Banting / LCHF Ingredients Johannesburg

remybfg10k

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Anyone on here started a thread about where you can locate LCHF ingredients, best pricing etc. for Joburg?

I have seen a number of Cape Town based suppliers of almond butter etc. so hoping users can post (or have posted somewhere else) their experiences on pricing / stock / location

Update:

500g Salted Butter (Pick n Pay) R32.99

2L Full Cream Milk (Pick n Pay) R19.50

1L Extra Virgin Olive Oil (Pick n Pay) R69.90

Raw Cashews (Food Lovers Market) R149.99 per kg*

Raw "non whole" Cashew Nuts (Impala) R79.95 per kg (for use in making Cashew Butter)*

1 Cauliflower Head (Food Lovers Market) R6.65

Coconut Flakes (Food Lovers Market) R99.99 per kg

18 Free Range Eggs (Food Lovers Market) R36.99*

Raw Macadamia Nuts (Food Lovers Market) R189.90 per kg

500g Full Cream Olymbos Plain Greek Yoghurt (Food Lovers Market) R14.50

Raw Sesame Seeds (Food Lovers Market) R89.99 per kg

Raw Almonds (Impala) R89.99 per 500g*

250g Full Cream Cheese (Spar) R35.99

1L Full Cream (Food Lovers Market) R33.50*

500g Springbok Unsalted Butter (Spar) R39.99

500ml Organic Coconut Oil (Fresh Earth) R72.00 (Cheapest yet)*

1kg Lifestyle Xylitol (Dischem) R129.95

Steak Mince (Holstein Meats) R66.50 per kg

Biltong (Holstein Meats) R165.00 per kg

Italian Salami (Holstein Meats) R145.00 per kg

Chicken Wings (Holstein Meats) R43.95 per kg

Cocktail Pork Sausages (Holstein Meats) R55.95 per kg

Beef Sausages (Holstein Meats) R55.00 per kg

1kg Eskort Bacon Cutts (Spar) R77.99
 
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DJ...

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Be careful with what xylitol you buy. Always buy xylitol that has an ingredients list, as often the xylitol you buy is a mix and they aren't quite honest about this with their packaging.

Can't recall if the Lifestyle brand is the right one, but all I'm saying is don't just go for the cheapest stuff...
 

SmartKit

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I've seen almonds in the R160-R170 per kg range at Impala Fruit & Flowers
 

remybfg10k

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Be careful with what xylitol you buy. Always buy xylitol that has an ingredients list, as often the xylitol you buy is a mix and they aren't quite honest about this with their packaging.

Can't recall if the Lifestyle brand is the right one, but all I'm saying is don't just go for the cheapest stuff...

I noticed that as well, the Lifestyle is the Dischem brand Xylitol, which only contains Xylitol powder, and it is the most expensive I have seen for a 1kg.

Xylitol has helped the move from fructose/sucrose etc. had one tasty lemon cream mousse with it

Do you have any experience with sugar alcohols?
 

APoc184

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I buy my Xylitol from the Health Shop in Menlyn. Think they were on par with some online retailers.

I've only bought one pack when I started the LCHF thing 4 months ago. Still have some left. Wife doesn't do sugar in her drinks at all and I do like one cup of coffee a week at most. So well worth paying for the decent stuff.
 

Orihalcon

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Coconut flour is so hard to find.

Make your own?

Buy dessicated coconut, warm water, blender, straining bag. Take pulp and dry it and grind it up, whalla. Coconut flour at a fraction of the cost and you get delicious coconut milk from the fluid that you strain. Keeps for 3 days refrigirated. Yummy stuff to use in cooking too.
 

DJ...

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Make your own?

Buy dessicated coconut, warm water, blender, straining bag. Take pulp and dry it and grind it up, whalla. Coconut flour at a fraction of the cost and you get delicious coconut milk from the fluid that you strain. Keeps for 3 days refrigirated. Yummy stuff to use in cooking too.

My issue with dessicated coconut is two-fold: 1) the predominant flavours of coconut are volatile molecules that degrade very quickly, so dessicated coconut has a fraction of the flavour of actual coconut. Secondly, and quite ironically, the high ketone count of coconut is also responsible for turning it rancid very quickly, so it can and does go off within days if not stored properly. This is further exacerbated by the hydration process. The ketones are called aliphatic methyl ketones, if anyone is interested...
 

Orihalcon

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My issue with dessicated coconut is two-fold: 1) the predominant flavours of coconut are volatile molecules that degrade very quickly, so dessicated coconut has a fraction of the flavour of actual coconut. Secondly, and quite ironically, the high ketone count of coconut is also responsible for turning it rancid very quickly, so it can and does go off within days if not stored properly. This is further exacerbated by the hydration process. The ketones are called aliphatic methyl ketones, if anyone is interested...

The flour keeps for a year when dried properly...been using it this way for months. The milk you use within 3 days as stated. And the milk is def coconut flavoured...the flour too. So I have not experienced any of the problems you've noted.

Furthermore opt for virgin dessicated coconut...not ones you get at grocery chains as they have sulphide preservarives added.
 

DJ...

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The flour keeps for a year when dried properly...been using it this way for months. The milk you use within 3 days as stated. And the milk is def coconut flavoured...the flour too. So I have not experienced any of the problems you've noted.

Furthermore opt for virgin dessicated coconut...not ones you get at grocery chains as they have sulphide preservarives added.

The simple nature of dessication will degrade the flavour as the flavour molecules are volatile. I'm sure you can get better quality ingredients than the crap you buy in those little Moirs bags though, I just tend to purchase raw pulp instead when I need.

But for coconut flour it would be perfectly okay, even the crap stuff to be honest, as you want a neutral flavour from flour. My other issue, and I've posted about this before, is that you simply cannot replicate the gluten network from flour with coconut flour, and that network is vital to most flour applications. I posted about the science of this a few months ago...
 

D3nz

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1L Lifestyle organic odourless coconut oil R99 at Dischem.
 

Orihalcon

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The simple nature of dessication will degrade the flavour as the flavour molecules are volatile. I'm sure you can get better quality ingredients than the crap you buy in those little Moirs bags though, I just tend to purchase raw pulp instead when I need.

But for coconut flour it would be perfectly okay, even the crap stuff to be honest, as you want a neutral flavour from flour. My other issue, and I've posted about this before, is that you simply cannot replicate the gluten network from flour with coconut flour, and that network is vital to most flour applications. I posted about the science of this a few months ago...

Yeah I know. Which is why you don't get a lot of pure coconut flour recipes as its incredibly thirsty if I can call it that. Always have to splice with another type of flour...more often than not tapioca.

Not that I care really, I go half half with ground golden flax meal and just double the egg count the recipe calls for. Works everytime.
 

DJ...

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Yeah I know. Which is why you don't get a lot of pure coconut flour recipes as its incredibly thirsty if I can call it that. Always have to splice with another type of flour...more often than not tapioca.

Not that I care really, I go half half with ground golden flax meal and just double the egg count the recipe calls for. Works everytime.

Cool. Not sure if you're aware, but coconut is very prone to salmonella contamination, so you want to keep a clean environment when working with it and storing it...
 
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