7.5 million Adobe accounts exposed

Jamie McKane

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7.5 million Adobe accounts exposed

Adobe Inc. exposed the data of 7.5 million of its creative-software customers, a person familiar with the matter said, in the latest example of a company leaving consumer information visible on the internet.

Adobe addressed the vulnerability the same day it was discovered, Oct. 19, said the person, who asked not to be identified discussing the breach.

[Bloomberg]
 

elf_lord_ZC5

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Every one is eager to grab and store your private data, none are competent at safe guarding it.
 

Jopie Fourie

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Yeah, so it is clear that web-based systems are insecure and cannot protect personal identifiable information. Best would be for companies to accept this, force users to use fake information when registering and just ignore breaches as they happen. Just shoot out an e-Mail asking users to change passwords.
 

elf_lord_ZC5

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Companies should not be grabbing and stealing every possible bit of their customers private data, that they can lay their hands on, when they obviously are not capable of safe guarding their own data, never mind other people's data.

But yeah, the data breaches must go on till everyone's private data is public knowledge, and looses all value.
 

Jopie Fourie

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But yeah, the data breaches must go on till everyone's private data is public knowledge, and looses all value.

This is already the case. All your data is already in public hands. Not necessarily in good hands though. Your names, surnames, identity numbers, marriage certificates, divorce cases, addresses and more have been classified as public information by Home Affairs and allowed private institutions like the Mormon Church to photograph all these files and make it available online to the world.

None of this information can ever be classified as protected information by any law. So, the POPI Act has taken a dive and it will be overturned in the first case that heads to court when, and IF it ever comes into affect.

In addition to this, databases for all state agencies, sars, banks, credit bureau, cellphone companies, insurance companies, natis, deeds, pension funds, and more is already in circulation and can be bought from unscrupulous people.

Personal information literally has very little value, since all this data is easily obtainable at very low costs.

The faster people come to realize that there is no such thing as 'privacy', the better.
 

elf_lord_ZC5

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Still, tho it is easier to steal it from people who have no business collecting it in the first place, than trawling thru all the various public databases, and collecting it yourself.
 

Jopie Fourie

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Still, tho it is easier to steal it from people who have no business collecting it in the first place, than trawling thru all the various public databases, and collecting it yourself.

Not totally true, because those who have no business collecting it, tries to sell it. Not so easy getting hold of them or getting the money to buy it. To the flip side of the coin, a number of syndicates are trawling Home Affairs documents on the Mormon Church website and compile databases of millions of names, surnames, identity numbers, addresses and more.
 

elf_lord_ZC5

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Not totally true, because those who have no business collecting it, tries to sell it. Not so easy getting hold of them or getting the money to buy it. To the flip side of the coin, a number of syndicates are trawling Home Affairs documents on the Mormon Church website and compile databases of millions of names, surnames, identity numbers, addresses and more.

Need it for cross referencing - and verification - increases the value of what they already stole somewhere else.
 
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