanes is Boeing's highest priority. We are working closely with the FAA to safely return the MAX to service," Boeing said in a statement.

The sources say Boeing engineers are trying to determine if the microprocessor issue can be fixed by reprogramming software or if replacing the physical microprocessors on each 737 Max aircraft may be required.

An FAA spokesperson would not confirm the specific issue, but told CNN that "the FAA's process is designed to discover and highlight potential risks. The FAA recently found a potential risk that Boeing is required to mitigate."
More in the above link.
 

Daruk

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Think of the size of a microprocessor and the catastrophe that ensues if it fails. Pretty incredible.
 

itsme2

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"The safety of our airplanes is Boeing's highest priority," the company said in a statement.

This isn't true. Their bottom line and shareholder profits are their priority. That's what started this whole mess.
 

Sollie

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Apr 20, 2005
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Think of the size of a microprocessor and the catastrophe that ensues if it fails. Pretty incredible.
It does kind of put making a mountain out of a mole hill in a new light.
Yet we call computer controlled gadgets "sophisticated" as if that's a positive thing.
There's a reason I believe modern cars are over engineered ito electronics today. The last failures I've experienced were all sensor related, not the actual "old"-style components. It does become hairy when that sensor designed to protect your car fails right in the middle of a dangerous area. Maybe time to get an old Beetle.
 

eg2505

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It does kind of put making a mountain out of a mole hill in a new light.

There's a reason I believe modern cars are over engineered ito electronics today. The last failures I've experienced were all sensor related, not the actual "old"-style components. It does become hairy when that sensor designed to protect your car fails right in the middle of a dangerous area. Maybe time to get an old Beetle.
reason is due to profits, and planned obsolescence,
also they "Need" to sell you something, otherwise why buy another car?

symptom of society these days, profit before anything else, including safety.
 

Gordon_R

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I don't know if Boeing are finally being generous, or this is a PR stunt: https://www.bbc.com/news/business-48859463
Boeing is giving $100m (£80m) to help families affected by the two crashes of the company's 737 Max planes in Indonesia and Ethiopia.

The payment, stretching over several years, is independent of lawsuits filed in the wake of the disasters, which together killed 346 people.

The money will support education and living expenses for families and community programmes, Boeing said.
Boeing said in a statement on Wednesday that the "funds will support education, hardship and living expenses for impacted families, community programs, and economic development in impacted communities. Boeing will partner with local governments and non-profit organizations to address these needs. This initial investment will be made over multiple years."

Dennis Muilenburg, the chairman and chief executive, added: "We at Boeing are sorry for the tragic loss of lives in both of these accidents and these lives lost will continue to weigh heavily on our hearts and on our minds for years to come.

"The families and loved ones of those on board have our deepest sympathies, and we hope this initial outreach can help bring them comfort," he said.
Nomi Husain, a Texas-based lawyer representing some of the families of victims of ET 302, said Boeing's payment "doesn't come anywhere close to compensating the families for what has been taken from them".

He told the BBC's transport correspondent Tom Burridge that "some of our clients are not interested in financial compensation at this point" and that Boeing "put profit over safety to get their number-one selling plane to market".

Mr Husain has so far filed seven cases on behalf of families, with some of those lawsuits seeking damages of $276m. He estimated that about 50 lawsuits had so far been filed by victims' families.

Some families are waiting for further information about the technical causes of the crashes and how regulators cleared the 737 Max to fly before deciding on legal action, he said. But many others just want the truth, he added.
 
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