2017 Rolls-Royce Sweptail

FiestaST

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Whoa...check out this one-off RR.

When Rolls-Royce presented 103EX to the world, it invoked its coachbuilding heritage to inspire its future clientele. This Vision Vehicle envisaged a world of completely personal luxury mobility where new technologies would allow every Rolls-Royce to be designed in their owners' image, should they wish. Such a Rolls-Royce would represent the truest meaning of luxury - a personal, Bespoke motor car like no other for each individual commissioning patron.

The mere idea of a modern coachbuilt Rolls-Royce was not enough for one Rolls-Royce connoisseur however. This individual approached the marque with his own idea of a two-seat Rolls-Royce that he wanted to be created in the here and now. That motor car is here, now and is christened 'Sweptail'. In a nod to the swept-tail of certain Rolls-Royces from the 1920s, admired by the client so much, he asked Rolls-Royce to reimagine this feature on his one-off motor car.

Presenting the car to the media at the 2017 Concorso d'Eleganza at Villa d'Este, Torsten Müller-Ötvös, Chief Executive Officer, Rolls-Royce Motor Cars said, "Sweptail is a truly magnificent car. It exudes the romance of travel for its own sake, and immediately places 'Sweptail' in the pantheon of the world's great intercontinental tourers. Rolls-Royce's history as the world's leading coachbuilder is at the very core of its identity as the world's leading luxury brand. The arrival of 103EX shone a light on the future of Rolls-Royce in this field, and 'Sweptail' is proof, today, that Rolls-Royce is at the pinnacle of coachbuilding. We are listening carefully to our most special customers and assessing their interest in investing in similar, completely exclusive coachbuilt masterpieces. At the same time we are looking into the resources which will allow us to offer this unique service to these discerning patrons of luxury."

Through this commission, Rolls-Royce has proven once again to be the world's leading luxury goods provider.

https://www.netcarshow.com/rolls-royce/2017-sweptail/

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FiestaST

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Rolls-Royce reveals bespoke 'Sweptail' one-off

British firm open to more custom designs after revealing stunning customised 'coachbuild' machine

This is the Rolls-Royce ‘Sweptail’ – a one-off, bespoke commission that the British marque has hinted could lead to more personalised creations in future.

The highly personalised two-seater, which has been built on the aluminium spaceframe architecture of the Phantom VII Coupe, was commissioned by an unnamed Rolls-Royce customer and unveiled at the Concorso d’Eleganza historic car show, held at Villa d’Esta on Lake Como, Italy.

The owner of Sweptail worked directly with Rolls-Royce’s design department in its creation, over a period of around four years. The car, powered by the Phantom VII’s 6.75-litre V12 engine, features several unique design features, including a system that deploys a bottle of champagne at the touch of a button.

The exterior styling has been crafted with design cues to both vintage Rolls-Royce machines and luxury yachts. The Sweptail name refers to the swept-tail design of 1930s Rolls-Royce motors.

While Sweptail is a one-off design, it harks back to Rollys-Royce’s ‘coachbuild’ past – when it made bespoke luxury cars off a base platform – and could be followed by more unique creations.

Torsten Müller-Otvös, the CEO of Rolls-Royce, said: “Sweptail is proof that Rolls-Royce is at the pinnacle of coachbuilding. We are listening carefully to our most special customers and assessing their interest in investing in similar, completely exclusive coachbuilt masterpieces.

“At the same time we are looking into the resources which will allow us to offer this unique service to these discerning patrons of luxury.”

How Rolls-Royce Sweptail was designed

Rolls-Royce was approached by one of its regular customers, described as a “connoisseur and collector of distinctive one-off items including super-yachts and private aircraft”, in 2013 about building a one-off luxury car.

That customer worked directly with the firm’s design department, which is led by Giles Taylor, the brand’s director of design.

“Sweptail is the automotive equivalent of Haute Couture,” said Taylor. “It is a Rolls-Royce designed and hand-tailored to fit a specific customer.”

The price of Sweptail was not disclosed (perhaps predictably).

Rolls-Royce Sweptail exterior design

The front of Sweptail features the traditional Rolls-Royce front grille, although it is the largest version ever constructed. The grille is milled from solid aluminium and polished by hand to a mirror finish.

The rear of the car is tapered with a raked stern, a design nod intended to evoke racing yachts. The rear brake light is housed in a ‘bullet-tip’.

At the side, the bodywork has been designed to wrap under the car with no visible boundary, which is designed to mimic the hull of a yacht.

The most notable exterior feature is the large panoramic glass roof, which Rolls-Royce says is one of the largest and most complex ever produced for a car.

Inside the Rolls-Royce Sweptail

The interior is Sweptail was designed to be clean and minimalist. The customer chose a two-seater, according to Rolls-Royce, to exude “the romance of travel for its own sake”, and place the car “in the grand pantheon of the world’s great intercontinental tourers.”

Rolls-Royce has kept controls to a minimum on the dashboard, with only control on the dashboard. The clock is embedded into the fascia, with the hour marks for that, along with the faces, numbers and hands on the instrument dials, machined from titanium.

Much of the interior trim is crafted from Macassar Ebony and Paldao wood, with Moccassin and Dark Spice leather trim on the seats, armrests and dashboard top.

In place of the rear seats is a vast expanse of wood that has been crafted into a mid-shelf with an illuminated glass lip. There is also a hat shelf, which sits under the rear opening backlight.

Hidden features of the Rolls-Royce Sweptail

Not all of the custom design touches of Sweptail are visible.

Concealed on either side of the car are two identical panniers, which house bespoke-made attaché leather-wrapped carbon-fibre cases (sized to exactly house the owner’s laptop).

Those cases match a luggage set produced by Rolls-Royce Bespoke, which fits in the car’s wood-clad trunk.

Perhaps the most outlandish feature of Sweptail is concealed in the centre console: a mechanism that reveals a bottle of champagne along with two crystal flutes. The sytem is designed to deploy the bottle – which is the client’s favourite vintage, the year of his birth – to the “perfect position” for him to pick up.

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/rolls-royce-reveals-bespoke-sweptail-one

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TheChamp

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Feb 26, 2011
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The glass view and the interior are fine in true RR style, the sweptail though, aikhona...
 

JJCT

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Mar 27, 2015
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The glass view and the interior are fine in true RR style, the sweptail though, aikhona...
Maybe a shorter wheelbase would make it look better but then it defeats the purpose of a Roller. Not many cars have the aerial view as their best best angle.
 

FiestaST

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Rolls-Royce evaluating options for more one-off 'coachbuilds'

One-off projects 'a logical path' for British marque, but customer involvement likely to be more limited than ‘Sweptail’ commission

Rolls-Royce’s director of design says that company could make more one-off ‘coachbuild’ specials in the future – but says a customer is unlikely to ever again be as involved in the design of a car as they were with the bespoke Sweptail machine.

Revealed at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Esta in Lake Como, Italy on Saturday, Sweptail is a bespoke design based on a heavily reworked Phantom VII coupe. It was developed over the course of four years between an unnamed Rolls-Royce customer and the British firm’s design department – and Rolls-Royce CEO Torsten Müller-Otvös believes it may be the most expensive new car ever sold.

While Rolls-Royce has long offered a Bespoke service, Sweptail was the first time the firm had heavily reworked the exterior appearance of the car, as well as incorporating unique interior features.

The machine echoes back to the coachbuild Rolls-Royce machines of the 1940s, when bespoke cars were constructed on a base platform.

Asked whether the development process of Sweptail would be repeated Giles Taylor, Rolls-Royce’s director of design, told Autocar: “We will probably never repeat the level of involvement we had with a customer for this car ever again, not because we don’t want to, but because it’s always fraught with risk that someone may misinterpret the end goal. It’s a risk you might end up with something that doesn’t fit the brand, or suit the customer.

“We may pro-actively offer coachbuild cars in the future, where we create the project and then sell the one-off nature to a customer. That’s an idea, not a plan, but it’s something we could do.”

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/rolls-royce-evaluating-options-more-one-coachbuilds
 

Pox

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Sep 13, 2005
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You have got to admire how Rolls-Royce can ignore all global vehicle design trends and just stick to their own plans. Hideous as they may be.

Didn't think it was possible for the front of a Rolls to look worse...but they pulled it off. And that dash......
 

MickZA

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Didn't think it was possible for the front of a Rolls to look worse...but they pulled it off. And that dash......
Hideous for sure but don't blame Rolls they only served up what the client wanted.
 

FiestaST

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Rolls-Royce Sweptail: most expensive new car ever?

The one-off Rolls-Royce Sweptail was unveiled at the Concorso d’Eleganza at Villa d’Este at the weekend, with reports suggesting it may just be the most expensive new car … ever.

The coachbuilt vehicle was commissioned by a “Rolls-Royce connoisseur”, who approached the marque back in 2013 with his own idea of a two-seat Rolls. Once it was completed, it was christened “Sweptail” in a nod to the swept-tail features of certain Rolls-Royces from the 1920s.

Torsten Müller-Ötvös, chief executive officer at Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, described the Sweptail as “a truly magnificent car”.

“‘Sweptail’ is proof, today, that Rolls-Royce is at the pinnacle of coachbuilding. We are listening carefully to our most special customers and assessing their interest in investing in similar, completely exclusive coachbuilt masterpieces. At the same time we are looking into the resources which will allow us to offer this unique service to these discerning patrons of luxury,” he said.

So, how much did the client pay? Well, various reports suggest the Sweptail cost a whopping £10-million (about R165-million), with Müller-Ötvös confirming that the bespoke vehicle was “probably the most expensive new car ever”…

http://www.carmag.co.za/news_post/rolls-royce-sweptail-most-expensive-new-car-ever/
 

FiestaST

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Is this the world's most expensive new car?
This is not an existing Rolls-Royce model with special features added by the Bespoke division at Goodwood, nor is it a show car.

This is a unique coachbuilt two seater designed by and for a customer who also collects classic yachts and vintage aircraft (yes – he is very, very wealthy) as a modern interpretation of the flamboyant streamlined bodies fitted to Rolls-Royce chassis in the 1920s and 30s by iconic coachbuilders such as Jonckheere, Park Ward and Gurney Nutting, with more than a nod to the exquisitely fashioned boat-tailed roadsters of the day, most notably the Hispano-Suiza H6 Torpedo bodied entirely in tulipwood for liquor magnate Andre Dubonnet by the Nieuport aircraft company in 1924.

He brought his ideas to Rolls-Royce as long ago as 2013, where he and design director Giles Taylor quickly developed an understanding of what the customer was asking for – a two-seat coupé with a long, sweeping all-glass roof over a boat-tail rear deck; a contradiction in terms, if you will, but a strikingly dramatic one.

Over the next four years Taylor and his team joined in what became an intellectual journey, bringing the customer’s distinct vision to life - and the result of this one-off coachbuild project is the completely unique Rolls-Royce Sweptail.

The classic upright front treatment is centred on the largest grille on any modern-era Rolls-Royce – but instead of being fabricated by hand from nickel-silver sheet (which is why no two are ever exactly identical) the Sweptail grille was carved out of a single huge block of aluminium alloy and hand-polished to a mirror finish.

Then, in perhaps the most contentious design element on the car, a brushed-aluminium frame was added to the front treatment in place of a conventional bumper.

The rather American-looking profile echoes the ‘streamline’ sedans of the 1930s, with the most dramatically stretched but still beautifully understated C pillar we’ve ever seen - even were the rest of the care absolutely standard, that C pillar would still guarantee the Sweptail a place in any museum of design.

Instead of melding into the boot-lid edge like the roof of a Jaguar E-Type or the perfectly balanced Aston Martin DB5, the sweeping roofline extends past the edge of the body, tapering inwards at the same time to create a raked stern inspired by the iconic racing yachts of the 1920s – and the rear bodywork also curves in under the car with no visible corners or seams, again echoing the sleek perfection of a classic sailboat.

And, of course, no car crafted to this standard would be sullied by anything so crass as a number plate; the Sweptail’s registration number – 08 – is carved into the lower pedestal of the grille and exactly reproduced in two individual digits milled from solid aluminium, hand polished and mounted on the boot lid below the third brake light.

But the most dramatic feature of this care is the one specifically requested by the customer – a one-piece glass roof, one of the biggest and most complex on any car, framed by polished aluminium rails.

Travelling in style Having just two seats in a car of this size immediately places the Sweptail among the true Grand Tourers, along with the Hispano-Suiza H6, the Duesenberg SJ and the unique Delahaye 175 S bodied by French coachbuilder Saoutchik in 1949 for an extravagant English knight and later given to a 17-year-old Diana Dors.

The interior, however, is a masterpiece of minimalism, set in rare and beautiful materials; it’s finished in polished macassar ebony and open-pore paldao wood veneer, trimmed in beige and ivory leather.

As in the boat-tailed roadsters of the 1920s, the entire area behind the seats is panelled in wood, forming a mid-shelf with an illuminated glass lip, and a hat shelf with polished rails that extends right down to the end of the roofline, accessed through a separate, opening rear window.

The cockpit area is outlined by a teardrop-shaped rim called a passarelle, which is also the only place where you’ll find the car’s name.

The macassar ebony dashboard is the cleanest to date on any Rolls-Royce, with only one control, and the iconic dashboard clock. Its face is made of macassar veneer, to match the dashboard, but so thin that the hour marks can be backlit, so the only physical elements on the front of the clock are the hands, made by hand in titanium. The faces, numbers and pointers of the three handcrafted driving instruments are made the same way.

Concealed inside the body trim behind each door is a compartment containing a special leather-wrapped carbon-fibre case exactly made to measure for the customer’s own laptop, but the cherry on the top has to be the handmade mechanism inside the centre console chiller. At the touch of a button, it brings up two champagne flutes and a bottle of champagne, tilted to the perfect angle for the owner to pick it up.

The cost of this exercise in automotive perfection is estimated at around £10 million (R166 million) making it arguably the world's most expensive new car.

http://www.iol.co.za/motoring/latest-launches/is-this-the-worlds-most-expensive-new-car-9413448
 

FiestaST

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[video=youtube_share;_ghLG9-jPOQ]https://youtu.be/_ghLG9-jPOQ[/video]
 
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