Can someone explain details about "DSP" versions of Windows?

Threepwood

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Aug 27, 2007
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#1
I understand it's like OEM but a little more expensive, no printed manuals or box like retail versions.

I read somewhere that OEM versions get locked to your Motherboard, therefore preventing you from installing the OS on another PC (or preventing a Mobo upgrade.)

Is this true of DSP versions? Only 'cos I want to know if I buy a DSP version and later get a new PC, will I still be able to use the same OS on the new PC?

The only way I can see that it would prevent you from doing so is if it marks your copy of Windows somehow when updating or something.

Can anyone verify and or explain please?
 

NetSpike

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#2
Yes DSP versions are like OEM, except they are actually designed for white box hardware manufacturers to sell Windows with their new computers that they assemble.

DSP, like OEM, is bound to the computer hardware - you cannot transfer the licence to another computer by installing it on another system, which isn't the original hardware with what you purchased with Windows.

Once you've changed your motherboard of your original computer, you need to repurchase Windows because you then essentially have a new computer.

I would suggest you just buy Windows again when purchasing a new computer because you'll have the latest version and downgrade rights if you still want to use a previous version of Windows on your new computer instead and use the new version when you're ready.

Windows Activation monitors your computer when new hardware is installed/removed. If 70% of your hardware changes it will ask you to reactivate your computer again. That is how Microsoft monitors if Windows is being installed on a new computer and if product keys are used for piracy by the number of times you activate your product key. You have 2 times to reactivate.
 
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Threepwood

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#3
So with downgrade rights I can buy Vista, and use XP untill I need Vista? How does this work? e.g. Where does the install media for XP come from in this case? Is it uncluded with Vista or something?

And 2 times to reactivate, does this mean with a DSP version I can have 3 computers?
i.e. I install on one PC and activate (1 activation), then get a new PC and re-install and re-activate (2 activations), then get a third new PC re-install and re-activate (3 activations.) Saying 2 times to re-activate makes me think it's 2 in addition to the first.

I just want to find the most long-term cost effective solution basically.

DSp Vista home basic is like R850, and retail is like double that as far as I know.

So taking the above into account, can a Retail version be installed on infinite number of new PC's? And how would this work without your copy getting blocked for being thought of as pirated (if you changed computers rather alot, probably won't happen but would like to know all the same.)
 
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The_Unbeliever

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#4
So with downgrade rights I can buy Vista, and use XP untill I need Vista? How does this work? e.g. Where does the install media for XP come from in this case? Is it uncluded with Vista or something?

And 2 times to reactivate, does this mean with a DSP version I can have 3 computers?
i.e. I install on one PC and activate (1 activation), then get a new PC and re-install and re-activate (2 activations), then get a third new PC re-install and re-activate (3 activations.) Saying 2 times to re-activate makes me think it's 2 in addition to the first.

I just want to find the most long-term cost effective solution basically.

DSp Vista home basic is like R850, and retail is like double that as far as I know.

So taking the above into account, can a Retail version be installed on infinite number of new PC's? And how would this work without your copy getting blocked for being thought of as pirated (if you changed computers rather alot, probably won't happen but would like to know all the same.)
No, you cannot.

Only one DSP licence per computer is allowed.
 

cryptic1

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May 9, 2006
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#7
Yes DSP versions are like OEM, except they are actually designed for white box hardware manufacturers to sell Windows with their new computers that they assemble.

DSP, like OEM, is bound to the computer hardware - you cannot transfer the licence to another computer by installing it on another system, which isn't the original hardware with what you purchased with Windows.

Once you've changed your motherboard of your original computer, you need to repurchase Windows because you then essentially have a new computer.

I would suggest you just buy Windows again when purchasing a new computer because you'll have the latest version and downgrade rights if you still want to use a previous version of Windows on your new computer instead and use the new version when you're ready.

Windows Activation monitors your computer when new hardware is installed/removed. If 70% of your hardware changes it will ask you to reactivate your computer again. That is how Microsoft monitors if Windows is being installed on a new computer and if product keys are used for piracy by the number of times you activate your product key. You have 2 times to reactivate.
I've got a DSP (Vista Ultimate), I've also re-activated a few times before I did an upgrade. Once I upgraded I had to phone in to re-activate cos of hardware changes. So ja the DSP can be re-activated as many times as u want - no need to keep buying windows.
 

Threepwood

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#8
Okay, so can anyone else verify that you can reactivate a dsp version indefinately?

And what about this "downgrade rights" thing?

Also is it the same scenario with DSP copies of Office?
 
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Andre

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#10
I think my XP version is DSP - came in a brown cardboard box. I've changed a motherboard and video card twice and completely re-installed once over the Christmas period and re-activated by phoning in twice.

Same with Vista, although that came in a plastic DVD case. Also did the phone in thing.

The automated phone system at MS asks you a couple of questions and you just punch the numbers on your phone to tell it that you are re-installing on the same computer and you are only installing the software on one computer and you will be all set.

A bit annoying but its all over in 5 minutes.
 

PCTECH

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#11
I think my XP version is DSP - came in a brown cardboard box. I've changed a motherboard and video card twice and completely re-installed once over the Christmas period and re-activated by phoning in twice.

Same with Vista, although that came in a plastic DVD case. Also did the phone in thing.

The automated phone system at MS asks you a couple of questions and you just punch the numbers on your phone to tell it that you are re-installing on the same computer and you are only installing the software on one computer and you will be all set.

A bit annoying but its all over in 5 minutes.
You have breached the terms of your EULA with Microsoft and I certainly wouldn't be bragging about that on an open forum :eek: You have just admitted to theft from Microsoft - nice one!

Microsoft OS EULAs state one copy per computer. Up to 3 major hardware changes are permitted then you are supposed to purchase a new COA. Major is defined as motherboard, HDD, CPU and RAM.

DSP copies of an OS are supposed to be sold with one of the above items of hardware and are bound to that hardware. IOW you may not use that COA if you remove the part with which came from your PC.
 

Andre

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#12
You have breached the terms of your EULA with Microsoft and I certainly wouldn't be bragging about that on an open forum :eek: You have just admitted to theft from Microsoft - nice one!
Nonsense.

Both motherboard and video card went back because they were faulty and were replaced by different brands.

Does this mean I have to buy new copies of XP and Vista? Nope, I don't think so.

Does changing the drive controller mode in the BIOS from SATA to RAID requiring an OS re-install mean I need to buy a new OS? Nope, don't think so either.
 

proximiti99

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#13
Nonsense.

Both motherboard and video card went back because they were faulty and were replaced by different brands.

Does this mean I have to buy new copies of XP and Vista? Nope, I don't think so.

Does changing the drive controller mode in the BIOS from SATA to RAID requiring an OS re-install mean I need to buy a new OS? Nope, don't think so either.
I say u keep a lookout for black choppers in your area ...
 
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