2018 Suzuki Swift & Dzire (4th Generation)

Ivan Leon

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Based on customer feedback, Maruti Suzuki (in India) is now offering the optional automated manual transmission (AMT) on the top-end petrol and diesel variants of the Swift.

The Swift ZXi+ with Auto Gear Shift (AGS) is priced at Rs. 7.76 lakh while the ZDi+ costs Rs. 8.76 lakh (ex-showroom).

At launch, Maruti offered AMT on the VXi, ZXi, VDi and ZDi variants but not on the top-spec ZXi+ and ZDi+.

The top-spec Swift get features like LED projector headlamps with integrated LED DRLs, dual-tone alloy wheels, touchscreen infotainment system with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay connectivity, navigation and voice command and rear parking sensors with camera among others.

The new Swift is powered by a 1.2-litre, 4-cylinder petrol engine which makes 82 BHP @ 6,000 rpm and 113 Nm @ 4,200 rpm and a 1.3-litre, 4-cylinder diesel engine which produces 74 BHP @ 4,000 rpm and 190 Nm @ 2,000 rpm. Both engines come equipped with a 5-speed AMT.

Source: https://www.team-bhp.com/news/maruti-swift-gets-amt-option-top-variants
 

stroller

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https://auto.ndtv.com/news/maruti-s...il&utm_term=0_3b8bfe0b78-5fb99b13a0-431300629

"And now, it ha been reported that the Swift and other Maruti Suzuki models will soon get a 6-speed manual gearbox replacing the 5-speed one that has been used for quite a while."

This could mean that the driver will be shifting very frequently.

I travel at 4000rpm on the open road which requires some gear shifting when needed for overtaking or long inclines. I've mastered swopping cogs without the clutch. At first it was a bit nerve wracking but, as time goes by, I'm getting to master it.
Do I need to do it? No, but it is a lekker sensation!

A six speed box will be lots of fun.
 
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FiestaST

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Suzuki Dzire 1.2 GL (2018) Quick Review

Pricing & Warranty

The Suzuki Dzire 1.2 GL costs R177 900, which includes an impressive 5-year/200 000 km mechanical warranty and 2-year/30 000 km service plan.

Verdict

The Suzuki Dzire is a basic and simple way of getting from A to B. With its low price, generous space, and ease of use, the Dzire makes a great argument for simple motoring. Then there's Suzuki's great after-sales support and a long, comprehensive warranty thrown in to sweeten the deal. While it may lack top-end performance prowess, we can't fault the 1.2 GL's performance in and around town, where it's likely to spend most of its time. For those who want to add another vehicle into an e-hailing/ridesharing fleet and can't afford a bigger sedan, then we think the Dzire could be a worthy investment. The exceptional fuel economy is the clincher!

https://www.cars.co.za/motoring_news/suzuki-dzire-12-gl-2018-quick-review/45515

Suzuki Dzire 1.JPG Suzuki Dzire 2.JPG Suzuki Dzire 3.JPG Suzuki Dzire 4.JPG Suzuki Dzire 5.JPG Suzuki Dzire 6.JPG
 

Park@82

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Test drove the Swift today, both manual and auto.

The auto.... horrible. Leave it. No matter the speed you can feel the gear change as if somebody is taking their foot of the gas (probably exactly what these automatic manuals are doing). Wouldn't touch it.
@Hamster
This is bad news for me. And I hope you are exaggerating :p
I really, really want an auto for my daily heavy traffic (stop and go, stop and go) commute.

With the auto, one can switch it to manual mode, right? I am guessing with manual mode, one would lift your foot from the petrol and then shift? Would using it in manual mode not solve the problem?

So maybe one can use it in a combination of Automatic (heavy stop/go traffic) and Manual for the open road.
 

Sumen

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@Hamster
This is bad news for me. And I hope you are exaggerating :p
I really, really want an auto for my daily heavy traffic (stop and go, stop and go) commute.

With the auto, one can switch it to manual mode, right? I am guessing with manual mode, one would lift your foot from the petrol and then shift? Would using it in manual mode not solve the problem?

So maybe one can use it in a combination of Automatic (heavy stop/go traffic) and Manual for the open road.
The Auto in the Swift is not the normal torque converter box, it's AMT - meaning it has a clutch like a normal manual box has but depressing the clutch and changing gears is done automatically.
 

Hamster

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The Auto in the Swift is not the normal torque converter box, it's AMT - meaning it has a clutch like a normal manual box has but depressing the clutch and changing gears is done automatically.
What he said. It's not a true auto. To be fair, when I test drove the car I was trading in was an EDC and it was the first time I drove an AMT so maybe I didn't know "how" to drive it. The extra R15k-R20k for it over the manual just didn't make sense to me either, not in a little car like this.

Just go test drive the car and see if you like it.
 

Park@82

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What he said. It's not a true auto. To be fair, when I test drove the car I was trading in was an EDC and it was the first time I drove an AMT so maybe I didn't know "how" to drive it. The extra R15k-R20k for it over the manual just didn't make sense to me either, not in a little car like this.

Just go test drive the car and see if you like it.
Thank you, I'm planning on doing that. Btw you also test drive the new Figo?
 

Hamster

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Thank you, I'm planning on doing that. Btw you also test drive the new Figo?
No. It's a fugly soulless car. Was going to drive the Kia and Swift, started with Swift and that was that. Liked it too much to bother with the rest :)
 

FiestaST

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Suzuki's Dzire is a solid, affordable sedan option

The Suzuki Dzire is its own car now, just like many people insist on their Twitter profile that their thoughts are their own, meaning their stream of consciousness wasn’t mysteriously transmitted into their craniums by some sinister extraterrestrial force or the Donald Trump Administration.

Jokes aside, Suzuki has now gone through some lengths to distinguish its smallest four-door car. For starters, it no longer wears a Swift badge and although it is still closely based on its hatchback counterpart, the design is almost completely differentiated both outside and in.

Yet the fact that it now looks like a normal sedan should also improve its prospects on the market. The previous version looked like it had been abruptly cut off at the back - which is exactly what happened as the division that designed it, Maruti Suzuki, sought to keep the overall length below four metres to qualify for a tax incentive in its home market of India.

The new model still measures just short of 4m, but the boot section is better integrated than before and there’s even a bit of a mini Kizashi effect going on in the side profile... You do remember the Suzuki Kizashi right?

However the downside to bending its metal around foreign tax structures is that the boot remains relatively small, the Dzire having a capacity of just 378 litres, versus 562 in its closest rival the Toyota Etios sedan. Getting bulky items into that space could also prove a challenge thanks to the narrow boot aperture.

Inside the spacious cabin, the basic instruments and controls are shared with the Swift, but the Dzire does get a unique upper dash panel featuring triangular central air vents instead of the hatchback’s round vents. The overall design is neat, but the plastics look a little cheap and there are a few other niggles that also apply to the Swift - the car doesn’t auto-lock upon pull-off nor will it unlock when you pull the inner door handle to get out, and the spongy seats lack side support.

The Dzire has a comfortable ride, is easy to drive and even relatively entertaining, while the paltry 980kg kerb weight makes light work for the 1.2-litre normally aspirated engine, which produces 61kW and 113Nm. You certainly get decent performance by entry level standards and if driven carefully, you can keep consumption below the six litres per 100km mark.

But is the Dzire a worthwhile option in the dwindling compact sedan market? It’s a solid and comfortable car that’s also among the most affordable choices in the segment. Just make sure that boot is big enough for your luggage.

https://www.iol.co.za/motoring/road-tests/suzukis-dzire-is-a-solid-affordable-sedan-option-17212874

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Corelli

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Suzuki Swift together with the Honda Jazz are really popular in Asia. The Suzuki Baleno is their kid racer version.

However low on fuel and sporty.

Also it doesnt fall apart like a glued together ford or catches flame as easily
 

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Corelli

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With the current fuel price having a gas guzzling ford may mean you only get halfway down the drag race track till youre out of fuel haha.

The fuel efficient compact race cars may be the way to go. And yes you may save on some fines too haha
 

FiestaST

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New Suzuki Swift disappoints in Global NCAP crash test

Global NCAP has released a new crash-test result, with the fourth-generation Suzuki Swift “falling short” on safety and scoring just two stars.

The model tested was an Indian-spec Swift, built by Maruti Suzuki (which also produces the hatchback for the South African market). As with the SA-spec model, it comes standard with two airbags and Isofix child-seat anchors.

But it’s important to note the Indian version tested here does without ABS, a vital safety feature that is standard across the SA line-up (along with EBD and BA). Electronic stability control, though, is not offered in either market.

The Indian-spec Swift scored two stars for adult occupant protection and two stars for child occupant protection (as opposed to the three stars registered by the European model in an earlier Euro NCAP test). Its bodyshell was rated “unstable”.

Global NCAP says the two-star result for adult occupants was “due to high compression to the driver chest, unstable structure and poor protection for the feet explained by pedal displacement on the driver side”. The child occupant protection score of two stars, meanwhile, was explained by “the forward-facing positioning of the 18-month-old dummy in the test, offering low protection”, plus the “low protection offered to the chest of the three-year-old dummy”.

“The latest version of the Swift sold in India has improved and it is good to see dual airbags as standard. This confirms the beneficial effect of the Indian government’s new crash test regulations. But the performance of the Swift sold in Europe and Japan shows that a better safety performance is still possible so Global NCAP would like to see Maruti Suzuki aim higher,” said David Ward, Global NCAP secretary general.

http://www.carmag.co.za/news/new-suzuki-swift-disappoints-global-ncap-crash-test/


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FiestaST

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Suzuki Swift falls short in Global NCAP crash test

Suzuki’s latest-generation Swift, which was introduced to South Africa in June, fell short of expectations in its Global NCAP crash test, with an adult occupant rating of just two stars.

Global NCAP tested the Indian-made version of the Swift, which is exported to South Africa, and said the two-star rating was the result of high compression to the driver chest, an unstable structure and poor protection for the driver’s feet.

The organisation also gave the Swift two stars for child protection due to the forward facing positioning of the 18 month old dummy in the test.

Global NCAP also noted that compared to the European market version of the Swift, which achieved between three and four stars in the Euro NCAP tests depending on which option pack was fitted, the Indian-market lacks safety features, such as side and curtain airbags as well as traction control.

The Indian market Swift is fitted with dual front airbags, but there is no ABS braking - a feature that is thankfully fitted to the South African models exported from there.

“The latest version of the Swift sold in India has improved and it is good to see dual airbags as standard,” said Global NCAP Secretary General David Ward.

“This confirms the beneficial effect of the Indian Government’s new crash test regulations. But the performance of the Swift sold in Europe and Japan shows that a better safety performance is still possible so Global NCAP would like to see Maruti Suzuki aim higher.”

https://www.iol.co.za/motoring/indu...alls-short-in-global-ncap-crash-test-17399329
 

chefdude98

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Oct 31, 2017
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Suzuki does a lot of things right, but safety is not one of them.
You have to buy a euro spec Suzuki aka GLS model to get all the safety features.

I like the idea of global ncap, it will highlight safety concerns from vehicles manufactured in 3rd world countries.

Suzuki might produce safer vehicles in India. They are in partnership with Toyota in India & will be sharing platforms.

The Etios has a high safety rating for an Indian built car, so fingers crossed this trickles down to Suzuki.
 

chefdude98

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I wonder why we didn't get the euro spec Swift here as well.Maybe they will keep it to the 1.2 and then the Sport model.

The 1.2 Swifts helped Suzuki gain marketshare in SA. It is kak that we always get stuck with the cars with less safety options.
 

chefdude98

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Is the Polo Vivo tested by the Global Ncap? I am curious how a SA built vehicle compares to an Indian built model safety wise.
 
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