Cape Town’s water crisis day zero brought forward more than a week

HeftyCrab

Expert Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2009
Messages
2,292
According to the city’s weekly water dashboard, there was 1.4% decrease in dam water levels for the week ending 22 January 2018, meaning that the Cape Town is expected to now run out of water on 12 April 2018. It was previously forecast at 21 April.
Thats a massive adjustment.
 

krycor

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
16,538
I think it should just happen early. Much like the ANC, economy etc the DA and wealthy folk need to feel the inconvenience of having to collect water before they realize that no money will solve the problem.

Hoping day zero happens and 25-40% of Cpt population leave.
 

Nerfherder

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 21, 2008
Messages
25,479
I think it should just happen early. Much like the ANC, economy etc the DA and wealthy folk need to feel the inconvenience of having to collect water before they realize that no money will solve the problem.

Hoping day zero happens and 25-40% of Cpt population leave.
They need to make it so that day zero is not when we have no water.
 

The Trutherizer

Expert Member
Joined
May 20, 2010
Messages
3,321
I didn't really want to do this, but the levels of BS flying around are astonishing... If nobody else will then I will cut to the chase.

The major potable water dam levels in the WC are higher now than they were last year this time. Berg River dam (the big one), Steenbras Upper, and Steenbras Lower. It might rain less the coming year, or the same, or if we are really lucky then more. That's a given. But it deserved to be mentioned.

Right...

In the Western Cape agriculture is the largest user of water in the province. In both water management areas this holds true. Cape Town is served by the WCWSS - A relatively small sub basin of the Berg-Olifants water management area. In this small sub basin of course Cape Town dominates water use over the bit of agriculture that goes on here. Mostly wine farming. The Theewater and Brandvlei dams are PREDOMINANTLY for irrigation, and it's THOSE dams teetering on the edge.

Ok... Now let's look at the economy of the Western Cape.

Electricity and Water (1.5%)
Construction (4.7%)
Community, social and personal services (5.3%)
Transport, storage and personal services (10.1%)
General government services (10.1%)
Trade (14.8%)
Manufacturing (16.9%)
Financial and business services (32.3%) !! Oh but please don't flush the toilets even when potential multimillion Rand investors come to HQ - Let them "save like a local"!

Agriculture (only 4 fuskin %!)

So the second smallest of the 'large' economic sectors uses the majority of the water in the province. An industry that has been growing in production and export volume steadily at about 2.5% a year on average since the early 2000s. In an arid province. Exporting ever more or our water. Question: Is that economic contribution even enough to build a single large dam?

NB: 2016 - From a western cape government report.
"The agriculture sector in the
Western Cape is growing and, as
a resource-intensive sector, the
pressure it places on land is
notable and it is deemed that
most of the land under cultivation
in the Western Cape is not suited
to agriculture"

An industry that has historically (not just here, but globally) lived and died by the rainfall. It's practically a farming thing. And on land mostly not suitable for agriculture no less. It would be cheaper to skip the exports, and import our food from other provinces and abroad than to develop the Western Cape's water system to the point where it can sustain the agricultural growth it has in the past decade or so. And save all that water at the same time.

Cape Town on the other hand... You know that little place that happens to be a World Class City of over 3 million people - Employing the majority of them... Accounts for the lion's share of the 25% or so that the Western Cape contributes to the national GDP. Are they really... really?.. REALLY?!!? going to keep on prioritising agricultural growth over the well-being of the Mother City? Let one of the SMALLEST economic sectors in the province continue to use the MAJORITY of the provinces water, and expect the good people of Cape Town to bend over backwards till their heads touch their heels? For years? Kill the tourism industry?

No... Or if they do I will keep on hammering reality into any head in reach. The point being. They have to plan water reticulation so that the city enjoys priority and can go about big boy business like usual, while farming is limited to a level that can weather a severe drought like this one within marginal reason. This is not the UK, Canada or Japan where they don't know where to put all the wet stuff falling from the sky. We know where to put the bit we get - Into the Cape Town magic economic fruit tree.

Mic effing drop.

PS: I don't hate farmers. I really don't. When reality comes a'knocking though. I say it like it is. And for the record. Myself... I worked it out and I have always used less than 70l a day on average at home.
 
Last edited:

Splinter

Honorary Master
Joined
Oct 14, 2011
Messages
25,229
I didn't really want to do this, but the levels of BS flying around are astonishing... If nobody else will then I will cut to the chase.

The major potable water dam levels in the WC are higher now than they were last year this time. Berg River dam (the big one), Steenbras Upper, and Steenbras Lower. .
I believe you are spreading disinformation. Cherry-selecting various dams should be worthy of an infraction; given current conditions
 

The Trutherizer

Expert Member
Joined
May 20, 2010
Messages
3,321
I believe you are spreading disinformation. Cherry-selecting various dams should be worthy of an infraction; given current conditions
That was not the main point. They are from what I have been able to gather the major sources of potable water for the city though. If the information is wrong then it is only because you can hardly find any information on the matter and I have searched.

You can even calculate the current level of the berg river dam (54.0%) against it's capacity (127.1 million cubic meters), allow for 10% unusable, and some for evaporation. Divide the remainder by a generous 700megaliter per day consumption and come to a value very close to the current day zero projection. Keeping in mind that a cubic meter is 1000l and a megaliter is a million liters of course.

There is very little doubt that we are in dire straits and people should absolutely save water or they might very well regret it. I certainly am. I just had a poop and I finally flushed my toilet after letting it mellow since yesterday. However it is not entirely a mystery why we are now at this point even considering the lower rainfall. A relatively small industry is using the majority of the water in the province - And it has just kept on growing for a long time now and it's still tiny compared to the rest of the provincial economy.
 
Last edited:

Splinter

Honorary Master
Joined
Oct 14, 2011
Messages
25,229
That was not the main point. They are from what I have been able to gather the major sources of potable water for the city though. If the information is wrong then it is only because you can hardly find any information on the matter and I have searched.
The city gives info continuously on the dams. What exactly are you looking for?
 

Gordon_R

Honorary Master
Joined
Jul 5, 2009
Messages
13,178
What the dams are used for. Why the city as the major economic centre of the province was not given priority from the start.

There is so much bull**** in your comments it is barely worth a response. All the information you request has been repeatedly posted in the new sub-forum Water Shortage and Drought. A few minutes reading those threads would have been more constructive than all the typing done in this thread.
 

Polymathic

Honorary Master
Joined
Mar 22, 2010
Messages
18,173
I think it should just happen early. Much like the ANC, economy etc the DA and wealthy folk need to feel the inconvenience of having to collect water before they realize that no money will solve the problem.

Hoping day zero happens and 25-40% of Cpt population leave.
For the water crisis to spread to other regions?
 

The Trutherizer

Expert Member
Joined
May 20, 2010
Messages
3,321
There is so much bull**** in your comments it is barely worth a response. All the information you request has been repeatedly posted in the new sub-forum Water Shortage and Drought. A few minutes reading those threads would have been more constructive than all the typing done in this thread.
You can hardly expect me to have read through all the comments on 50 or so threads in a sub-forum I did not even know about. Oh I see there's one that is 264 pages of comments about the new water restriction tariffs which I know there was a **** storm around. And another that's 49 pages about rain and storm in CT. Great. And if I look at the topics then it would have been highly incidental if anything was written that I wanted to find out about. Forums are great for discussion, but not so much as reference sources. Almost all of it is opinion. As was my own post. You are lucky if the O.P. posted legitimate information to start with.

No I doubt the information I'm looking for is there. If you know otherwise then you can maybe provide me with references.
 

rietrot

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 26, 2016
Messages
21,152
I think it should just happen early. Much like the ANC, economy etc the DA and wealthy folk need to feel the inconvenience of having to collect water before they realize that no money will solve the problem.

Hoping day zero happens and 25-40% of Cpt population leave.
Wtf. Money does solve these problems. Money builds dams and infrastructure to store water. It facilitates trade so that we can have nice things like running water which is a paid for service. And the poor don't have it because they are to lazy to work and pay for the infrastructure.
 
Last edited:

The Trutherizer

Expert Member
Joined
May 20, 2010
Messages
3,321
I think it should just happen early. Much like the ANC, economy etc the DA and wealthy folk need to feel the inconvenience of having to collect water before they realize that no money will solve the problem.

Hoping day zero happens and 25-40% of Cpt population leave.
Of course money solves these things! For example if the whole of Cape Town did not chip in for the Berg river dam in the mid 2000s we'd have been trampling each other at the water collection points already. And national government at that time also refused to assist. Of course this time round most people are refusing to contribute even the cost of a happy meal a month to help the city, their home, out. So fat chance that's happening again.

All it requires is money. What do you think can solve it? People leaving? That's not how cities work!

We need support from government, or to stand together and bear the cost ourselves, or we need to start cutting back on water heavy industries. Simple as that - That's how reality works. Not sure but maybe we can get aid from the world bank - I doubt the government will let us though.
 
Last edited:

Gordon_R

Honorary Master
Joined
Jul 5, 2009
Messages
13,178
No I doubt the information I'm looking for is there. If you know otherwise then you can maybe provide me with references.
I could provide answers to all of your questions, and quote multiple sources. But I will not do so in the sub-forum that nobody reads, on a thread topic that is dead, and unrelated to the original post, with so much misinformation flying around.
 

supersunbird

Honorary Master
Joined
Oct 1, 2005
Messages
52,592
There is so much bull**** in your comments it is barely worth a response. All the information you request has been repeatedly posted in the new sub-forum Water Shortage and Drought. A few minutes reading those threads would have been more constructive than all the typing done in this thread.
So the fact that a small sector of the provincial economy uses the most water is covered in that sub forum?
 
Top