Affordable ways to fight Eskom’s load shedding

FlashSA

Executive Member
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Oct 19, 2007
Messages
7,745
#3
Went 1200w inverter in 2008. Have since had to replace both batteries.

But, load shedding comes and the following continue to work:
42inch tv
32 inch tv
Surround sound
DSTV PVR
HP microserver
ADSL wifi router
CCTV with 8 camera's
Lamp in lounge and maIn bedroom

2hrs is easily survivable with all of that still available and running cost is zero (Besides minor DC to AC losses)
 

FlashSA

Executive Member
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Oct 19, 2007
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7,745
#6
I used a local battery repacking \ replacing outlet. Mine is the Tedelex Intellipower 4 which takes 2x 105ah batteries. One could just shop around for the best price on 2 of those and replace yourself to save on middle man costs. I used the specialist shop as I didn't have the time to run around. I managed to get a good price because I had to take another 2 Intellipower 4's to the guy from my office for the same battery replacements.
 

bwana

B MyBroadband
Super Moderator
Joined
Feb 23, 2005
Messages
71,218
#7
Went 1200w inverter in 2008. Have since had to replace both batteries.

But, load shedding comes and the following continue to work:
42inch tv
32 inch tv
Surround sound
DSTV PVR
HP microserver
ADSL wifi router
CCTV with 8 camera's
Lamp in lounge and maIn bedroom

2hrs is easily survivable with all of that still available and running cost is zero (Besides minor DC to AC losses)
Was that after the last round of major rolling blackouts? I picked up a 5.5kva generator for R3000 back when places like Builders Warehouse had over-anticipated the duration of the crisis and couldn't get rid of the things. :)
 

FlashSA

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Oct 19, 2007
Messages
7,745
#8
Was that after the last round of major rolling blackouts? I picked up a 5.5kva generator for R3000 back when places like Builders Warehouse had over-anticipated the duration of the crisis and couldn't get rid of the things. :)
Yip - I was moving out of the folks place at that time and furnishing my new townhouse. Included the Inverter in my appliances budget. Then, I paid R8k.

A few years later when load shedding was forgotten, I discovered that Teljoy was selling these things for R2k each as they needed to get rid of their stock as nobody wanted to buy anymore. I picked up 2 for our business for R4k + our own courier.

Pricing is now back up to R8k....
 

Jason_2177

Active Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2008
Messages
64
#9
I used a local battery repacking \ replacing outlet. Mine is the Tedelex Intellipower 4 which takes 2x 105ah batteries. One could just shop around for the best price on 2 of those and replace yourself to save on middle man costs. I used the specialist shop as I didn't have the time to run around. I managed to get a good price because I had to take another 2 Intellipower 4's to the guy from my office for the same battery replacements.
Thanks, how much did you pay each? Just so I have an idea.
 

FlashSA

Executive Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2007
Messages
7,745
#10
Thanks, how much did you pay each? Just so I have an idea.
Full price quoted was R2k per battery (First National Battery brand). Because we bought 3x2=6, he gave them to us for R1800 each, installed. You should be able to find for about R1500, but it is worth making sure that you get deep cycle
 

Jason_2177

Active Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2008
Messages
64
#11
Full price quoted was R2k per battery (First National Battery brand). Because we bought 3x2=6, he gave them to us for R1800 each, installed. You should be able to find for about R1500, but it is worth making sure that you get deep cycle
Cool, thanks :)
 

The_MAC

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2012
Messages
4,272
#12
Power_Calc.jpg

These are the calculations I used for my system.

Things to consider:

- Good practice to ensure longevity of your batteries is to not discharge more than 50%, even for deep-cycle batteries
- If you can afford it, go for a pure sine-wave inverter, its better for low power electronics i.e. cellphones, laptops etc.
- Don't buy cheap batteries, otherwise you will replace them within a year. Good batteries are the Royal DC31 (Price: R1850 - www.nrgtechnologies.co.za/)
 
Last edited:

bwana

B MyBroadband
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Feb 23, 2005
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71,218
#13
Yip - I was moving out of the folks place at that time and furnishing my new townhouse. Included the Inverter in my appliances budget. Then, I paid R8k.

A few years later when load shedding was forgotten, I discovered that Teljoy was selling these things for R2k each as they needed to get rid of their stock as nobody wanted to buy anymore. I picked up 2 for our business for R4k + our own courier.

Pricing is now back up to R8k....
I was a click away from advertising my generator for sale after almost four years of it not being used. So glad my procrastination paid off for once!
 

bwana

B MyBroadband
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Joined
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71,218
#14
View attachment 217448

These are the calculations I used for my system.

Things to consider:

- Good practice to ensure longevity of your batteries is to not discharge more than 50%, even for deep-cycle batteries
- If you can afford it, go for a pure sine-wave inverter, its better for low power electronics i.e. cellphones, laptops etc.
- Don't buy cheap batteries, otherwise you will replace them within a year. Good batteries are the Royal DC31
Why do you have that first line in there? Did you swop out all your CFL bulbs?
 

The_MAC

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Oct 11, 2012
Messages
4,272
#15
Why do you have that first line in there? Did you swop out all your CFL bulbs?
I was just playing around with numbers. Most of my bulbs are still CFL, but the few that are on the system are LED, the 7W ones for brighter light.
 

Skerminkel

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Dec 3, 2008
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3,638
#16
Save us from generators at every second house! Was in northern Nigeria recently and the din in the city at night, when the power goes out, is deafening.
 

FlashSA

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7,745
#17
While financially, I could purchase a decent genset and have it wired into the house properly, I chose the inverter because of instant cutover and zero running cost as well as silent operation. We plan food cooking around load shedding schedules. My next step is to replace our electric hob with a gas hob but there is no huge rush. If we HAVE to cook, a gas cylinder with the pan\pot holder attached suffices perfectly.

Geyser wise, I have had vacuum tube solar for 3 years and, according to my rough calculations, I have saved the R12k purchase price in reduced monthly elec costs already so it has paid for itself and now hot water is 100% free (apart from cloudy days where a 90min element bump is required).

If our household has tv, lights and hot water, we become immune to a load shed session which is awesome.
 

Skerminkel

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Dec 3, 2008
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3,638
#18
While financially, I could purchase a decent genset and have it wired into the house properly, I chose the inverter because of instant cutover and zero running cost as well as silent operation. We plan food cooking around load shedding schedules. My next step is to replace our electric hob with a gas hob but there is no huge rush. If we HAVE to cook, a gas cylinder with the pan\pot holder attached suffices perfectly.

Geyser wise, I have had vacuum tube solar for 3 years and, according to my rough calculations, I have saved the R12k purchase price in reduced monthly elec costs already so it has paid for itself and now hot water is 100% free (apart from cloudy days where a 90min element bump is required).

If our household has tv, lights and hot water, we become immune to a load shed session which is awesome.
All households in the country should do this and I suspect most will over the next three years.
 

The_MAC

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Oct 11, 2012
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#19
All households in the country should do this and I suspect most will over the next three years.
Thats where the Tesla Power-Wall comes into play. Although the concept is not new, a commercially affordable off-the-shelf product is needed in SA. The only issue, as always is cooking and heating, so will always have to resort to gas.
 

Skerminkel

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Dec 3, 2008
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#20
Thats where the Tesla Power-Wall comes into play. Although the concept is not new, a commercially affordable off-the-shelf product is needed in SA. The only issue, as always is cooking and heating, so will always have to resort to gas.
Indeed. The Powerwall is probably the iPad of UPSes. Soon there will be 100 alternatives on the market and prices will drop.
Another major change is people's awareness of energy use by different appliances. Cooking on gas will become more popular.

People will also realise the impact of proper building insulation to cut the cost of heating. Building standards on the Highveld will in future be seen as a classical example of how not to build.
(Better I get back to work before this one degrades to a major rant!)
 
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