Application for Greek Passport - Please Help

mbeylis

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2006
Messages
552
Hello

Well I have been surfing the web for quite sometime now trying to find out more information on how to go about obtaining a Greek Passport but to date haven't found enough information so I was hoping that someone else out there might have already obtained their Greek Passport and could help me out with the how, what, where and who etc

I have been in contact with the Greek Consulate in Johannesburg and they have faxed me through a form detailing all the documents I require

I have been to Home Affairs and applied for both me and my fathers Birth and Marriage Certificates and these I am told are ready for collection

My main problem is with my Grand Father who is the one with the Greek Origin having been born on the Greek Island of Imbros. I do not have an ID number for my grand dad. all I have is a document he received when he immigrated to South Africa stating that he is of Greek origin etc. Would this be satisfactory

Are there any websites that one can request these documents from Greek Municipalities?

Also are there any reputable companies that you can suggest that would do the whole process of applying for a Greek Passport for me obviously at a cost. I did read a thread here which mentioned this but didnt give a name or contact details

I am also thinking of making an appointment with the lady at the Greek Consulate and taking what forms I have and discuss this with her but I don't want to keep going back and forwards as it means time off work and I would rather have everything I need before doing this

Any help would be greatly appreciated

Thanks
Mark
 

icyrus

Executive Member
Joined
Oct 5, 2005
Messages
8,609
The first thing to understand when dealing with the Greeks is that everything is going to be a huge mission.

This site has some useful info on but is obviously more geared to American audiences:

http://livingingreece.gr/2007/07/09/acquiring-greek-citizenship-by-foreign-nationals-of-greek-origin/

The best course of action will be to go to the embassy and meet with the woman there (who will no doubt be infuriatingly apathetic). She will give you all the forms to fill in and all the documents you will need (while leaving out some that they will only tell you about at a later stage).

You (and your whole family up to you) will probably need to be registered at the local municipality in Greece where you are claiming heritage from before they issue a passport. If this isn't already done you may have to go to Greece to do it or give someone there power of attorney to do it for you.

Depending on how much paper work you have already and how far in the process you are, this might be a long wait.

Good luck
 

CatB

New Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2017
Messages
1
Similar situation

Hi Mark,

I find myself in a similar situation.

Have you had any luck?

-C
 

mbeylis

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2006
Messages
552
Hi

No unfrotunately not

I would still love to get my Greek Passport but at this stage there appears to be no clear process to follow to accomplish this save going to Greece :-<

Mark
 

Hosehead

Executive Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
7,839
Been down that rd for an ex brother in law his sister and my daughter and after pulling your hair out of your head you will be bald
All SA documents will need to be apostilled at the high court (free) and then translated into Greek by a consulate nominated
Translator at your expense ( a lot)
If you don't speak Greek hiring a Greek lawyer is a pointless exercise as none speak English despite being in the EU
There is the document exempting you from compulsory military service you will need from Greece
You will ultimately be better off going to the village muncipality where the relative you make your claim on is born and get correct birth dates etc
(Expensive plus cost of translator )
Not saying it's impossible but the Greeks don't make it easy and they are about as helpful as a bunch of potted plants
They love reams and reams of stamped officious looking papers and they hoard these like rats while they blame Athens for all delays
Good luck
 

Colin62

Executive Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2008
Messages
8,089
If you can't even speak Greek, then I don't see why they should bust a gut for you to apply for a Greek passport.
 

HunterGR

Expert Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2011
Messages
1,961
Was your birth registered in Greece by your parents? If so then you can apply for a Greek ID number, which in turn makes it much easier for you to get a Greek Passport. Bear in mind that national service is still compulsory there, so if you are under 45, you can expect to be called up and do a year's national service.

If your birth was not registered, then i am afraid you are basically screwed.
 

mbeylis

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2006
Messages
552
Wow. I made this post 11 years ago, cant believe its that long ago

Afraid to say I never did come right although @JohnNicolas your success does give me renewed hope

Thank you for the feedback

Which embassy did you go to?

Mark
 

JohnNicolas

New Member
Joined
May 14, 2019
Messages
2
Wow. I made this post 11 years ago, cant believe its that long ago

Afraid to say I never did come right although @JohnNicolas your success does give me renewed hope

Thank you for the feedback

Which embassy did you go to?

Mark
Hi Mark
I started out at the Greek Consulate in Cape Town then finished off the process in Johannesburg because I had subsequently moved provinces.
 

Michelle Tritsikas

New Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2019
Messages
2
Hi Mark
I started out at the Greek Consulate in Cape Town then finished off the process in Johannesburg because I had subsequently moved provinces.
Hi @JohnNicolas I see this thread is very old. Hope you can give me some guidance. My father in law was born and raised in Greece then emigrated to South Africa. He never registered my husband`s birth at the Greek Consulate/Embassy in South Africa. We thought it best to go to the embassy taking all Birth Certificates, Marriage certificates and ID documents with. Do we need to make an appointment first? Will they at least be able to provide us with information and help us get the process started? I believe there are no way to get the process started via mail and online if Im right?
 

JohnNicolas

New Member
Joined
May 14, 2019
Messages
2
Hi @JohnNicolas I see this thread is very old. Hope you can give me some guidance. My father in law was born and raised in Greece then emigrated to South Africa. He never registered my husband`s birth at the Greek Consulate/Embassy in South Africa. We thought it best to go to the embassy taking all Birth Certificates, Marriage certificates and ID documents with. Do we need to make an appointment first? Will they at least be able to provide us with information and help us get the process started? I believe there are no way to get the process started via mail and online if Im right?
Hi there

From my personal experience paying them a personal visit is always best. For some reason, they are not too engaging but you have to remain calm and polite. Should they be overwhelmed, then ask for a firm appointment to discuss your matter but make sure you're speaking to right person. In my case, I politely asked to speak directly to the Consulate General who at the time was exceptionally helpful.

Now, if your father in-law was born and registered in Greece and you have the documents to prove it then the process of registering your husband should be pretty straight forward. it will however involve translating and apostillation of all documents, possibly including a police clearance. Only once your husband has been fully registered will he be able to apply for a Greek passport he will also need to register your marriage, which will then entitle you to a spousal VISA. All-in-all the process could take 12-24 months to conclude.
 

Michelle Tritsikas

New Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2019
Messages
2
Hi there

From my personal experience paying them a personal visit is always best. For some reason, they are not too engaging but you have to remain calm and polite. Should they be overwhelmed, then ask for a firm appointment to discuss your matter but make sure you're speaking to right person. In my case, I politely asked to speak directly to the Consulate General who at the time was exceptionally helpful.

Now, if your father in-law was born and registered in Greece and you have the documents to prove it then the process of registering your husband should be pretty straight forward. it will however involve translating and apostillation of all documents, possibly including a police clearance. Only once your husband has been fully registered will he be able to apply for a Greek passport he will also need to register your marriage, which will then entitle you to a spousal VISA. All-in-all the process could take 12-24 months to conclude.
@JohnNicolas I appreciate and can`t thank you enough for the response and clarity. It will help us a great deal!!
 

panayi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2011
Messages
356
Hi there

From my personal experience paying them a personal visit is always best. For some reason, they are not too engaging but you have to remain calm and polite. Should they be overwhelmed, then ask for a firm appointment to discuss your matter but make sure you're speaking to right person. In my case, I politely asked to speak directly to the Consulate General who at the time was exceptionally helpful.

Now, if your father in-law was born and registered in Greece and you have the documents to prove it then the process of registering your husband should be pretty straight forward. it will however involve translating and apostillation of all documents, possibly including a police clearance. Only once your husband has been fully registered will he be able to apply for a Greek passport he will also need to register your marriage, which will then entitle you to a spousal VISA. All-in-all the process could take 12-24 months to conclude.

Echoing what JohnNicolas is saying.

The key to this whole process is getting the marriages, births, etc registered in the Greek municipality, which the consulate can help with although they need a fixed starting point - this being the registration document (pistopitiko or katastasi) of the person that was born or registered in Greece - this is normally under the father's name, but can be the mother if that is the connection. From here, once that person gets married a new 'page' (sylitha) is created for the new family and the children are registered on that 'page' and then marriages etc from there. There are 2 types of registration - one that you are registered and second that eligible for a passport. Females are automatically eligible; males have to prove that they have done national service or have not lived in Greece for longer than 6 months continuously (school records, work service records, etc) - again this process through the consulate.

In my case, had to register my grandparents marriage, my mom's birth, my parents' marriage (my dad was born in Greece anyways) and then my birth along with my siblings, then register my marriage and the kids' birth to be fully registered in Greece. All that done 7 years ago to eventually go apply for the kids' passports TODAY !! Yay !!

In the end, you may need to go to Greece to get some of the documents from the municipality
 

ChrisBallie

New Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2018
Messages
2
Hi All, I have been following this post for some time. I am in the process of obtaining my passport. My story is slightly complicated as it involves a spelling mistake in my surname. My father is registered in Greece and has his passport. He did not register his marriage through the consulate and continued life as a South African citizen. A number of years ago when we initially tried to start the process the consulate requested our pistopitiko which contradicts our surname in South Africa versus our surname (or my father's surname) in Greece.

The latest update from the Johannesburg Consulate is that either I change my surname here in South Africa or I travel to Greece and change the registered surname there.

On my father's passport, it actually has three spellings - The Greek version plus two English spelt surnames (one which is correct and the other which is "incorrect"). My father currently has 3 versions of what is the same name in his passport.

My question is as follows: Is it worthwhile to go to Greece and register the marriage and births as per my father's passport and hope that it can be done? Or should I go the expensive and long process of changing our surname here in South Africa to the correct spelling as per our Greek registered spelling?

Sorry for the long complicated story and I "hope" that someone has had a similar situation and was able to resolve it?
 
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