Astrophotography - Orion

surface

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If you would like a very decent scope that has wifi and very easy to use I am selling one of mine, a Celestron Nexstar Evolution 8.
Replying to September 2019 post so I suppose you sold this already?
 

surface

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Hi, my scope is still available if you are interested at all
Yip, I am interested to get a good one to start with. Would you share details and expected price please? Here on forum or by private message. Thanks
 

surface

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I am looking to buy this for my SO. Pardon me for possibly the silliest newbie question but what is the gap for? Does something else go in that gap?


1596303648454.png
 

kennedym

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I am looking to buy this for my SO. Pardon me for possibly the silliest newbie question but what is the gap for? Does something else go in that gap?


View attachment 885198
I believe it primarily has to do with heat. You generally want it to be cool else the image can be "fuzzy", it helps the heat escape.
It should also be more portable because you may be able to collapse the tube.
 
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newby_investor

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You do need to let the temperate stabilise but that's on the mirror.

The gap makes it lighter. The mirror is really the only thing you need, the rest of the structure is mainly there to hold the secondary mirror and eyepiece in the right place.

I've seen portable amateur made telescopes which are basically just frames.

A solid tube does help with blocking out some ambient light but you need to be quite experienced to notice the difference IMO.

That's a nice telescope, but I'd suggest considering the equivalent 8". In my experience, you don't get much better viewing from a 10", but an 8" is lighter and easier to move around so you'd be much more likely to actually pull it out and use it. Either way though those Dobsonians are great telescopes and you won't be sorry.
 

surface

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You do need to let the temperate stabilise but that's on the mirror.

The gap makes it lighter. The mirror is really the only thing you need, the rest of the structure is mainly there to hold the secondary mirror and eyepiece in the right place.

I've seen portable amateur made telescopes which are basically just frames.

A solid tube does help with blocking out some ambient light but you need to be quite experienced to notice the difference IMO.

That's a nice telescope, but I'd suggest considering the equivalent 8". In my experience, you don't get much better viewing from a 10", but an 8" is lighter and easier to move around so you'd be much more likely to actually pull it out and use it. Either way though those Dobsonians are great telescopes and you won't be sorry.
Thank you. Someone suggested to go for 12" but I think I like this reason.
but an 8" is lighter and easier to move around so you'd be much more likely to actually pull it out and use it.
 

newby_investor

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Thank you. Someone suggested to go for 12" but I think I like this reason.
So out in the country, with very dark skies, you appreciate bigger aperture. I got an amazing view of 47-Tucanae (a globular cluster) a couple of year's back with a friend's 16" Dobby at a star party. It took my breath away.

However, it took him quite a while to set up properly. Definitely the sort of thing that would discourage you from hauling it out quickly for an evening of star-gazing in the back yard. Which you can actually do reasonably successfully, even in the city.

The 8" on the other hand is very easy to set up. 10" would be a compromise between 8 and 12.

It's up to you really. Best thing really is to try them out, if you know someone that has one, you'll be able to gauge for yourself. If it were my money, I'd buy the 8 in a heartbeat. I have a 4.5" tripod-mounted one from my student days (got it quite cheaply) which I hardly use because I'm currently a parent of a toddler. Once my boy grows up a bit I'm thinking of upgrading to an 8" dobby. Best all-purpose telescope IMO.
 

surface

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I must say I am taken aback by the actual size of dobsonian telescopes. I was not expecting this.


1596362122404.png
 

newby_investor

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I must say I am taken aback by the actual size of dobsonian telescopes. I was not expecting this.


View attachment 885492
The size is really only an issue with storing and transporting. They're not heavy at all. Not until you get past 12" or so.

Mine is about halfway between the bottom two plus a tripod. It's more compact to store, but it's also more of a pain to set up for use.
 

konfab

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I am looking to buy this for my SO. Pardon me for possibly the silliest newbie question but what is the gap for? Does something else go in that gap?


View attachment 885198
That gap is there to reduce the weight.

The more important thing, is what do you want the scope for? R17k is a pricy chunk to spend. And the problem with a dob like that, is that it isn't very good for astrophotography as it is an alt-az scope. Which means that you cannot do long term exposure.
 

surface

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That gap is there to reduce the weight.

The more important thing, is what do you want the scope for? R17k is a pricy chunk to spend. And the problem with a dob like that, is that it isn't very good for astrophotography as it is an alt-az scope. Which means that you cannot do long term exposure.
Thanks. I am now going for 8" dob as gift to my better half. She is not really keen on astrophotography but interested in view of the night sky. If interest develops over next 2 years, I could look at getting nextstar 8 SE but at this stage, it doesn't seem right.

p.s. I realize I posted this in astro-photography thread though. my bad.
 

newby_investor

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You can do astrophotography with a dobsonian to some extent.

The moon and planets are bright enough that they don't need long exposures for example. But you'll likely need to use an eyepiece for the planets as you'll want all the magnification that you can get.

For DSOs, you can do lots of short exposures and combine the pictures in software using something like Deep Sky Stacker.
 

konfab

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Thanks. I am now going for 8" dob as gift to my better half. She is not really keen on astrophotography but interested in view of the night sky. If interest develops over next 2 years, I could look at getting nextstar 8 SE but at this stage, it doesn't seem right.

p.s. I realize I posted this in astro-photography thread though. my bad.
No worries.

My experience is there is nothing more frustrating than having a scope that is a PITA to get setup and working properly. And what is worse is being limited by your hardware.
 

surface

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No worries.

My experience is there is nothing more frustrating than having a scope that is a PITA to get setup and working properly. And what is worse is being limited by your hardware.
Yes - that is one reason why I am not going for equatorial mounts/goto/fancy stuff to start with. I have been told Dobs are simple to use - going through youtube vids, reddit and Dobs seems to be popular in terms of simplicity & economy. I realize they are a bit heavy but willing to do some lifting work for now. :p
 
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