Alarm raised over Full HD TV “lie” in South Africa

biometrics

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#7
Yup, wondering though about how many other manufactures are doing the same?
I had a Samsung 32" which had a resolution of 1360x768 and would work with a 1920x1080 signal albeit fuzzy. Was still sold as HD Ready not Full HD.

It even says the resolution is 1920x1080 on the picture of the box in the article. So clearly it's a lie.
 

Ryansr

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#10
Wow! The companies involved with this brand doesn't even try to inspire confidence in the product. LOL! :sick:
 

Rickster

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#13
You guys forget about 1080i?
Its a very touchy subject but I can say that 1080i is still FHD because its at a 1:1 ratio.

We have a very old LCD TV in the lounge that only supports 1080i and with my PS3 plugged into it running at 1080i it still looks very clear.
 

FaSMaN

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#14
I fell for this , took the monitor back the same week and was given a discount by game, due to the resolution , took it home where it lasted a year and a day before it broke (lines on screen) Game doesn't want to repair it.

For everyone's piece of mind Nu-world sells the following brands JVC, Sinotech and Telefunken when i tested the screens in shop Both JVC and Telefunken was misslabeled as 1080p, they didn't have a Sinotech 1080p 32" to test.

I find it absolutely horrifying that they claim it's 1080p (which is a recognisable standard) and it is not.

Let alone that the hotbar soldering on the ribbon cable gives out after a year and a day.

Stay with Samsung, LG or Hisense rather.
 

biometrics

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#15
You guys forget about 1080i?
Correct me if I'm wrong but that pertains to the lines being refreshed not the resolution. So 1080i is interlaced and the odd lines are refreshed and then the even lines whereas with 1080p they are all refreshed per cycle.
 

Electron1

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#16
Isnt Telefunken made in Germany??
According to the article: Nu-World are the distributors of Telefunken TVs in South Africa, and Telefunken international is a licenser.
For example the Telefunken TLEDD-28FHDA TV is manufactured by Qingdao Haier Electronics Co., Ltd.
Certainly not German manufactured, and probably not even designed there.
 

Daruk

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#17
I had a Samsung 32" which had a resolution of 1360x768 and would work with a 1920x1080 signal albeit fuzzy. Was still sold as HD Ready not Full HD.

It even says the resolution is 1920x1080 on the picture of the box in the article. So clearly it's a lie.
There was one glaring question missing from their discussion with Game and Nu-world.
How does this unit differ from those marked "HD Ready" or "720p".

As for the answers provided by Game and Nu-World, it's a pity the interviews weren't done simultaneously on the spot. That was like listening to a telling of the three little pigs... somewhat repetitious.
 

Arthur

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#18
Correct me if I'm wrong but that pertains to the lines being refreshed not the resolution. So 1080i is interlaced and the odd lines are refreshed and then the even lines whereas with 1080p they are all refreshed per cycle.
^^ Right.

The p and i refer to the refresh mode, progressive or interlaced. Not the resolution.

It's a semantic thing. "Full HD" can be misleading. The notion that HD refers to 1920x1080 is just a convention, and a variable one at that. 1366x768 is also HD.
 

Daruk

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#19
MyBroadband contacted Game, Nu-World (the distributors of Telefunken TVs in South Africa), and Telefunken international about the TV and its resolution capabilities.
So what's an appropriate answer to that question?
Apparently it's something on the lines of we adhere to a bunch of other unrelated standards so we're legit.
 

Daruk

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#20
It's a semantic thing. "Full HD" can be misleading. The notion that HD refers to 1920x1080 is just a convention, and a variable one at that. 1366x768 is also HD.
No it's not lol.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1080p
1080p (1920x1080 px; also known as Full HD or FHD and BT.709) is a set of HDTV high-definition video modes characterized by 1080 horizontal lines of vertical resolution[1] and progressive scan. The term usually assumes a widescreen aspect ratio of 16:9, implying a resolution of 2.1 megapixels. It is often marketed as Full HD, to contrast 1080p with 720p resolution screens.
Any display device that advertises 1080p typically refers to the ability to accept 1080p signals in native resolution format, which means there are a true 1920 pixels in width and 1080 pixels in height, and the display is not over-scanning, under-scanning, or reinterpreting the signal to a lower resolution. The HD ready 1080p logo program, by DIGITALEUROPE, requires that certified TV sets support 1080p 24 fps, 1080p 50 fps, and 1080p 60 fps formats, among other requirements, with fps meaning frames per second. For live broadcast applications, a high-definition progressive scan format operating at 1080p at 50 or 60 frames per second is currently being evaluated as a future standard for moving picture acquisition.[2][3][needs update] EBU has been endorsing 1080p50 as a future-proof production format because it improves resolution and requires no deinterlacing, allows broadcasting of standard 1080i25 and 720p50 signal alongside 1080p50 even in the current infrastructure and is compatible with DCI distribution formats.
Please don't suggest it's only those european colonialist crooks who use this convention.

If there's going to be any confusion, it should be over this

AV equipment manufacturers have adopted the term Full HD to mean a set can display all available HD resolutions up to 1080p. The term is misleading, however, because it does not guarantee the set is capable of rendering digital video at all frame rates encoded in source files with 1080 pixel vertical resolution. Most notably, a "Full HD" set is not guaranteed to support the 1080p24 format, leading to consumer confusion.[19][20][21] DigitalEurope (formerly EICTA) maintains the HD ready 1080p logo program that requires the certified TV sets to support 1080p24, 1080p50, and 1080p60, without overscan/underscan and picture distortion.
 
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