Blade Runner director signs on to make Dune reboot

AfricanTech

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Everyone got excited and the knee jerk reaction was to subscribe. Once the movie has aired and they coming off the high, theyll soon realise they've signed on for a bare bones service with one hit wonders and there'll be mass cancellations and no repeat business as you've already gone straight to the home market.


Either way they taking a gamble. The money will always be in cinema, as we've seen with Marvel and Star Wars.
Disney will never release their tentpoles on their service.

Mulan?
 

ponder

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With the virus a thing of the past come October 2021 that's when you need the tentpole movies to encourage people back into the cinemas and Dune was would've been that movie.

Dune is that big/known?

I don't think many people I know would be standing in the ticket line for it.
 

Cray

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Dune is that big/known?

I don't think many people I know would be standing in the ticket line for it.
You clearly need better friends... /s

Not because they don't want to watch Dune but who stands in line for movie tickets these days?
 

Herr der Verboten

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They're doing the same thing with WW 1984 and a few other films iirc. As long as the actors/directors/producers get their share of anticipated backend it might not be as catastrophic as you think.

Besides - the studios are carrying millions in debt for a lot films that are sitting around gathering dust. How do you think that's going to help the movie industry.
As much as I appreciate that director; he is being an idiot.

A) Go theater and no one to little sample goes to see
B) Do theater and vod, more people can see it

Let's thumbsuck the same at 8 million sample of people.

During covid you reach 100 000k? So say you reach one million due to the state of things, let's say it costs 20 usd per ticket. Congratulations you either made nothing up to 20 million usd. Let's now add another 10x time to that because of said vod. Now your return suddenly grows from nothing up to a possible 200 million usd in a single shot. Sure some will pirate, but this for me personally is the same old and quite tired argument of mr book store vs mr ebook store.

It is the way things will go, it is the way things is going and just because you are stuck in yesteryear thinking doesn't mean we all are. For me personally I'd rather go vod for movies for R200 cutting out the cellphone children and their bs. I may not have the fanciest cinematic setup at home but it beats their kak any day hands down. I haven't been to the cinames for a long time now and they are sooner than later going to realise there are many more of us.
 
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WaxLyrical

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Dune is that big/known?

I don't think many people I know would be standing in the ticket line for it.
No one wants to stand in line for anything now. The planned marketing machine would've kicked this into high gear by now with games, books, comics, toys. Covid killed it.

 

OrbitalDawn

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You're still thinking in terms of box office returns dictating whether a follow-up gets the green-light, but nothing is dependent on the reception and profit of the first film... Everything is dependant on the structure of AT&T and Warner Media.

HBO Max sits alongside Warner Bros in the structure, not as a subsidiary... WB box office take is offset by HBO subs and there is no middle-man cinema owner to pay a cut to.

HBO had 8,6 million subscribers in November... After WB and HBO Max announced WW '84 and the '21 slate, that number jumped to 12,6 million... That's just short of a 50% increase in subs, and $720 million in *additional* revenue Warner Media just added to their botton-line...

... In a month.

Not one of the movies has aired yet.

I don't think a second movie will be a problem at all.

EDIT: The ground has shifted. A lot... If Disney do the same thing it's a continental shift. All bets on traditional movie distribution will be off.
Problem is HBO Max is only in the US. So it may be a profitable venture for AT&T, but a pretty significant issue for most of the world's consumers if they don't access.

Judging from some of the visuals in the trailer this is the quintessential IMAX/big screen movie that took many years to be realised. It's a betrayal of sorts to release it on the small screen straight off the bat.
Imagine if they did the same with LOTR.

Nolan has expressed the same views.

Nolan's criticism is about quite a bit more than that, though.

Worth reading his interview here:

But more than that, the economics of it are unsound unless you're purely looking at movements in share price, number of eyeballs on the new streaming service. Theatrical is really only one part of what we're talking about here. You're talking about your home video window, your secondary, tertiary windows. These are things very important to the economics of the business and to the people who work in the business.

And I'm not talking about me. I'm not talking about Ben Affleck or whoever. I'm talking about the grips, the electricians who depend on IA [the International Alliance union] and IA residuals for pension and health care. I'm talking about SAG [the Screen Actors Guild]. I'm talking about actors. I'm talking about when I come on the set and I've got to shoot a scene with a waiter or a lawyer who has two or three lines. They need to be earning a living in that profession, working maybe sometimes a couple of days a year. And that's why the residuals structure is in place.

That's why the unions have secured participations for people down the line. So when a movie is sold to a television station 20 years after it was made, a payment is made to the people who collaborated on that on that film. And these are important principles that when a company starts devaluing the individual assets by using them as leverage for a different business strategy without first figuring out how those new structures are going to have to work, it's a sign of great danger for the ordinary people who work in this industry.
 
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Herr der Verboten

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I think Chapter House is my least favorite, not bad but not great either imho (so far). Seems that Dune was actually the first 4 books while 5 and 6 is the start of something else/new.
 

zerocool2009

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Problem is HBO Max is only in the US. So it may be a profitable venture for AT&T, but a pretty significant issue for most of the world's consumers if they don't access.



Nolan's criticism is about quite a bit more than that, though.

Worth reading his interview here:


Dont stress! Once released.... its available via torrents! Plan B
 
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