As a senior software dev, what's the one piece of advice that you would give to your younger self ?

semaphore

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Terrible abusive boss who blew through the money, and then made it the teams problem to fix. Had them work 12 hour days 7 days a week for 3 months trying to make the deadline on a military contract otherwise they would not get any more cash and stopped paying salaries half way through. Entire dev team walked out after the 3 months as there was no end in sight.
Cute 12 hour days, talk to me when you pulled 18-20 hour days for more than a year.
 

semaphore

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I work in finance, and love it. I don't work at a bank though. The biggest complaints I've heard about banks are that they're political as hell, and there are a lot of old legacy systems to work around.
Being mostly in finance my entire career I've had no issues with it. The bank sector was not bad, but like you stated politically it was horrible and primarily my reason for leaving.
 

Cius

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Cute 12 hour days, talk to me when you pulled 18-20 hour days for more than a year.
Anyone that did that is a doormat with zero backbone. Nothing is worth that kind of schedule as it could kill you.
 

semaphore

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Anyone that did that is a doormat with zero backbone. Nothing is worth that kind of schedule as it could kill you.
Yep agreed, it had nothing to do with back bone or being a doormat. It was our client, and when they were paying 60m for 6 months worth of work they kinda expected you to move heaven and earth. :p But yes after a while I put my foot down and stopped caring about the big bonuses and resigned.
 

Cius

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Yep agreed, it had nothing to do with back bone or being a doormat. It was our client, and when they were paying 60m for 6 months worth of work they kinda expected you to move heaven and earth. :p But yes after a while I put my foot down and stopped caring about the big bonuses and resigned.
Nice. I learned that early on. If you are good and do your work smart long hours are optional. I have never not gotten a bonus after 13 years at my current employer and I work overtime perhaps 5 to 10% of the year (in true emergencies). A lot of guys around me work crazy overtime and the company gleefully accepts it but it does not seem to matter all that much. I kind of made it clear early on in my career that I insist on work life balance. I have some very big reasons for that with the biggest being that my daughter has a life expectancy roughly around my retirement age. I have to make it work now. Worst they could do is fire me I guess but that has never happened and I have been very well looked after in terms or remuneration so I will keep at it while I can.

I realize some bosses may see things differently and punish me come bonus time for not pulling overtime like some do but for now I have had good bosses who realize my output is often higher than some of those working hours longer than me because of how I work. Anyways, remember, its a choice. Especially in the current environment with the outflow of IT skills overseas I think companies are gonna have to look after the few that remain to keep them. Kinda works for those that stay.
 

krycor

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Keep setting aside time to learn new skills.
Learning obscure systems that no one else wants to know is great for job security but can also if it becomes the only thing you do be a dead end. Keep pushing into the main fields where the most money is generated.
Stay the hell out of the Banking industry.
  1. Get the hell out of a bank.
  2. Don't stay with development for too long (Or rather in your professional capacity).

Two points.
Pretty much that..

Having domain knowledge means I’ll never go hungry no matter where in world I end up but moving into more fun mainstream jobs is another thing as the IT industry suffers from hiring non-graduates & people who can’t tie their shoes which makes for an unpleasant experience if you ask me.

If I had to do it over again, immediately leave Sa instead of the get experience and then leave strategy. That was dumb of me.
 

Kosmik

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Why though? You can't say that they are cheaper.
Also the amount of graduates who passed with great marks etc but can't apply for sh** is shocking. Its far more about being able to adapt and find solutions than route learning. Not saying all, just a very large sample that comes through....
 

CamiKaze

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Also the amount of graduates who passed with great marks etc but can't apply for sh** is shocking. Its far more about being able to adapt and find solutions than route learning. Not saying all, just a very large sample that comes through....
I feel that it depends on if the job is in line with what they studied.

Can't just drop a com sci grad into a web design or FE dev role. Why bother with stats and math that is more aligned with ML and more analytically aligned things than making them something that doesn't interest them.
 

Kosmik

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I feel that it depends on if the job is in line with what they studied.

Can't just drop a com sci grad into a web design or FE dev role. Why bother with stats and math that is more aligned with ML and more analytically aligned things than making them something that doesn't interest them.
One does expect them to understand object orientation and basic data base design. A lot can't even do that.
 

_kabal_

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Implementing a generic system that caters for things that might but, probably won't happen/be needed, is not a virtue
 

[)roi(]

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Implementing a generic system that caters for things that might but, probably won't happen/be needed, is not a virtue
YAGNI
.
.
.
Ron Jeffries said:
“You aren’t gonna need it” (acronym: YAGNI) is a principle of extreme programming (XP) that states a programmer should not add functionality until deemed necessary.”
YAGNI is not an absolute...
Martin Fowler said:
Yagni only applies to capabilities built into the software to support a presumptive feature, it does not apply to effort to make the software easier to modify.
Examples:
  • Maximise use of generics with reusable Data types, Frameworks, ... inline with DRY.
  • For app / feature specific features; YAGNI.
 
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