2018 Subaru WRX & WRX STI

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
98,929
Next Subaru WRX due in 2020 as 'driver's car' with electrified powertrains

Subaru's chief designer confirmed that reaction to the Viziv Performance concept was positive

Subaru is developing its next WRX to be a driver's car that takes influence from the striking Viziv Performance concept and comes with electrified powertrains.

Company design chief Mamoru Ishii told Autocar that feedback had been good following the Viziv's reveal at the Tokyo motor show, suggesting he has confidence in leaving much of the look unchanged for the final car, which is due in 2020.

“Such a car brings lots of expectation, from within the company and from our customers,” said Ishii. “What we know is that our customers’ lifestyles are changing and we have to respond to that. The question was whether we have done that in a correct way with this concept.

“For instance, we know that autonomous and connective technology are coming, and for many customers that is great, but we don’t think that is what all of our customers want. For some, driving pleasure is still very important and that is what we are exploring.”

Ishii said initial reaction had been positive and that he was eager to see design themes such as the taut body shape offset by flourishes such as the wheel arches and bonnet scoop – elements that he considered part of Subaru’s DNA. “We have built up this tradition with the Legacy, Impreza and WRX,” he said. “We want it to look fast even when it is parked.”

Although the concept features Subaru’s boxer engine and symmetrical all-wheel drive, Ishii hinted that only the latter was critical to customers.

The car sits on the new Subaru Global Platform, which will underpin the majority of its future vehicles and can, said Ishii, incorporate other powertrains and include a plug-in hybrid set-up. He explained: “Four-wheel drive is critical to the power and performance levels our customers expect, but on the engine we have more freedom.”

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/...-due-2020-drivers-car-electrified-powertrains
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
98,929
Will Next-Generation Subaru WRX Drop Boxer Engine?

Subaru’s design chief has hinted that the next-generation WRX might not be powered by an engine featuring the brand’s signature boxer configuration.

Speaking to Autocar, the Japanese automaker’s design boss, Mamoru Ishii, said that while symmetrical all-wheel drive would almost certainly remain in the upcoming WRX, its traditional horizontally opposed engine may well go.

“Four-wheel drive is critical to the power and performance levels our customers expect, but on the engine we have more freedom,” Ishii told the British publication.

Of course, the new WRX – which is due to arrive in 2020 – will run on the latest Subaru Global Platform, which has been engineered to be compatible with plug-in hybrid powertrains.

Ishii added that the Viziv Performance concept (which interestingly does employ a boxer engine) revealed in Tokyo would serve as inspiration for the new model.

“Such a car brings lots of expectation, from within the company and from our customers. What we know is that our customers’ lifestyles are changing and we have to respond to that. The question was whether we have done that in a correct way with this concept,” he told Autocar.

“For instance, we know that autonomous and connective technology are coming, and for many customers that is great, but we don’t think that is what all of our customers want. For some, driving pleasure is still very important and that is what we are exploring.”

http://www.carmag.co.za/news_post/will-next-generation-subaru-wrx-drop-boxer-engine/
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
98,929
Wing the alarm! Subaru previews next-gen WRX STI…

Subaru has released a pair of teaser images of its new Viziv Performance STI Concept, which likely previews the Japanese brand’s next-generation WRX STI.

The fresh version of the show car (based on the Viziv Performance Concept sports sedan revealed in 2017) will be revealed at the Tokyo Motor Show later this month.

The Shibuya-based automaker says the new Subaru Viziv Performance STI Concept “embodies the brand’s vision for the future of making cars that deliver enjoyment and peace of mind to its customers”.

The STI model will apparently showcase Subaru’s “expertise on enhancing driving performance by developing exclusive exterior parts”. The brand says the new concept’s front bumper, side-sills and rear spoiler all “evoke STI’s superior aerodynamic performance”. Yes, the massive wing has been retained.

No word yet on what will power the latest concept. Late last year, though, reports suggested that the next-generation WRX might not be powered by an engine featuring the brand’s signature boxer configuration (though it would likely retain the automaker’s signature symmetrical all-wheel drive).

http://www.carmag.co.za/news_post/wing-the-alarm-subaru-previews-next-gen-wrx-sti/

E304A360-7E99-4722-B58D-CB603F12D99D.jpeg
B4BDFAAF-9FCB-4D3B-B61F-6A5500E9AC74.jpeg
 

WaxLyrical

Honorary Master
Joined
Oct 20, 2011
Messages
24,415
If they don't want to do boxers anymore, team up with Nissan and put the 3L V6 Twin Turbo Infiniti engine in here.
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
98,929
Subaru Viziv Performance STI concept shown at Tokyo Auto Salon

Following the Viziv Performance concept shown at last year's Tokyo motor show, Subaru has revealed an STI version, foreshadowing the next WRX STI

Subaru has unveiled a new concept car, the Viziv Performance STI, at the Tokyo Auto Salon, previewing the brand's intention for the future of the STI sub-brand.

The new design is a more focused version of the Viziv Performance saloon concept revealed at the Tokyo Motor Show last October, with revised bumpers and sills, some other small styling tweaks and the addition of a huge spoiler.

The original Viziv Performance was described by Subaru as a sports saloon drawing on the race and rally heritage of the Legacy, Impreza and WRX. Few technical details were released, save that it retained Subaru's traditional set-up of a boxer engine and symmetrical all-wheel drive.

This Viziv Performance STI, then, previews the next WRX STI hot hatch, which will be based on Subaru's new Global Platform and is due on sale in 2020. Subaru describes the concept as "embodying the brand's vision for the future of making cars that deliver enjoyment and peace of mind to its customers".

No technical details about the concept have been revealed, but the next WRX STI is expected to be a plug-in hybrid.

The most recent WRX STI, powered by a 305bhp 2.5-litre turbocharged boxer engine, went off sale in the UK at the end of last year.

Subaru is also displaying STI Performance versions of the Japanese-market BRZ STI Sport and Levorg STI Sport models on its stand at the Tokyo Auto Salon.

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/...erformance-sti-concept-shown-tokyo-auto-salon

Viziv Performance STI concept 1.jpg
Viziv Performance STI concept 2.jpg
Viziv Performance STI concept 3.jpg
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
98,929
[video=youtube_share;7NtfsSfrino]https://youtu.be/7NtfsSfrino[/video]
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
98,929
Leave? Nope, we’re here to stay, insists Subaru SA…

Subaru SA says it has no plans to leave South Africa.

Subaru Southern Africa has moved to assure local fans of the brand that it is “here to stay”.

In 2017, the local arm of the Japanese automaker delivered a total of 1 002 units, placing it firmly in the niche automaker category. Still, the brand says this figure represents a 10% increase in sales year-on-year.

“In a market that saw a number of automotive brands choosing to opt out of doing business in South Africa, this sales success is a testament to the brand’s entrenchment in the country,” Subaru SA said in a statement.

Morne Viviers, general manager of retail for Subaru SA, reiterated that the brand had no plans to leave South Africa.

“We’ve received a lot of scrutiny and questions from the media over our sustainability in this market given the tough economy and the recent departure of some other automotive brands,” he said.

Viviers added that – in addition to the two new dealerships opened in 2017 (in Durban North and Plumstead) – Subaru SA planned to add a further four across Gauteng in 2018 (Subaru East Rand, Subaru Silver Lakes, Subaru West Rand and Subaru South Rand).

“These new dealerships as well as our sales success should put aside any doubt that we’re here to stay and we’re here to excel at bringing ‘Confidence in Motion’ to more South Africans,” said Viviers.

Subaru SA says it will launch its updated Legacy sedan as well as the refreshed Outback in February.

http://www.carmag.co.za/news_post/leave-nope-were-here-to-stay-insists-subaru-sa/

FF2BBC35-3934-46BD-B3A5-8D925310DF9A.jpg
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
98,929
Subaru WRX STI Final Edition: Driven

Come in, STI, your time is up - PH takes one last drive in the legendary Subaru

So this is it - we're done. It came, it went away, it came back again and now, if Subaru is to be believed, the WRX STI will never again return to the UK in this format. Once the 150 Final Editions are gone, that's the fast Subaru saloon story closed in this country. Well, unless there's an Encore Edition too, but that raises unfortunate connotations with crummy Escorts, so probably not.
The passing of the Subaru Impreza Turbo - even if it's no longer known as that - is a significant milestone for the performance car, and not a good one. It's difficult to overestimate the impact of Subaru's winged wonder both at its launch and also for the lasting affect on a generation - perhaps two generations - of car enthusiasts. It's as important to boys and girls of a certain age as the first hot hatches and the 60s British sports cars, and for very good reason.

A quarter of a century ago, the Impreza Turbo redefined affordable performance. As hot hatches approached their humiliating nadir - see Golf GTI Mk3, launched in 1992 - the Subaru arrived offering four-door practicality and more than 200hp, plus the security and performance advantages of 4WD, for £20k. It simply hadn't been done before, in much the same way as the front-wheel drive hot hatch thing didn't really exist before the Golf GTI - the Impreza created its genre, an achievement very few cars can legitimately claim. It's a genre, ironically enough, that's now dominated by the Golf R, but we'll return to that point.

The Impreza's rise during the 90s was astronomic, with the WRC success, modifying culture and Gran Turismo exposure snowballing into recognition of it as perhaps the definitive affordable performance car. It was such a perfect fit for the time, like The Prodigy on four wheels: innovative, bold, perhaps a bit offensive to some. New rivals emerged, the Impreza evolved and the 20th century became the 21st, but that formidable combination of speed, value and dynamism remained compellingly attractive.

A new Impreza v. Evo twin test seemed to appear every month, with tiny tweaks that aimed to give any advantage - however small - to one side. Loyalties were as fierce as City v. United and England v. Australia - you picked your side and backed it throughout, be that in the magazine comparison, the Gran Turismo duel or a real-life purchase. It was tribal.

That the Subaru Impreza is now leaving us really does mark the end of an era, a time of 'win on Sunday, sell on Monday', of video games introducing us to entirely new cars and of Japan's proper arrival in Europe's fast car market. That's all done now, and the Impreza was a huge part of it; the STI's departure from the UK is arguably more notable than the Evo's exit a few years back, too, thanks to those early years when the Evo was import-only and, being blunt, because Brits won in Subarus and not Mitsubishis.

So what has been done with the car to mark this momentous occasion? Very little, in fact, which can be taken two ways: the first is to bemoan the lack of a true valedictory special, with 400hp and RS3-humbling performance; the second is to take this Final Edition as a representative reminder of what will disappear, with all the good and the bad that that entails.

300hp, 300lb ft and about £30k have been familiar Subaru flagship numbers for a while now, and while its rivals have since caught up with what once seemed like an outlandish output, there remains nothing like a WRX STI powertrain. Indeed there's nothing quite like the whole WRX STI driving experience, which makes its departure more galling.

There is turbo lag, sure, but then there's also that brilliant rush of acceleration when the boost comes at about 3,500rpm. There's a reward for being in the right gear - easily done with short ratios and a precise shift - that's unfamiliar to anyone used to extremely linear turbocharged cars. Sometimes that's annoying, but then nobody ever complains about lag in cars they like, do they? With that noise, the super sharp throttle response and high rev energy, the Subaru's engine is a memorable one. And again, how many memorable performance car engines are available now?

There's no getting away from the fact that Subaru rides pretty toughly at everyday speeds. The springing is fierce and the damping matches it; with frantic steering on top it can feel a little restless, truth be told. The pay off, of course, is that on the kind of road you see here the STI still feels fantastic: it can deal with whatever the roads throws at it, never flustered or losing an ounce of its composure. Relax your inputs and the steering makes more sense, too. Unlike so many new cars the Subaru needs learning to get the best from, ergo the experience is more rewarding and more satisfying.

That extends to the four-wheel drive system as well. In all honesty it would be pushing it to say that the effects of the electronic centre-diff can really be appreciated on the road; the Final Edition feels much as it always has against contemporary fast hatches, in that it relies on the driver as much as anything else to access its best side. Power too early and you'll likely get scrappy understeer; too late and there won't be any boost. Sometimes there will be a bit of fight over bumpy surfaces from the front wheels, sometimes a tad more oversteer than you expect. On the odd occasion, however, your braking will be spot on to keep the nose locked onto the apex, your throttle input will anticipate the boost perfectly and the lock is just enough to be straightened out on the power. It doesn't happen all the time, but it's fantastic when it does. Once more, it's an experience that isn't found anywhere else - more's the pity.

So while 300hp doesn't sound like a lot in 2018, there's an argument to say that it just sort of suits in a car of the Subaru's size, with this gearing, of this weight and with this much grip. In the same way that Caterham maintains about 160hp is a Seven sweet spot, and everybody agrees that the E39 is probably the best M5, there are certain mechanical combinations that just sort of work. A day in the Peaks with the Impreza will convince you that it's among them.

There's more, too. The centre-of-gravity benefits of a boxer engine may be up for debate, but having such a low bonnet - and with the A-pillars repositioned in the 2014 facelift - means forward visibility is great. The car can be placed with confidence that a Focus RS driver could only dream of. Moreover the Subaru is a nice size, and slender too; by the stats it's narrower than a regular A3 saloon, leave alone an RS3, meaning B-roads can be attacked rather than just overcome. The brakes are strong, every pedal has a faithful response and the seats clasp you well, even if they don't look like they ought to. The WRX STI might be inescapably Japanese - the language is on the filler cap, after all - but it feels as home here in rural Derbyshire as the four-legged cardigans that wander around the hills. The Impreza's suitability for a British country road, at any time and in any weather, has always been integral to its appeal, and is as enjoyable now as it's ever been.

The game has moved on though, without doubt. In the same way we thought we could live without broadband, catch-up TV and Five Guys, rivals to the Subaru have introduced features we didn't know we really wanted until they arrived. The Golf R's formidable array of talents is impossible to ignore, as is the staggering progress made by front-wheel drive since even the first 300hp Imprezas arrived. People no longer have to put with an average interior for sub-six to 60, nor mid-20s MPG for 160mph. While there's an argument to say some rivals struggle for personality against the STI, nobody can deny their abundance of talents. And while we all like to buy cars based on character and charm, the real-world implications of all-round ability can't be ignored.

Perhaps the largest problem faced by the STI in its current format is simply that the genre peaked, both in terms of buyer popularity and product desirability, a very long time ago. Even as an advocate of the current car, there's no escaping the fact that a 22B is a wilder, naughtier, feistier Impreza. The same could be said for the P1 too, as well as various JDM imports - the STI comes to the end not in the form of its life and not with the last version being the very best, which leaves an inevitable dent in its reputation.

Nevertheless, that the Final Edition can still offer up proper entertainment (in the right scenario, granted) is a testament to just how right the basic Impreza formula remains. It's a reminder of what's been gained in the past few years but also what we stand to lose as cars become yet more homogenous, refined, user friendly and capable. With that engine, that look and that four-wheel drive system, the WRX STI is a totally unmistakeable and unique motoring entity. As those qualities continue to ebb away in modern cars, they deserve to be celebrated all the more strongly here. Farewell properly then Subaru, and thanks for the memories - it's been brilliant fun.

SPECIFICATION - SUBARU WRX STI FINAL EDITION

Engine: 2,457cc flat-4 turbo
Transmission: 6-speed manual, four-wheel drive
Power (hp): 300@6,000rpm
Torque (lb ft): 300@4,200rpm
0-62mph: 5.2 sec
Top speed: 158mph
Weight: 1,534kg
MPG: 25.9mpg (NEDC combined)
CO2: 252g/km
Price: £33,995

https://www.pistonheads.com/features/ph-features/subaru-wrx-sti-final-edition-driven/37488

WRX STI 1.jpg
WRX STI 2.jpg
WRX STI 3.jpg
WRX STI 4.jpg
WRX STI 5.jpg
WRX STI 6.jpg
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
98,929
Auto Express review of the UK WRX STI Final Edition

[video=youtube_share;haoX-70tOCw]https://youtu.be/haoX-70tOCw[/video]
 

TypeRFK8

Banned
Joined
Feb 16, 2018
Messages
90
dash on Subaru's still look 90's..they need to step it up a little more when it come to compete with interiors
 

TheChamp

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 26, 2011
Messages
46,397
dash on Subaru's still look 90's..they need to step it up a little more when it come to compete with interiors

Looks very decent to me, what your gripe, that they are not going with the round vents like everyone else?
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
98,929
Farewell to a classic: driving the last Subaru WRX STi

WRC rules and tightening emissions laws have finally caught up with the WRX STi; we take the Final Edition out for a last hurrah

This is it, then. The last of the line. Extinction. The rally replica, once the backbone of Subaru’s and Mitsubishi’s ranges, is no more.

This the WRX STi Final Edition, a 150-strong run-out of models once known as the Impreza. After this: nothing. It has been a long time coming.

In 2011, Mitsubishi told me (and I reported to widespread disbelief) the Evo X would be the last of its kind, so the gradual retirement of the Subaru WRX and the Mitsubishi Evo was already in progress, even then.

Subaru withdrew from the World Rally Championship, the reason for the creation of this car and its ‘World Rally eXperimental’ initialism, at the end of 2008. And with no need for road car homologation, today became inevitable. We’ve seen, then, the birth, life and death of the rally replica during the past quarter of a century. Sure, cars as powerful as – more powerful than – this WRX STi sports saloon are still very much ‘a thing’, but there’s something unique in the way the WRX goes about its business.

And that’s what we’ve come to Scotland to witness. The roads here are clear and vast and challenging and feel like a Subaru’s natural habitat. So we’ll have one last go, to see what we’ll be losing; what we’ll be missing.

In the UK, the fast Impreza story began in 1994 when the Turbo 2000 officially went on sale, although grey imports of fast Japanese cars were already in full swing. Back then, the Turbo 2000 was a four-cylinder boxer-engined, 4.3m-long saloon with symmetrical four-wheel drive, a shonky interior and a focus on performance, and its 208bhp immediately reset boundaries about what an affordable blue-collar supercar could achieve. There have been countless models and iterations and generations and tunes and special editions in the intervening 24 years but, if you’d been blindfolded when you got out of an early car and were placed into this latest WRX STi, you’d still know you were in a fast Impreza.

Because today, well, it’s a turbocharged flat-four saloon car – longer, wider and heavier, naturally, and now with 296bhp – with symmetrical four-wheel drive. At £33,995, I still think it’s faster point to point – if that’s your thing, although it’s not necessarily mine – than just about anything else of comparable power. Or probably more power, which includes most hot hatches these days.

First, though, to Scotland and, hmm, well. What strikes you about the Final Edition, if you haven’t been in a Subaru for a while, is not necessarily the datedness of the interior. It feels a bit old hat, yes, but there’s a digital panel between the dials and another atop the dashboard to mimic performance readouts (what looks like a G-meter is, basically, a spirit level), plus there’s a large touchscreen front-row centre. So far, so much like most other cars in the sector. The fit and finish is solid, too, but the design and material selection have been left behind.

But that’s not what makes it feel dated. No, that’s down to the weight of the brake pedal, the clutch and the gearshift, which is particularly reluctant when cold, and the steering, and the enormous amount of road noise. This is a tremendously loud car. Partly, perhaps, because of the optional 19in wheels (an inch larger than standard). Damper tweaks to accommodate those wheels, uprated brakes and better control over the viscous-locking centre differential (there’s a rear one too) are this run-out model’s only mechanical changes.

Compared to hot hatches, sports saloons or even supercars, there’s a hands-on, full-of-feel, macho, workhorse physicality to the WRX. Still, what its weighty steering means is that it’s a pretty stable motorway car where, eventually, sitting in sixth gear, turning over at what are unnaturally high revs these days, it’ll clog along at 25mpg. You can turn up the stereo but a conversation is always more of a shout than a whisper. But there’s cruise control, the seats are supportive without appearing aggressively bolstered and the driving position is bang-on, with brilliantly spaced pedals. For all of its outdated feel, ergonomically it works rather well.

Still, that’s not really what the WRX is about. It’s about going to places with dire conditions and finding grip and traction where no other performance car would and, fundamentally, going from one end of a road to the other quicker than everything else. That was, after all, the point of homologating a rally car in the first place.

I do wonder if Scotland, more than anywhere else on this island, is where people still have a bigger place in their hearts for quick cars like this, where there’s nobody around to cheese off, where the weather so frequently turns poor and where driving standards, it seems to me, are high. People don’t point and shout so much if they hear an engine revving.

And the WRX’s engine does rev, like it always did. It’s a 2.5-litre these days, revving with none of the sound-augmented refinement or faux overrun pop-bang of a modern superhatch. No, it just takes abreath of air when you ask it to, then runs through with strength to the 7000rpm redline, with a fulsome, bombastic and eventually urgent attack. There’s less audible off-beat flat-four wobble than there originally was, now the exhaust lengths are more even, but it’s still, in its own way, really quite charming.

It’s old-fashioned, then, but matched to gear ratios that have been honed over the years to meet the needs of keen drivers rather than emissions regulators (this remains a 252g/km car), and there is real finesse, energy and reward to driving a WRX at anything between one- tenth and ten-tenths. With a hard but composed and controlled ride, it has that sort of intoxicating, analogue, mechanical interaction that, when all’s said and done, is part of the appeal of a sports car in the first place. Sure, it’s physical but, well, what else would you be doing?

There are not many other cars I’d rather drive in conditions like this; when the snow comes, I know exactly what all four wheels are up to, where grip and traction are and how they can be relied upon totally. Yup, I can drive cars like this all day in snow and ice without fear or hesitation to our spectacular progress.

Anyway, obviously I’m stuck. The WRX is on 245/35 Yokohama Advan Sport rubber, and sometimes even revving to the middle of third gear isn’t enough to overcome the inertia of the car’s 1534kg without the assistance of a photographer pushing down on the rear wing.

So we abandon that bit of road and find one with less weather on it, where, genuine SUV aside, there is still no car – and certainly no performance car – you’d rather be in at times like this. If you want to make progress and have fun while you’re doing it, sure, the spoilers and the lairyness and the noise and physicality are wearing and the fuel consumption is frightening, and yes, it feels out of date and will soon be out of sight and mind, but, by gum, we’re really going to miss this.

There’s something really special about this WRX, now the Mitsubishi Evo is already dead and nothing else remains that does what the Subaru does. The Ford Focus RS is closest, but even that can’t match it. Some say it’s a shadow of the Impreza’s best days, but still it’s a better driver’s car than every front-drive hot hatch and junior sports saloon, and most four-wheel-drive ones too. It has tremendous capabilities and absurd amounts of feedback. It wasn’t created to sit atop a range to flog lesser models, it wasn’t designed to look good in London, it wasn’t built for emissions regulations: it was made for conditions and roads where, sadly, too few people live to sustain it. With the death of this car, and the genre that goes with it, we are genuinely worse off for its absence.

And maybe in its dotage we’ve overlooked it. Perhaps we haven’t appreciated it enough. I’m genuinely sorry about that, and even more sorry to see it go.

COULD THE WRX RETURN?

What would it take to make a new WRX possible? A change in the world, I fear. The time has gone. The car was created to serve a purpose – because rallying demanded that car makers produced a certain number of road cars with a similar mechanical specification to the competition ones – and the WRX served it.

Today, the demands of a permanent four-wheel-drive system are troubling for efficiency, too few people want the compromises brought about by the mechanical layout and, most importantly, race and rally series don’t want to make it prohibitive for manufacturers to join in, so the homologation requirements are less. If those were to change, perhaps we’d see a new raft of specials like the WRX. But I doubt they will, so I doubt we will. Pity.

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/farewell-classic-driving-last-subaru-wrx-sti

WRX STi 1.jpg
WRX STi 2.jpg
WRX STi 3.jpg
WRX STi 4.jpg
WRX STi 5.jpg
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
98,929
Here’s why Subaru will likely axe its manual gearbox

Is the manual gearbox on the way out at Subaru?

A report out of the United Kingdom suggests that Subaru is considering killing off its manual gearbox as it increases its focus on safety.

Speaking to Auto Express, Subaru UK managing director Chris Graham expressed doubt about whether the manual gearbox was compatible with the Japanese brand’s EyeSight safety systems.

“I’m not sure if it’s compatible at all with a manual gearbox. There are certainly no rumours we’ve heard that manual will continue, or EyeSight will be [offered] with manual,” Graham told the British publication, suggesting that the Lineartronic CVT would continue to be the brand’s go-to transmission.

“My gut tells me it will be EyeSight with Lineartronic, ongoing and long-term. They want to steal the mantle of the safest car in the world. I think if they do that, then they say ‘here’s a manual without EyeSight’, they’ll just ruin that [message].

“We’ve spoken for many years about [the safety granted by] boxer engines and symmetrical all-wheel drive. We’re now talking about safety that’s not just underpinned by the chassis, but by Eyesight, boxer and symmetrical all-wheel drive.

“All these things are reinforcing the safety message. The safety message is the thing Subaru will want to take forward.”

What does that mean for the next-generation WRX STI?

“For me, an STI has to be a manual in the guise it is today. However, if you look at M-series BMWs [the majority of which feature automatic transmissions], I don’t think this is the end and I’d be very excited if they had a hybrid-petrol STI. That would be phenomenal in terms of its acceleration,” said Graham.

The automaker’s EyeSight driver assistance technology makes use of stereo cameras that scan the road ahead, prompting the system to act to mitigate or reduce the damage of collisions, with key features including adaptive cruise control, pre-collision braking, pre-collision throttle management, and vehicle lane departure and sway warning.

http://www.carmag.co.za/news_post/heres-why-subaru-will-likely-axe-its-manual-gearbox/
 
Top