Blood Type Diet

porchrat

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#1
I have just learnt about this blood type diet thing. I had never heard about it before but our own killadoob brought it to my attention here.

As some information here is the wiki article on it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_type_diet

Do any of you out there believe in this sort of thing?

I have to say I find the idea to be very very strange.
 

copacetic

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#2
From what I can gather, there is not any scientific evidence for it, although I don't know much about it.

I am totally open to being convinced though, as always.

Evidence please!
 

porchrat

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#3
This is from the other thread. I have put it here to avoid further derailment.

Eish bro please go back one page and look for my reply to copa, i am not typing or re quoting, it is one page back not 10.

Copa picked the worst possible link for blood type related food diets, i don't think he knew dietitians use actual blood work done by labs and help determine what is good and bad for you, whether it is an exact science i don't know but having your blood work done can pickup certain things that can help determine what might be harmful to you but one page back bro.
What blood work exactly? (note you really should be able to answer this sort of question if you are recommending blood type diets)

It still looks very much like they are claiming that your blood type determines optimum dietary contents. I have never encountered anything that would indicate this to be true.Your blood type is for sure important when it comes to transplants and blood transfusions but as a determinant of dietary needs... yea I highly doubt that.
 

cbrunsdonza

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#4
There is no scientific proof or real world evidence that it works. I've read into this as I've tried it before.
 

porchrat

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#5
I don't have much issue with bloodwork possibly being able to detect various allergens (although I know nothing about this really).

This is not remotely related to the blood type diet we were discussing though.

The goalposts, I am struggling to follow them. :eek:
blood tests can indeed be used to detect what you are allergic to. They don't really detect the presence of allergens in your blood normally but you can have an allergy test done where they put your blood through a whole set of allergens that come on this neat little card thing that tests for a reaction.

In that way you can learn what you aren't supposed to eat... as you have already pointed out though this has nothing to do with bloodtype.
 

porchrat

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#6
There is no scientific proof or real world evidence that it works. I've read into this as I've tried it before.
Yea this is my take on it too. Nothing I have encountered so far would lead me to believe this stuff has a scientific basis. I'm surprised at the stuff people are prepared to believe in.
 

killadoob

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#7
This is from the other thread. I have put it here to avoid further derailment.


What blood work exactly? (note you really should be able to answer this sort of question if you are recommending blood type diets)

It still looks very much like they are claiming that your blood type determines optimum dietary contents. I have never encountered anything that would indicate this to be true.Your blood type is for sure important when it comes to transplants and blood transfusions but as a determinant of dietary needs... yea I highly doubt that.
Blood work you get done for allergies, they pick up certain foods that might not be good, so you may be allergic to dairy, wheat etc. The blood type stuff is interesting to read though. Haven't really got that far into diets. I just eat fruit alot and oats :D.

Well dietitians use your blood work done by a lab and create a list of things to eat and avoid, so unless i have been lied to and they are basing it on copa's i dunno but they ask for the blood work results. This is according to my sister and all the sites i have seen so i don't get why they would want your blood work if they didn't need it.
 

killadoob

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#9
To make their regurgitated crap seem more scientific ;)
Possibly but the according to my sister the list is very strange, she eat certain dairy items but others she must avoid and wheat is basically gone which is crap considering wheat is in so much of the food we buy.

Imagine being having a gluten allergy :eek:. You would literally need to become a vegan
 

porchrat

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#10
Yea you can certainly have blood workups done for allergies and you should avoid foods you are allergic to. That isn't the same as basing a diet off of blood types though.

Saying "don't eat pork because you are A+" is really strange. Do you honestly believe in this stuff?
 

HavocXphere

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#12
You can't convince anybody who bought into it that its full of holes - they just spent a lot of money on it & want to believe regardless of evidence to the contrary. I've also found out through first hand experience that pointing out that its full of holes achieves nothing beyond angering someone.

This being the internet though...

Blood work you get done for allergies
A solid allergy panel is going to cost you ~3-5k. Blood type diet plans costs about 1k. The number just don't work. No allergy testing.

i don't get why they would want your blood work if they didn't need it.
For the most obvious of reasons...to determine what blood type you are.

The only relevant blood test I can think of that you could squeeze into the budget is an inflammation marker test. If those markers come back high they'll take their standard list of foods for blood type XYZ and mix in a bit of this. ( <<That'll be R1000 please. Invoice to follow.) Its kinda sketchy though, cause the inflammation markers will come back high if you've got a running nose...
 

marine1

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#13
It without doubt has some scientific backing, I had the test done and they told me to stay away from wheat, dairy, etc etc.
Now how would they know what I already know makes me sick, bloated, allergic?

O+ blood type. I should be eating meats, not breads and fruits.
 

Sinbad

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#14
It without doubt has some scientific backing, I had the test done and they told me to stay away from wheat, dairy, etc etc.
Now how would they know what I already know makes me sick, bloated, allergic?

O+ blood type. I should be eating meats, not breads and fruits.
See now I also thrive on meats, wheat makes me bloated and yuck and fat.
And I'm B+...

So there may be factors in your blood that indicate allergies etc - but it certainly isn't your blood type.
 

HapticSimian

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#15
It without doubt has some scientific backing
It really doesn't.

I had the test done and they told me to stay away from wheat, dairy, etc etc.
Now how would they know what I already know makes me sick, bloated, allergic?
The same way a John Edward knows 'there's an "M" in the room' - it's true for many people.

O+ blood type. I should be eating meats, not breads and fruits.
"I know many "Type O" people who do far better on a plant-based diet than an animal based diet. In fact I don't know anyone who does better in the long run, health-wise, on an animal based diet. Also, when I first heard about the blood type diet, and I wanted to know if it had any validity, I asked myself if other mammals had different blood types (especially primates). For if they did, the fact that they eat the same diet would tend to invalidate D'Adamo's claims. Well guess what? They do have different blood types just we do. Maybe they should consider changing their diets too. Or maybe they're lucky that they can't read." - Don Bennett

Dunno who the guy is, but it seems a fairly sensible position on the issue...
 

Alan

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#16
Yea this is my take on it too. Nothing I have encountered so far would lead me to believe this stuff has a scientific basis. I'm surprised at the stuff people are prepared to believe in.
Well what's the alternative when science or more specifically the practitioners involved aren't bothered to try provide answers?
 

HapticSimian

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#17
Well what's the alternative when science or more specifically the practitioners involved aren't bothered to try provide answers?
How's about not being a spoon-fed, gullible, golden egg laying goose for quacks, for a start? :)

With the ease of access to information many of us enjoy today the answers to a great number of questions aren't nearly as hard to find as purveyors of woo would want you to believe.
 

Alan

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#18
How's about not being a spoon-fed, gullible, golden egg laying goose for quacks, for a start? :)

With the ease of access to information many of us enjoy today the answers to a great number of questions aren't nearly as hard to find as purveyors of woo would want you to believe.
I dunno anybody who said ulcers were caused by bacteria a few decades ago was a "quack". People are desperate and it's a bit rich to expect them to do nothing. Hell even if it's just a placebo effect that improves their health.
 

HapticSimian

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#19
I dunno anybody who said ulcers were caused by bacteria a few decades ago was a "quack".
Sure, but knowledge is cumulative; we know more today than we did yesterday, when we already knew exponentially more than a few years ago. You're less likely to be taken advantage of if you allow your stance to be shaped by experts' consensus. Admittedly you might just miss out on some bright spark's cutting edge idea/treatment/product/gimmick but you'll also not easily end up with [-]an I'm-a-****wit tag[/-] a PowerBalance bracelet around your arm.

People are desperate and it's a bit rich to expect them to do nothing.
Good thing that's not what I did then.

Hell even if it's just a placebo effect that improves their health.
In other words, 'what's the harm?', if I understand you correctly? Here's a start.
 

Alan

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#20
Sure, but knowledge is cumulative; we know more today than we did yesterday, when we already knew exponentially more than a few years ago. You're less likely to be taken advantage of if you allow your stance to be shaped by experts' consensus. Admittedly you might just miss out on some bright spark's cutting edge idea/treatment/product/gimmick but you'll also not easily end up with [-]an I'm-a-****wit tag[/-] a PowerBalance bracelet around your arm.
Still the fact remains people who saw the "quack" were cured.

Good thing that's not what I did then.
Good for you. Just don't demand that others do nothing if 'science' fails them.

In other words, 'what's the harm?', if I understand you correctly? Here's a start.
meh mainstream medicine kills people at an astonishing rate all the time. A professor told me 30% of patients who see IIRC neurologists for example are told they can't be diagnosed and are sent home. What are these people supposed to do? Rot away.

I've come across numerous people in my investigations who had they been left in the hands of mainstream medicine and 'science' would be dead right now and that's no exaggeration. If saving their lives means they're " spoon-fed, gullible, golden egg laying goose for quacks" so be it. I'm sure they can live with it.
 
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