Can LED light bulbs damage your eyes?

Trust|Nobody

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#1
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I bought 2 Philips LED 5W light bulbs today.

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To replace my usual 14W Philips Genie bulbs.

The LED bulbs at 5W are about 35% brighter than the Genie bulbs at 14W. So that's fantastic.

But the LED bulbs are causing this incredible pain in my eyes. That's if I look at the bulb directly. Even after a few minutes my eyes are still paining. But I don't have this problem with the Genie bulbs.

Then I read this article stating that LED bulbs can cause irreparable damage to the retina:
https://gunnar.com/do-environmentally-friendly-led-lights-cause-blindness/

Anyone else have this problem?
 

Suspect99

Executive Member
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Aug 22, 2012
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#3
I also noticed that the LED bulbs stay cool to the touch during use, but the Genie bulbs get really hot.
Thats because they are more efficient. Less power is wasted as heat, therefore they can be brighter/the same brightness for less power.

Why on earth are you looking directly at your bright bulbs anyway
 

Trust|Nobody

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#4
Thats because they are more efficient. Less power is wasted as heat, therefore they can be brighter/the same brightness for less power.

Why on earth are you looking directly at your bright bulbs anyway
I was just admiring them for how bright they are compared to the old ones.

My eyes are still paining!

The other bulbs don't have this effect at all.
 

Geoff.D

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#8
The blue light issue is significant, but not sure about the facts.
I have tried to get lower wattage LEDs but have not found any readily available. 5 and 7W seem to be what you can get. Presumably, there would be an advantage to go for the warm version instead of the cold version?
 

supersunbird

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#9
The blue light issue is significant, but not sure about the facts.
I have tried to get lower wattage LEDs but have not found any readily available. 5 and 7W seem to be what you can get. Presumably, there would be an advantage to go for the warm version instead of the cold version?
All my internal LEDs are warm white, and the outside ones cool white.

It's not like most people were running "daylight" incandescents back in the day, so don't know why they like cool white inside.
 

Trust|Nobody

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#10
All my internal LEDs are warm white, and the outside ones cool white.

It's not like most people were running "daylight" incandescents back in the day, so don't know why they like cool white inside.
Circadian rhythm.
Daylight is alleged to be good for your circadian rhythm, it helps you sleep better.
Artificial lighting has the reverse effect.
That's why I choose the "cool daylight" - it looks closer to natural sunlight.
 

Geoff.D

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#11
I prefer the cool white in bathrooms, the kitchen, pantry and the garage, with warm whites everywhere else indoors.

Incidentally, I still have a few incandescents to use up, 60W screw type.
I resisted the CFL move for as long as possible. Have switched to LEDs in a big way though when the price was right.
Initially, LEDs were ridiculously expensive and the quality was pathetic.
Taken to the day-night sensor ones for use on outside lights that tend to be forgotten ON.
 
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supersunbird

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#12
I prefer the cool white in bathrooms, the kitchen, pantry and the garage, with warm whites everywhere else indoors.

Incidentally, I still have a few incandescents to use up, 60W screw type.
I resisted the CFL move for as long as possible. Have switched to LEDs in a big way though when the price was right.
Initially, LEDs were ridiculously expensive and the quality was pathetic.
Taken to the day-night sensor ones for use on outside lights that tend to be forgotten ON.
The PnP ones are great, because they do work in opaque light fittings, with a bit of on/off flickering though during switch over. They do not have a visible sensor, so best to mark them somehow, or else they look just like any normal one. I suspect the internal sensor is why they work in opaque light fittings, looking for something that they do not general, but the sun does.

PnP also have 2 x 10w and 1 x 20w LED floodlights for R99 each currently, fitted 2 10w ones for elderly neighbour at rear to light up back yard towards the veld, and 1 20w one to light up the front yard.
 

Captain Beer

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Jun 27, 2005
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5,103
#14
The blue light issue is significant, but not sure about the facts.
I have tried to get lower wattage LEDs but have not found any readily available. 5 and 7W seem to be what you can get. Presumably, there would be an advantage to go for the warm version instead of the cold version?
I got 3w warm white ones at ACDC Express. The lowest wattage I found there was 0.8w but those were decorative ones.
 

isie

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Jan 16, 2010
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10,073
#15
All my internal LEDs are warm white, and the outside ones cool white.

It's not like most people were running "daylight" incandescents back in the day, so don't know why they like cool white inside.
Im one of those - i much prefer cool white everywhere find it brightens up everything- I hate the orange glow of warm white.
 

Magnum

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#16
Do you get Lasers that can cut through wood, plastic and Steel. Its a LED! just the focusing that differs....
 

Geoff.D

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#18
Do you get Lasers that can cut through wood, plastic and Steel. Its a LED! just the focusing that differs....
The significant difference between LED and LASER lies in the working principle. LED emits light as the consequence of charge carriers recombination across P-N Junction, while LASER emits light as a result of photons striking the atom and compels them to release the similar photon. A laser works on the principle of stimulated emission and LED works on the principle of Electro-luminance.
https://electronicscoach.com/difference-between-led-and-laser.html
 
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