Amazon’s New Africa Site Draws Ire in Indigenous People Protest

Gordon_R

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Seems to be a new protest every month:
 

scudsucker

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Oi my fok. It's back to blaming Jan again.
To be fair, Jan did not survey the area.

If he had, he'd have realised that a site in a flood plain that regularly floods would be an unwise place to place a large commercial enterprise whose equipment might just be affected by the regular floods.

So, sure, we should not blame Jan on this one.
 

yebocan

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5L papsak wyn for each one and call it quits. Just like their forefathers before them.
may have been able to dupe my forebears, with the old dop system... this part of my family are woke... they prefer the gravy ... whether it be House of Traditional Leaders or from an international company that will throw some their way, just to keep quiet or go away. Seriously thought the whole heritage site commemoration angle was a nice touch to appease my ancestors... --clearly they reached out and laid out their concerns
 

Fulcrum29

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Amazon has the funds to buy land and not build on a heritage site.

Just wondering if this is actually a heritage site, or if it became one after Amazon bought it and is all a bit of attention seeking?

In a social media thread I read a while ago, the location is claimed to be the site where the Khoisan was victorious over the Portuguese.


Khoikhoi and San communities are opposing the building of Amazon's Africa headquarters​

By Nakirfai Tobor - 09 June 2021

The City of Cape Town in South Africa has approved plans for a new business and residential complex. What is interesting about the complex is that it will house e-commerce giant, Amazon’s headquarters for Africa.
However, these plans could be derailed as the Khoikhoi and San communities have contended that the complex is to be built on land that is sacred for their heritage. The Khoi and San people are specifically arguing that the land is of spiritual significance as it was a battlefield on which the Khoikhoi defended the territory from Portuguese colonizers in 1510.

As such, as the Khoikhoi and San communities argue, the land is an important part of their heritage.

The Battle of Salt River​

Based on several accounts of history about relations between the Khoikhoi and the Portuguese, their initial relations and trades were friendly and cordial. The main trade was that the Portuguese would give the Khoikhoi iron in exchange for cattle.

However, this apparently changed and relations between the Khoikhoi and Portuguese soured.
It is reported that some Portuguese sailors one day decided to visit a Khoikhoi village in the modern area and vicinity of Cape Town with the aim of stealing cattle. Unfortunately they were not successful as the Khoikhoi managed to defend against this and chase them back to their ships. However, it didn't end there.

"Upon reaching the safety of their ships the sailors begged Almeida to take revenge upon the villagers who had defended their cattle. Even though Almeida admitted that his men were likely to blame for what had occurred he led a party of 150 men armed with swords, lances and crossbows to enact an unwarranted revenge. When they reached the village the raiders seized a number of children and cattle. Approximately 170 Khoikhoi warriors fought back with stones and assegais. Using their cattle as shields they routed the raiders killing 64 of them including Almeida and 11 of his captains. This devastating defeat put pause to Portugal’s run of victories in Africa and Asia," reports South African History Online.

Amazon's Africa headquarters​

The Battle of Salt River is a significant part of Khoikhoi and San history but also South African history. As such, it is understandable to see why the two communities would oppose the building of Amazon's Africa headquarters on this piece of land.

Amazon’s planned offices will apparently be something to behold. They will have a total floor space of 70,000 square meters. Added to this, some have argued that the development will provide some much needed jobs.

But the Khoikhoi and San communities are not in agreement.

"Going onto someone's sacred terrain and building something on top of it, saying 'we're going to offer employment in doing so' is a morose and sick form of arguing the notion of job development," said Tauriq Jenkins, high commissioner for the Goringhaicona council.

This even precedes Jan's time.
 

Fulcrum29

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Since Amazon 100% supports restitution in accordance with empowerment, they should give this land to the Goringhaicona Khoena Council as patronage and then appoint the council members as SA board members and pay them x% annual gratitude.

Because hey, the council wants to take custodianship, because heritage. It is already being done, not so?

What do you think, Bezos?
 

maumau

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Suppose an aerial view of the proposed site was too much to ask.
 

Pegasus

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Yeah, my ancestors played on the driving range there. Also drank lots of beer. So did I.

20 million dollah and my ancestors will love them long time.
 

Vrotappel

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It doesn't matter where they build it the "we demand everything for free" will still protest.
Once they start building the building mafia will pitch up. There will also be continuously looting on the building site by the 'workers'.
 

Corelli

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Dear my broadband writer.

Jan van Riebeeck wasnt a colonialist. He was a medical doctor that came here to start a half-way station (non permanent) to prevent the deaths of thousands of sailors travel between Europe and Asia (Suez Canal didnt exist)

Please get your facts right.

This is why poor JvR is hated so much. People that dont actually understand history and then make it up how they perceived it to be.

"
in 1645, he began to advocate a refreshment station in the Cape of Good Hope after staying 18 days there during his return voyage. Two years later, support increased after a marooned VOC ship was able to survive in a temporary fortress. The Heeren XVII requested a report from Leendert Jansz and Mathys Proot, which recommended a Dutch presence.[6]

In 1643, Riebeeck travelled with Jan van Elseracq to the VOC outpost at Dejima in Japan. Seven years later in 1650, he proposed selling hides of South African wild animals to Japan.[7]

He volunteered to undertake the command of the initial Dutch settlement in the future South Africa and departed from Texel on 24 December 1651. He landed three ships (The Drommedaris and Goede Hoope) at the future Cape Town site on 6 April 1652 and the Reijger on 7 April 1652. He was accompanied by 82 men and 8 women[8] and then commenced to fortify it as a way station for the VOC trade route between the Netherlands and the East Indies.[citation needed] The primary purpose of this way station was to provide fresh provisions for the VOC fleets sailing between the Dutch Republic and Batavia, as deaths en route were very high. The Walvisch and the Oliphant arrived on 7 May 1652, having had 130 burials at sea.["
 

NarrowBandFtw

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Oi my fok. It's back to blaming Jan again.
that quote is also factually incorrect, the VOC at its peak had the resources to literally buy entire continents and armadas to defend them

Amazon's ~1.6 trillion market cap in pathetically inflated US dollars circa 2021 cannot even begin to compare, it's a mere drop in the ocean compared to an inflation adjusted VOC
 
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