Boeing wants to borrow $10 billion to survive "crisis"

Pythonista

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Whew ... if I had that kind of money, I'd certainly not be lending it to Boeing. They're not too big to fail ... altho' I suspect their military and space prowess might allow for US government bailouts.
 

ɹǝuuᴉM

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I love it. Airbus and Europe all the way EU rules the world. #IamPositive
 

Gaz{M}

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Can all the bean counters and criminal executives at Boeing now repay their salaries and bonuses for trying to launch a flawed, cheaply designed plane to save a buck.
 

powermzii

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Boeing will survive this - the market needs them both from an innovation and a supply perspective. Hopefully they have learnt their lessons when it comes to QA and cutting corners though. Unlike McDonnell and Lockheed there isn't another firm to absorb their commercial line so they will survive
 

lkswan747

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Well at least they are willing to borrow the money not steal it like our SOE's
 

garyc

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Looks like they may need bridging finance: https://www.flightglobal.com/air-transport/boeing-now-expects-mid-year-certification-of-737-max/136259.article
Boeing now expects the Federal Aviation Administration will certificate the 737 Max in the middle of 2020, marking another delay to the aircraft’s flight approval, which some industry observers had expected would come early this year.

“We are informing our customers and suppliers that we are currently estimating that the un-grounding of the 737 Max will begin during mid-2020,” Boeing says in a 21 January statement. “This estimate is informed by our experience to date with the certification process.”
Meanwhile:
The FAA says it has “set no timeframe for when the work will be completed”.

“The agency is following a thorough, deliberate process to verify that all proposed modifications to the Boeing 737 Max meet the highest certification standards,” the FAA says. “We continue to work with other safety regulators to review Boeing’s work as the company conducts the required safety assessments and addresses all issues that arise during testing.”
On top of all of this there is the emergency directive from the FAA to fix the GE90 engines on the Boeing 777 after the uncontained failure reported in anther thread.
 
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