Build a R3.3-billion broadband monument

rorz0r

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Holy crap, a New York penthouse is crazy expensive!
 

Gezza

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Why would they invest in something they do not understand? :p

The ANC is currently taking all credit for South Africa's broadband advancements. Even though had very little to no hand in it.
 

TJ99

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Yeah, build more monuments for the EFFers to fling ****/paint at. :D
 

MagicDude4Eva

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To be honest, they should rather spend that money on the improvement in healthcare, education and basic services (water, sanitation, electricity). I am failing to see how a 1Gbps fibre connection to a township will help if people continue sh*tt*ing into buckets and have been waiting for housing for the last 20 odd years.
 

Skerminkel

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Imagine what where we would have been if they did spend all the arms deal money on communication infrastructure! We would have been in a totally different league in the modern world economy.

To be honest, they should rather spend that money on the improvement in healthcare, education and basic services (water, sanitation, electricity). I am failing to see how a 1Gbps fibre connection to a township will help if people continue sh*tt*ing into buckets and have been waiting for housing for the last 20 odd years.

They already budget enough for all those. They are just really crap at spending it properly.
 

deweyzeph

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Why would they invest in something they do not understand? :p

The ANC is currently taking all credit for South Africa's broadband advancements. Even though had very little to no hand in it.

Exactly what advancements would those be? We're still stuck in the 2000's as far as broadband is concerned. There are no advancements to take credit for.
 

Gezza

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Exactly what advancements would those be? We're still stuck in the 2000's as far as broadband is concerned. There are no advancements to take credit for.

Broadband advancements in South Africa definitely doesn't mean advancements for the rest of the world too.

ANC took credit for supplying broadband to South Africa. Go do some research. If I remember correctly, they were against it.

People are usually scared of something they do not understand.
 

deweyzeph

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Broadband advancements in South Africa definitely doesn't mean advancements for the rest of the world too.

ANC took credit for supplying broadband to South Africa. Go do some research. If I remember correctly, they were against it.

People are usually scared of something they do not understand.

Actually Telkom was dead against ADSL because it basically completely decimated the market for their hugely expensive Diginet service which was the only way in the late nineties and early noughties that you could get "always on" internet.
 

porchrat

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Why would they invest in something they do not understand? :p

The ANC is currently taking all credit for South Africa's broadband advancements. Even though had very little to no hand in it.
This is simply not true. If anything the ANC led government has been actively impeding broadband advancements ever since they took power. So while they haven't had a positive impact they've definitely had an impact.
 

Peon

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There is currently no detail on how the government intends to roll out the network.

Sentance on the year? Its ok guys we can let it slide, all is well in the land.
 

Ant_Brooks

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To be honest, they should rather spend that money on the improvement in healthcare, education and basic services (water, sanitation, electricity). I am failing to see how a 1Gbps fibre connection to a township will help if people continue sh*tt*ing into buckets and have been waiting for housing for the last 20 odd years.

Some years ago (±1998), a colleague of mine was part of a research team which traveled to rural communities, to meet with local leaders. Their goal was to ask the community leaders what was the most important to them: electricity, water or phone lines. In almost all cases, the local leaders ranked a phone line as the highest priority. There was a consistent reason give for that choice. Armed with a working phone line, the community leader could phone his or her local government representative and ask "Where is our water? Where is our electricity?". Neither of the other choices is as empowering.
 

deweyzeph

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Some years ago (±1998), a colleague of mine was part of a research team which traveled to rural communities, to meet with local leaders. Their goal was to ask the community leaders what was the most important to them: electricity, water or phone lines. In almost all cases, the local leaders ranked a phone line as the highest priority. There was a consistent reason give for that choice. Armed with a working phone line, the community leader could phone his or her local government representative and ask "Where is our water? Where is our electricity?". Neither of the other choices is as empowering.

With our current government they aren't going to be getting any of these things.
 

MagicDude4Eva

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Some years ago (±1998), a colleague of mine was part of a research team which traveled to rural communities, to meet with local leaders. Their goal was to ask the community leaders what was the most important to them: electricity, water or phone lines. In almost all cases, the local leaders ranked a phone line as the highest priority. There was a consistent reason give for that choice. Armed with a working phone line, the community leader could phone his or her local government representative and ask "Where is our water? Where is our electricity?". Neither of the other choices is as empowering.

I don't think that this sentiment still applies, considering that this was pre-mobile phones and with mobile penetration so high, I doubt this is still the first priority. We did some non-profit work last year and my take was that nowadays people want "housing" from government and the term "housing" includes free water, electricity and sanitation - all of which is achievable, considering that municipalities already provide a certain amount of free water/electricity etc as part of basic services.

Did the CoJ project (http://mybroadband.co.za/nephp/1172.html) ever complete? I think Cape Town planned to spend 3bn Rand on a broadband rollout and CoJ announced a 1.5bn Rand rollout last year. Unless you can curb cable-theft and sabotaging public property, I don't think rollout of fixed lines will be a tangible thing though. SA tries to be first world, but yet has not even managed to fix the basic 3rd-world problems.
 

rpm

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Some years ago (±1998), a colleague of mine was part of a research team which traveled to rural communities, to meet with local leaders. Their goal was to ask the community leaders what was the most important to them: electricity, water or phone lines. In almost all cases, the local leaders ranked a phone line as the highest priority. There was a consistent reason give for that choice. Armed with a working phone line, the community leader could phone his or her local government representative and ask "Where is our water? Where is our electricity?". Neither of the other choices is as empowering.
Now this is interesting – thanks for sharing Ant. Is this research available anywhere?
 

Ant_Brooks

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I don't think that this sentiment still applies, considering that this was pre-mobile phones and with mobile penetration so high, I doubt this is still the first priority. We did some non-profit work last year and my take was that nowadays people want "housing" from government and the term "housing" includes free water, electricity and sanitation - all of which is achievable, considering that municipalities already provide a certain amount of free water/electricity etc as part of basic services.
I'd be inclined to agree. The fact that most people now do have access to a phone obviously reduces that in their priority order. While the pricing isn't where it could be, the penetration and coverage of the mobile networks in SA is excellent compared to 1998.

Of course, that doesn't change the fact that access to telecommunications is very still empowering for any community. There are also plenty of studies showing a correlation between investment in broadband and economic growth. There's an oft quoted claim (from a study in 2011, I think) that doubling broadband speeds for an economy can add 0.3 percent to GDP growth. I'm unfortunately ill-qualified to debate whether investment in "housing" has more or less impact on GDP than investing in broadband. I do know that investing more in broadband is unlikely to be a bad strategy for SA.
 
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