2018 Volkswagen Touareg (3rd Generation)

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
56,046
Volkswagen Touareg V6 TDI Luxury (2018) Review

Fast Facts

Price: R999 800 (August 2018)

  • Engine: 3.0L V6 turbodiesel
  • Gearbox: 8-speed automatic
  • Fuel economy: 7.1 L/100 km (claimed)
  • Power/Torque: 190 kW/600 Nm
Verdict

More than ever before, Volkswagen's Touareg is now a very serious challenger to the perennial favourites in the Premium SUV segment. It no longer gains a competitive edge simply because of its keen asking price, either. This is a quality product that offers excellent refinement, comfort and, if adorned with some of the optional extras such as the R-Line package and the InnoVision cockpit, also a rather large helping of the all-important (in this segment) wow factor.

https://www.cars.co.za/motoring_news/volkswagen-touareg-v6-tdi-luxury-2018-review/45464/

8CD04422-FB95-4645-9337-AFD9CF3FE389.jpegC0C03F5B-FCC1-4F24-BCC9-78CFFA357C69.jpeg5792EAAB-3C61-47AB-A415-61897958390A.jpeg8EC80D11-C5E0-49FF-9E6E-FC860AAF09C3.jpeg5CD62F1D-6071-4D7A-B311-5190E6995F3D.jpeg258765CE-5ED2-404B-A7B9-1973799A2EDB.jpeg
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
56,046
Tested: VW's new Touareg is classy and cutting edge

The Touareg - may not have the aspirational ‘sex appeal’ of the pricier Cayenne, but in terms of outright ability Volkswagen’s SUV has been able to look its Porsche cousin in the eye.

Its finesse, practicatlity and off-road skills, together with its relative value for money, has seen the Touareg notch up nearly one million sales worldwide in its first two generations.

The new third-generation Touareg sticks to much the same recipe but adds some aspirational appeal with a bolder design and some sexy new technology.

VW calls this the brand’s most sophisticated and technologically advanced SUV yet, and one is disinclined to disagree when encountering the Touareg’s new cabin. Dominating the dashboard is a new digitalised interface that looks ready for a Mars mission, and one is almost tempted to start a launch countdown before starting this vehicle up and pulling off.

Called the Innovision Cockpit, this stylish but expensive R74 900 option comprises a 30.4cm digital instrument cluster that flows into a huge 38cm central infotainment hub and almost completely does away with conventional buttons.

Along with looking like the helm of a starship, the Innovision Cockpit is user friendly; it’s fairly straightforward to use with a logical layout and large icons, and doesn’t take more driver attention off the road than necessary.

This digital deck is part of a smart new cabin with high-quality finishes, enhanced by stylish strips of mood lighting, which give the interior a plush feel that’s equal to any SUV made by Audi, BMW or Mercedes. But in the same breath, the Touareg also competes price-wise against those premium brands and it sells here in two V6 turbodiesel versions: the Luxury for R999 800 and the full-featured Executive for R1 140 200. Both are sold with a three-year/120 000km warranty and five-year/100 000 km maintenance plan.

The real party is inside but the new Touareg also has some exterior road presence with its large and intimidating grille that extends into the LED headlights. When one sees it approaching in rear-view mirrors, one is inclined to move out of the way.

VW’s large SUV shares its MLB Evo platform with other VW Group vehicles like the Bentley Bentayga, Porsche Cayenne and Audi Q7. At 4878mm long it’s slightly larger than the previous Touareg but because its body is made of lightweight aluminium and high-tech steels it’s 106kg lighter and therefore more nimble.

The Touareg offers five seats (unlike the Audi Q7 and BMW X5 which can take up to seven people), but those five enjoy heaps of space in a cabin that’s grown over the already spacious last-generation Touareg, while the boot’s swelled from 697 to a giant 810 litres.

The newcomer also boasts the largest collection of driver assistance and comfort functions yet to make their way into a VW including semi-autonomous driving features, and a thermal imaging camera that detects people and animals at night.

The lengthy standard features list on both Touareg derivatives includes a power-operated tailgate, LED headlights, electrically adjustable and climate-controlled front seats, rear view camera with park assist, electrically folding towbar, climate control, navigation, and adaptive cruise control. Also, for sunroof-loving South Africans, the new Touareg features the largest panoramic sliding roof yet created by VW.

The Executive also throws in height adjustable air suspension, Dynamic Chassis Control which allows adjusting of the suspension stiffness, a tyre pressure monitor, and four zone climate control. The Executive’s dressed up with a bolder-looking R-Line exterior and interior styling package, 20” instead of 19” alloy wheels, and LED matrix headlights.

Dipping further into the options budget gets you the Advanced Safety Package which includes Night Vision, a Head-up Display, and a lane-keeping aid. All of these driver-assist gizmos were fitted to our test vehicle and the Night Vision in particular is a brilliant piece of technology; the thermal camera ‘sees’ pedestrians and animals in the dark a lot sooner than the naked eye, and displays them on the digital screen in bright orange.

The Touareg’s initially available here as a 3-litre V6 turbodiesel with outputs of 190kW and 600Nm, and for now Volkswagen SA doesn’t have plans to introduce any of the other variants available overseas: namely the 310kW V8 turbodiesel, the 250kW V6 petrol, and the 270kW plug-in hybrid.

The V6’s power delivery is smooth and gutsy, but not entirely without some hesitation at times. There is some turbo lag in a standing start and the downshifts are a little lazy - although they’re improved when the eight speed tiptronic transmission’s in sport mode.

That said, the Touareg delivers a 7.4 second 0-100km/h time at Gauteng altitude, a pretty decent figure for such a bulky vehicle.

It’s a notably refined engine, contributing to an all-round quiet-cruising experience and a very plush ride. Our test vehicle also averaged an impressively economical 7.7 litres per 100km. While most of the world is still officially hating diesel engines, you still can’t beat them for a blend of power and economy.

As an adventure vehicle the Touareg makes the grade with its impressive offroad ability, and it’s no soft-roader consigned to just climbing shopping-mall kerbs.

With its height-adjustable air suspension, 4Motion permanent all-wheel drive, and a selection of modes to suit different terrains, the Touareg breezed through the offroad course we put it through. Its belly didn’t snag anywhere on the hilly route, and its progress wasn’t halted by axle-twisting sections where one or more of the wheels lost contact with the ground.

The Touareg Executive is also specced with four-wheel steering which boosts handling and stability at higher speeds, and reduces the turning circle at lower speeds - allowing you to thread the big vehicle through tight parking lots or 4x4 trails with fewer three-point turns.

VERDICT

A large luxury lounge on wheels that’s a master of most terrains. The appealing new technology - particularly that stylish space-age dashboard - gives the new Touareg some glamour too.

https://www.iol.co.za/motoring/road-tests/tested-vws-new-touareg-is-classy-and-cutting-edge-16824568

6DC389E6-F345-4939-9463-6FFF424D2043.jpeg58082E48-7C46-4993-8FE9-7C2A0C38EC8B.jpegAA740BCE-D583-4C15-B073-95233A264CBC.jpegE22D4DD4-F7D6-4EDD-94EC-4685C9D39753.jpegF3E4E237-7D1D-455A-98E8-B4B6275B8A7C.jpeg
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
56,046
Driving impression: Volkswagen Touareg 3.0 TDI Executive

It’s no secret that Volkswagen’s flagship SUV, the Touareg, is based on the same MLB platform as its more expensive siblings from Bentley, Lamborghini and Porsche.

We recently had the Executive model on test and while we didn’t venture off the beaten track it was pleasing to drive in the city. And let’s be frank, this is where the behemoth will spend most of its time.

What’s it powered by?

Volkswagen has decided to keep engine choice down to one while offering two trim options: Luxury and Executive.

The engine is peach. It’s a 3.0-litre turbodiesel engine producing 190kW and 600Nm, all that surge is channeled through an 8-speed automatic gearbox.

Its 600Nm are all available at a lowish 2510 r/min and translate into a claimed 0-100km/h sprint time of 6.1 seconds. It doesn’t feel as quick as the claimed figure suggests but it does feel quite rapid on pull away considering its gross weight of almost three tons.

It runs out of puff at 235km/h and during the week had it on test averaged around 9.0 litres/ 100km, which I think is phenomenal for an SUV of its size.

The engine is as creamy smooth as a freshly baked meringue. The ZF-sourced gearbox is sublime and is best left to its own devices.

There are numerous driving modes that can be accessed via the rotary controller, these include an off-road mode and modes for different surfaces (gravel, sand and snow).

At its launch in June, I drove it for a lengthy distance on gravel roads and it still felt similar to German limousines. It's simply majestic off the beaten track mostly because the all-wheel-drive system knows exactly when to distribute power to a specific tyre to make sure you're never struggling.

Off-road limousine

The Touareg benefits from sharing the same platform as the Bentley Bentayga and Lamborghini’s Urus. Yes, the luxury SUV business is proving to be profitable because the VW Group can draw on its vast resources to produce numerous models from a common platform.

The permanent four-wheel drive system powers each wheel independently rides like a sumptuous SUV.

That PL71 platform means there is space and technology to add all the trimmings. The (optional) air suspension means it rides well on roads that look like an adolescent teen. It feels like a limousine that sits 2000mm off the ground that can fit five adults with the ease of con-man.

About those trimmings…

The high-level of specification offered on local models shows how intent VW are on pushing the figurative goalposts, especially in terms of safety.
I played around with the night vision which picks up objects displays them on the screen ahead. It’ll come in handy when you’re heading to bush for the weekend and the only light you have are the stars.

Another nifty feature (dynamic light assist) that’s part of the LED light package is when it senses a pedestrian on the pavement it’ll flash an LED at the person to warn them of the approaching SUV. It’s brilliant though it gave pedestrians a helluva fright on my way home.

The innovision cockpit has a three-pronged approach to driver connectivity via the touchscreen, gesture control and voice. It’s headlined by a massive 38cm touchscreen that offers clear graphics for the driver. A heads-up display system offers the most important info and allows the driver to focus on the road.

There’s little to fault about the new Touareg, its more than 800 litre boot can swallow pretty much anything except a T-Rex. It loses out on badge snobbery to Ingolstadt’s which is surprisingly has a lower base price than the VW.

But VW’s quality is now near as makes no difference on the same level as Audi’s. The new Touareg for the most part is exceeding its sales targets.

VW South Africa told Wheels24 that their aim is to sell 60 units and in September no less than 63 were sold, in comparison Audi only sold 14 Q7s.

Price - R1 142 200

Options:

Dynaudio sound system

Ambient light package for R-Line

Cargo package

https://www.wheels24.co.za/NewModels/driving-impression-volkswagen-touareg-30-tdi-executive-20181006
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
56,046
Look how many they've sold! Volkswagen's R1-million flagship Touareg is proving to be a sterling sales success in Mzansi

There is a gluttony of premium SUVs on sale in South Africa right now, many of them are from the Volkswagen Group. The Porsche Cayenne, Audi Q7, Bentley Bentayga, Lamborghini Urus and the Volkswagen Touareg all share the same DNA via the group's MQB platform.

The benefit of having many brands under one group is that the economies of scale are lower and that turns into higher profitability

ouareg packs a premium punch

On paper, the Touareg arguably lacks the brand cachet of its cousins, however we've driven it extensively since its launch in July 2018 and confirm that it's an outstanding SUV, offering a premium cabin, great tech and sumptuous ride quality.

There are two models in the range, both use the same 3.0-litre V6 turbodiesel engine producing 190kW and 600Nm. The Luxury model is priced from R999 800 and the top-of-the-range Executive costs R1 142 200.

VW South Africa said at the launch in July that its target was to sell anbout 50 units a month; in the first full month of sales they sold 55 in August and then followed that up in September with a 14.5% increase to 63 units sold.

It's clear that despite its as-near-as-makes-no-difference R1 000 000 entry point, buyers are keen to experience the Touareg in all its glory.

https://www.wheels24.co.za/News/SA_vehicle_sales/look-how-many-theyve-sold-volkswagens-r1-million-flagship-touareg-is-proving-to-be-a-sterling-sales-success-in-mzansi-20181012

Sales.png
 

Craig

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 22, 2016
Messages
13,730
Looks very imposing on the road, saw one yesterday. You definitely notice it coming from the front.
 

ubercal

Expert Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2005
Messages
2,279
Look how many they've sold! Volkswagen's R1-million flagship Touareg is proving to be a sterling sales success in Mzansi

There is a gluttony of premium SUVs on sale in South Africa right now, many of them are from the Volkswagen Group. The Porsche Cayenne, Audi Q7, Bentley Bentayga, Lamborghini Urus and the Volkswagen Touareg all share the same DNA via the group's MQB platform.

The benefit of having many brands under one group is that the economies of scale are lower and that turns into higher profitability

ouareg packs a premium punch

On paper, the Touareg arguably lacks the brand cachet of its cousins, however we've driven it extensively since its launch in July 2018 and confirm that it's an outstanding SUV, offering a premium cabin, great tech and sumptuous ride quality.

There are two models in the range, both use the same 3.0-litre V6 turbodiesel engine producing 190kW and 600Nm. The Luxury model is priced from R999 800 and the top-of-the-range Executive costs R1 142 200.

VW South Africa said at the launch in July that its target was to sell anbout 50 units a month; in the first full month of sales they sold 55 in August and then followed that up in September with a 14.5% increase to 63 units sold.

It's clear that despite its as-near-as-makes-no-difference R1 000 000 entry point, buyers are keen to experience the Touareg in all its glory.

https://www.wheels24.co.za/News/SA_vehicle_sales/look-how-many-theyve-sold-volkswagens-r1-million-flagship-touareg-is-proving-to-be-a-sterling-sales-success-in-mzansi-20181012

View attachment 564439
shew ... the economy must be doing good
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
56,046
Used car buying guide: Volkswagen Touareg

The Mk1 Touareg offers an awful lot of SUV for the money, but you might want to think twice about buying a V10 or W12. John Evans dishes the dirt

Talk of the Volkswagen Touareg Mk1 of 2003-10 often starts with the outrageous 5.0 V10 diesel.

This sleeping giant of an SUV can, when roused, do 0-62mph in 7.5sec. Prices start at around £2000 for an early high-miler (the example we’re thinking of has done 195,000 miles, been owned for two years by the dealer selling it and, he claims, has a full service history and been maintained regardless of cost).

As a flag-waver, it certainly did its bit to get VW’s big workaday 4x4 talked about in the same breath as its more glamorous Audi Q7 and Porsche Cayenne sister cars, and even more so when ordered in uprated R50 spec.

But really it’s the lesser-known W12 version that should kick-start a Touareg chat. This limited-edition left-hooker used the 6.0-litre W12 from the VW Phaeton. Developing the same power as a Porsche Cayenne Turbo, it could hurl the 2542kg SUV from 0-62mph in 5.8sec.

A 2009-registered example with 13,000 miles was sold recently by a dealer for around £30,000. However, despite its awesome Q-car appeal, he was glad to see the back of it.

“I could see it would cost a bomb in workshop hours to service because you couldn’t get to anything without dismantling half the engine,” he told me. “I could see that the designers were so short of space, they’d had to locate the battery under one of the seats. I know this because I had to change it and doing so cost me £400.

It was a stupidly quick car, though!” So the V10 and W12 are the Kray twins of the Mk1 Touareg range. Fortunately, the rest of the family is a lot cuddlier. At the bottom of the line- up sit the popular 2.5 TDI and rarely sold 3.2 V6 petrol engines, available with manual or Tiptronic automatic transmissions. They suit easy-going drivers with a bit of towing to do (all Touaregs can tug 3500kg). If you need a little more heft, there’s the 4.2 V8 petrol auto. The better balanced 3.0 V6 TDI auto arrived in 2005, combining livelier performance with decent economy, and it and the 2.5 TDI accounted for the bulk of sales.

These and all later versions of the Touareg are four-wheel drive with a manual or automatic locking centre differential (a locking rear diff was an option) and hill descent control. The midlife facelift in 2007 heralded no less than 2300 changes, a figure that included boiling down the petrol line-up to one 3.6 V6. The 2.5 and 5.0-litre diesels soldiered on but the 3.0-litre was heavily revised, only to be tinkered with the following year when its power was raised from 221bhp to 236bhp and economy improved by some margin. If you’re shopping for a 2008-reg 3.0 TDI, make sure you check which of the two versions you’re being offered.

For its heated leather seats, satellite navigation and cruise control, SE is the pick of the trims. A clean, 100,000-mile 2008 ‘high-power’ Touareg 3.0 V6 TDI SE with full VW service history for around £5450 is just the ticket.

How to get one in your garage:

An expert’s view, BARRY BABISTER, CCM VW SPECIALISTS: “We rate the Mk1 Touareg engines. The 3.0 V6 TDI is bulletproof, with the right balance of power and economy. Check that oil and filter changes have been done on time. Oil pressure may be unaffected by poor maintenance and you won’t see the oil light flash but tired oil doesn’t penetrate the engine deeply enough. We see failed timing chain tensioners and bearings so know it’s an issue. Propshaft failure is a talking point. We have a cost-effective repair, but tremors or rumbles could just as easily be poor wheel alignment, which even for an experienced technician is difficult to resolve.”

Buyer beware:

ENGINE - A V10’s DPF light could mean a 13-hour gearbox removal to replace the sensor. On all engines, check for caramelised oil on the block caused by poor injector seating. Variable inlet manifold issues on 3.0 TDIs can trigger limp-home mode; a repair kit is £300. On the 2.5 TDI, check for water pump leaks; on the 3.0 TDI, listen for timing chain rattles. Ignition coil issues hit early petrols.

TRANSMISSION - Check for smooth operation of the auto’ box, although hesitation on V10s and V8s is normal. Check tyres for hard-to-resolve misalignment issues. On cars over 60k miles, thumping when the auto shifts from fifth to fourth could be a failing valve chest (£800 for a specialist fix).

TYRES AND BRAKES - The Touareg’s 2500kg eats discs and pads. Seized calipers and pitted discs are common. Expect just 10,000 miles from tyres. Check the electronic handbrake – repairs are expensive. On older cars with air suspension, check for corroded pipework and the vehicle sitting awkwardly. Listen for steering pump noises on full lock. Check the tyre pressure monitoring system works – it can cause endless trouble.

ELECTRICS - Battery voltage problems can spread throughout the electrics, causing instrument and airbag failures. Check everything works because diagnosis is complex and expensive.

BODY - Corrosion is rare but check for off-road damage underneath.

Also worth knowing:

On a full or trailing throttle, a grumbling noise or a hammer-like banging could be a failing propshaft bearing. It can flare up from around 50k miles. The solution used to be a new shaft but it’s now possible to have the affected parts replaced and the shaft rebuilt.

How much to spend:

£1500-£2995: High-mile 2003-05 2.5 TDIs plus a 2003 5.0 V10 with 150k miles.

£3000-£4995: 2004-07 2.5s, low-power 3.0 TDIs.

£5000-£6995: Early high-power 3.0 TDIs but mostly 06-09 2.5s and sub-100k low-power 3.0 TDIs. Some low-mile 07 3.2 petrols and early, reasonable-mile V10 diesels.

£7000-£8995: More of the same; plenty of circa-100k- mile2009-10high-power 3.0TDIs.

£9000-£11,995: Mainly 2009-10 high-power 3.0 TDIs.

£12,000 AND ABOVE: Most expensive examples topping out at £19k for a 2008 V10 R50.

One we found:

VOLKSWAGEN TOUAREG, 5.0 V10 TDI, 2005/05, 80K MILES, £6789: Full history and two owners, this cherished V10 has unmarked 20in alloys, leather seats, a sat-nav and parking sensors. Sold with a 15-month warranty but check the small print.

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/used-car-buying-guides/used-car-buying-guide-volkswagen-touareg

Touareg 1.jpgTouareg 2.jpgTouareg 3.jpgTouareg 4.jpgTouareg 5.jpg
 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
56,046
REVIEW: The new Touareg, more premium than ever - CarAdvice

 

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
56,046
ABT hands Volkswagen Touareg bigger wheels, added grunt!

The folks over at ABT Sportsline are at it again. This time, the German tuner has handed the latest Volkswagen Touareg bigger alloy wheels and – you guessed it – added power.

The latter comes courtesy of the firm’s “specially developed” engine control unit, which it says “continuously adjusts a large number of measurement data to ensure optimum power delivery”.

ABT’s fettling of the German-spec 3,0-litre TDI powerplant results in new peak outputs of 243 kW and 650 N.m, up from the standard 210 kW and 600 N.m (note that the version of this engine sold in South Africa makes 190 kW and 600 N.m).

And the wheels? Well, the company offers 22-inch ABT Sport GR alloys (in matte or glossy black) for the Wolfsburg-based automaker’s flagship SUV, plus various other design in different sizes. It says the wheels have “not an ounce of unnecessary weight and feature a strong concave rim base”.

Integrated entrance lights are also available to replace the standard items in the driver and front passenger doors, projecting the ABT logo onto the ground whenever the doors are opened.

“Since its market launch in 2002, the VW Touareg has been a regular at ABT Sportsline,” said CEO Hans-Jürgen Abt. “And the power boost and alloy wheels once again add driving pleasure and sportiness to the third generation.”

https://www.carmag.co.za/news/abt-hands-volkswagen-touareg-bigger-wheels-added-grunt/

35EC9BAC-2B7F-43DE-A881-2260F09DA02C.jpegA99E7517-0B7E-4676-A232-6754B40BFF19.jpeg322F95FD-6FC9-4B69-898B-42DCB7D6299F.jpeg
 
Top