a Narcotics Question

The Ben Man

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May 11, 2019
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Made a throw away account so I can ask a rather serious question.

I'm a recreational user of Cat or Kat or Khat as the internet calls it and methcathinone as its technically know. Now I use it once a month at least and will consume a gram or more over a number of days, occasionally I will consume large amounts for a very long period of time and will stay awake in excess of 96 hours (4 days) and have pushed it so far as a 192 hours (8 days) with no sleep. I make a conscious effort to consume sufficient fluid and eat enough to consume the kilo joules required and ensure the stuff I get is clean and not cut with all kinds of shite.

What I want to know in scientific terms if anyone knows, what are the actual damages done to one's body and more importantly the brain when not sleeping for that long as I assume they would be severe yet after more that 8 years if doing so occasionally I have not noticed any noticeable affects, I'll outline what I experience as time goes on below.

12 Hours: High Cognitive function and a desire to think and do things ensues

24 Hours: No severe effects provided you were well rested and fed before hand. High
48 Hours: Your body ceases to keep your mouth moist speech becomes impaired and loads of jaw movements and twitching becomes apparent (important to keep yourself hydrated if you value your teeth)

72 Hours: Muscle and weight loss becomes very noticeable (That's how you can go weeps 3x more than the fluid you consume) Keeping still, not fidgeting and making any movements with dexterity becomes difficult. Also by this point your wiener is the size of a cigarette filter.

96 Hours: Speech becomes incredibly difficult to start, silent stutter will be prevalent before uttering the first word. Hallucinations become prevalent (user dependent) especially in dark or difficult to see areas, things appear to move around such as shadows in the distance and objects in your peripheral, focusing your eyes are also very difficult. Heart rate goes through the roof at the slightest physical exertion. Attention to a topic or subject becomes very strange as you'll find yourself incredibly interested in even the most mundane things and your personal bullshit filter will cease operation and you'll talk the biggest pile of shite.

120 Hours: Physical coordination and dexterity becomes very difficult, cognitive function is still high but very much delusional. Your body either runs out of or stops releasing endorphins so you no longer feel as good. Severe weight and muscle mass loss is very prevalent and visible, others will comment you don'y look well and you'll be sweating bullets even in -5 degree weather. Palms and hands break out in a sort if acidic sweat which seems to eat away at your skin if its contacting anything, your feet if you have very tight shoes will be soaking wet and your ankles will have tiny little potholes like most of the Limpopo road network. Anything that requires a good amount of brain function such as a technical question at work or so becomes incredibly difficult to answer and trying to act as sober and stable as possible takes up most of your brain's processing power.

144 Hours to 192 all the above affects become severely multiplied and if you do not consume the vast amounts of the drug required at this point in time your body and brain take over, you will right in the middle of doesn't matter what you are doing enter sort of a highway hypnosis where by you are no longer present yet your body is still doing whatever it is you were doing, be it talking, working or operating some kind of machinery, you'll still do it fine but wont be coherent in your speech and you will have no memory of the events, they can be from a couple of minutes to a couple of hours. I was driving to Roodepeoort one morning and remember seeing the off ramp to the hotel I was staying at then next thing I notice is its's a hour and a half later and I had driven to Sasolburg, I watched myself driving by reviewing the dash cam footage, drove completely normal all be it a bit slow and almost never took any off ramps.

I'm sure all this has very bad effects on the brain, I'd like to figure out what they may be. Sources on the internet tend to overstate every little detail (trek die dam onder die eend se gat yt) and scientific articles don't really have any info accept for amphetamine studies from the states but those are way lower consumption figures yet the advantages are prevalent in students with regards to their studies and tests.
 

Arthur

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Your mind is the one thing that distinguishes you from the beasts. For us humans it's the primary tool for grasping reality and for ordering our lives so we can grow and flourish and discover happiness. Why ingest chemicals to mess with your mind? Damage to the body is trivial compared to damage to your mind (which is not the brain). It can only end in your ruin, and damage to those who love you and depend on you. Get your life straightened out, my friend.
 

KT-B

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OP you write all that with all the things that happen - and you still take it ?

There are plenty of sites telling you about the dangers and benefits
https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/the-science-of-sleep-understanding-what-happens-when-you-sleep

https://www.dreams.co.uk/sleep-matters-club/what-happens-to-your-body-during-8-hours-of-sleep-2/

https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/features/what-happens-to-your-body-when-you-sleep-a6675861.html

7 amazing things that happen to your body while you sleep
Wednesday 14 March 2018

Sleeping is important for our physical and mental health.

There’s a lot we don’t know about sleep. Questions like why we have sleep cycles, why we dream and why humans even need sleep in the first place are ones scientists are still finding exact answers to.
But one thing’s for certain: when we sleep, and sleep well, we feel better physically and mentally, and perform better during the day. Read on to find out some of the things we do know about sleep and why it’s so important for our bodies and minds.
1. Your brain sorts and processes the day’s information
Don’t be fooled into thinking that when you’re asleep your brain has shut off too. Your brain is actually quite busy while you sleep, sorting and storing information from the day. This process is particularly important for creating long term memories, as your brain consolidates all the information it’s picked up during the day and files it away for later use.
2. Hormones flood your body
There are a number of different hormones released during sleep, all with different purposes. Melatonin, released by the pineal gland, controls your sleep patterns. Levels increase at night time, making you feel sleepy. While you’re sleeping, your pituitary gland releases growth hormone, which helps your body to grow and repair itself.
3. Your sympathetic nervous system chills out
During sleep, your sympathetic nervous system – which controls your fight or flight response – gets a chance to relax. Studies have shown that when we’re deprived of sleep, sympathetic nervous system activity increases, which is also mirrored by an increase in blood pressure. Scientists studying coronary disease are investigating whether there’s a relationship between decreased sleep duration and increased risk of heart disease.
4. Cortisol levels lower
Levels of cortisol, often called the stress hormone, decreases during the first few hours of sleep before rising to peak soon after you wake up. This helps makes you feel perky when you wake up and switches on your appetite.

Sleep is important for everyone at every age.

5. Your muscles paralyse
While asleep, you cycle through periods of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM). It’s during REM sleep that we have the most vivid dreams.
During this stage, your muscles are temporarily paralysed, meaning you can’t move. Some scientists think this might be so that you don’t physically act out your dreams.
6. Anti-Diuretic Hormone (ADH) helps you not have to pee
Ever wondered why you have to go to the toilet to pee every couple of hours during the day, but can sleep a whole eight without heading to the loo? Thank ADH, an anti-diuretic hormone released by the brain under a circadian rhythm which switches off the need to urinate so often overnight.
7. Your immune system releases inflammation fighting cytokines
While you’re sleeping, your immune system releases a type of small proteins called cytokines. If you’re sick or injured, these cytokines help your body fight inflammation, infection and trauma. Without enough sleep, your immune system might not be able to function at its best.

Is your family getting enough good quality sleep?

Your body does a lot of important work while you’re asleep. Good sleep is vital for your physical and mental health, so if you’re having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, not feeling rested when you wake up or feeling tired during the day, talk to your doctor about what you can do to improve your sleep or whether there’s an underlying health issue or sleep disorder causing your lack of Zs.
 

Nick333

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Your mind is the one thing that distinguishes you from the beasts. For us humans it's the primary tool for grasping reality and for ordering our lives so we can grow and flourish and discover happiness. Why ingest chemicals to mess with your mind? Damage to the body is trivial compared to damage to your mind (which is not the brain). It can only end in your ruin, and damage to those who love you and depend on you. Get your life straightened out, my friend.
It's a fair question, and yet I suspect you enjoy alcohol likes most normal humans.
 

Nick333

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@OP even in my heyday I only ever did 2 or 3 day benders, but then I would drink as well as do whatever. I didn't read your entire post, but my questions are:

1.) what's missing from your life that you get high and stay up for a week?

2.) what's missing from your life that you can get high and stay up for a week (not too mention recover)?
 

Arthur

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It's a fair question, and yet I suspect you enjoy alcohol likes most normal humans.
Indeed. I generously take to heart St Paul's advice that wine is good for, er, the stomach. And monks, ad maiorem dei gloriam, perfected beer and the finest distilleries. ;)

This little rhyme by Hillaire Belloc sums it up:

Wherever the Catholic sun doth shine,
There’s always laughter and good red wine.
At least I’ve always found it so.
Benedicamus Domino!
 
Last edited:

The Voice

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Man, have to say, that's pretty ****ed up. You're eventually just going to crash, and may never get up.

Your body ONLY repairs itself, and performs a number of other life functions, when you're asleep. If it wasn't vital to our very existence, we simply wouldn't need to do it.

Stop ****ing around like this. Now.
 

KT-B

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Wonder if OP will hide or actually reply and answer the questions
 

Kornhole

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I know someone addicted to that stuff. Skinny as sherbert and never really has food...
 
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