Any Afrikaaners raising their kids English?

Polymathic

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So not that long ago I was talking a lady who I always assumed was Afrikaans on the account that her surname was Afrikaans. I asked her an Afrikaans related question and she told me if fact cannot speak Afrikaans even a little, she told some story about her father but honestly I wasn't really listening at that point.

I was thinking about the fact I have seen several black families raise their kids as English and wondered how many if any white afrikaaner couples are raising their kids English.
 

Jola

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Many, my kids went to English high schools. The one can still speak Afrikaans, the other only English.
 

Ninja'd

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Not Afrikaner but my family has been raising the new batch to be English first language. I was the last one among my siblings and cousins who did Afrikaans first language.
 

Lord Farquart

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Coming from a mixed marriage(Viva end of Apartheid:)), our kids are fully bilingual, now learning their 3rd language. They were destined for an English school, but ended up in Afrikaans primary( English schools sucked) and Dual-medium high school.
 

HennieWelkom

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I don't know what 'raising them English' means but my kids will be fluent Afrikaans and English speakers, I will take them to accent reduction classes so there accents don't betray them either. If I can get somebody to teach them Zulu/Xhosa/French or German then that would be swell as well.
 

Sepeng

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They were talking about it on the radio this morning or yesterday actually; with us it's a bit complicated.
I'd call my wife English but she speaks Afrikaans fluently; her dad mostly speaks Afrikaans and she'll speak it to him or cousins. But she hasn't really shown an interest in making our kids bilingual. So they're as bad as me at it.
 

Snyper564

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My entire family is Afrikaans some to the point where they couldn't speak English. My parents struggled a bit with the language at Uni being English and didn't want my sister and I to suffer so they taught us predominantly English growing up. I understand Afrikaans fluently, speaking not to fluently but ok but I'm thankful for the choice they made.
 

tcofran

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My son is on the Autism spectrum, and only speaks English, although we are Afrikaans..... But, i wouldn't care if he speaks Swahili for that matter :)
 

Polymathic

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I don't know what 'raising them English' means but my kids will be fluent Afrikaans and English speakers, I will take them to accent reduction classes so there accents don't betray them either. If I can get somebody to teach them Zulu/Xhosa/French or German then that would be swell as well.
Raising them with English spoken at home
 

now05ster

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We do. English is our home language mostly because the wife is English and her Afrikaans is atrocious

We have two children. I would like our youngest to be bilingual though, allegedly it is good for brain development.
 

ChilliPepper

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I don't have kids but have know a few Afrikaans couples that raise their kids English. The results are often hilarious as the parents' English is not always great. On of my favourite is ending ALL sentences with "see".
 

thestaggy

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I have an Afrikaans surname but I was brought up in an English home, as were both of my parents.

My great-grandfather on my dad's side was full Afrikaans until he met my great-grandmother (Welsh-born). Couldn't even speak English until he met her. My grandfather was their only child and he was raised English and was very much an Anglophile. This was largely due to the fact that my grandfather was born in 1938 and my great-grandfather spent 4-years fighting in North Africa, so wasn't there during my grandfather's formative years. My great-grandmother was incredibly patriotic and so my grandfather grew up surrounded by ex-pat Brits, listening to BBC broadcasts of the war's progress. Grandmother on my dad's side was raised English, of Dutch and Irish ancestry. My dad was raised English and can barely speak Afrikaans.

My grandmother on my mother's side grew up on a farm and only spoke Afrikaans until she moved to the former Northern Rhodesia. There she became a subject of the UK and learnt the Queen's language. My grandfather on my mother's side was full Afrikaans. My mother, with her Afrikaans surname, was raised English but she is able to converse in Afrikaans. Not fluent, but more than passable.
 

Nobody Important

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They were talking about it on the radio this morning or yesterday actually; with us it's a bit complicated.
I'd call my wife English but she speaks Afrikaans fluently; her dad mostly speaks Afrikaans and she'll speak it to him or cousins. But she hasn't really shown an interest in making our kids bilingual. So they're as bad as me at it.
She just doesn't want the kids letting you know when she is moaning about you to her friends. :p
 
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Dolby

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I am the kid raised English ;)

My dad was quite staunch Afrikaans in his teens (couldn't speak / didn't want to speak English, from what I hear).

He then met my mom (English) in his early 20s ... and that was that! He changed and I was raised English ... I didn't even know my dad was Afrikaans and he couldn't even help with my Afrikaans homework.
 
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cn@

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It's simple.

If parents want to raise their children with English as a first language their own command of English should be excellent.

If it's not, they will stunt their children's linguistic and cognitive development and their children would have been better off having been raised in Afrikaans with English as a second language.
 

now05ster

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It's simple.

If parents want to raise their children with English as a first language their own command of English should be excellent.

If it's not, they will stunt their children's linguistic and cognitive development and their children would have been better off having been raised in Afrikaans with English as a second language.
You meant to say "better of" and not "better off".


I better put a smiley there.

Now reminded of "would of".
 

EADC

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I am the kid raised English ;)

My dad was quite staunch Afrikaans in his teens (couldn't speak / didn't want to speak English, from what I hear).

He then met my mom (English) in his early 20s ... and that was that! He changed and I was raised English ... I didn't even know my dad was Afrikaans and he couldn't even help with my Afrikaans homework.
That's actually not odd at all the rule of thumb is kids usually get raised in the mothers home language.
 
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