Cape Town ratepayers fume over City’s fixed levies on top of their usual bills

Currantly

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Cape Town - City of Cape Town ratepayers are fuming over the number of fixed levies they are paying in addition to their normal rates and services bill, accusing the DA-controlled City council of trying to circumvent steep rates and water increases to save face with voters.

Currently ratepayers are paying a levy for water, called a pipe levy, a prepaid electricity levy, and those with solar power, a small-scale embedded-generation (SSEG) tariff (for customers with grid-tied feed-in SSEG systems, such as solar PV) for what is essentially a free power source.

Deputy mayor and Mayco member for finance Ian Neilson on Tuesday admitted that the different levies are there to prop up the City’s coffers.

“What we saw particularly during the drought is that water consumption patterns have shifted; we love the fact the consumption patterns have shifted but we had to look at our tariff structure to see whether it is appropriate.

“We left our income streams at risk. If we didn’t have a fixed component then people would end up paying very little, even wealthy residents.”

Neilson said the fixed charges are for maintenance.

Linky
 

access

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Neilson said the fixed charges are for maintenance.

makes me think of e-tolls

where is teh money going that is already set aside for maintenance?
 

LazyLion

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Was in Cape Town last week for business.... was very impressed at how well run, clean and organised the city was. No sign of any trash, roads are painted and well maintained. Visible policing in many places, shopping and tourism was booming. In comparison Durban and Joburg are dirty $h!tholes. So my advice to Capetonians is... enjoy it.
 

Lucas Buck

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Was in Cape Town last week for business.... was very impressed at how well run, clean and organised the city was. No sign of any trash, roads are painted and well maintained. Visible policing in many places, shopping and tourism was booming. In comparison Durban and Joburg are dirty $h!tholes. So my advice to Capetonians is... enjoy it.
It's actually deteriorated over the last few years. Places aren't as clean as they used to be. If this is what impresses you and it's currently not that impressive, then Durban and Joburg must be horrible.
 
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YM_80

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Was in Cape Town last week for business.... was very impressed at how well run, clean and organised the city was. No sign of any trash, roads are painted and well maintained. Visible policing in many places, shopping and tourism was booming. In comparison Durban and Joburg are dirty $h!tholes. So my advice to Capetonians is... enjoy it.

Agreed. While many of us obviously take issue with these levies and the DA as a whole, the fact remains that CT is still a far more pleasant place to live than other cities in the country. And in terms of water, we are likely far better off than the rest...and if water infrastructure elsewhere collapses, guess which city is going to be the model to which others look?

I'm not saying I agree with the levy prices or how things are run - I don't know enough about that (and steer clear of politics in general) - but just on a basic, logical level, CT is far better run than most of the rest of the country. And that doesn't come for free.
 

YM_80

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It's actually deteriorated over the last few years. Places aren't as clean as they used to be. If this is what impresses you and it's current;y not that impressive, then Durban and Joburg must be horrible.

There will always be decay, but the rate of it varies. Durban city centre was fine back in my childhood - as was Cape Town; but Cape Town is still decent nowadays...can't say the same for Durban at all.
 

Mista_Mobsta

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It's actually deteriorated over the last few years. Places aren't as clean as they used to be. If this is what impresses you and it's currently not that impressive, then Durban and Joburg must be horrible.
Not sure when last you were in Pretoria central...can just as well be central Abuja or Lagos
Hell even Mombasa and Nairobi are cleaner than most SA cities
 

supersunbird

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It's actually deteriorated over the last few years. Places aren't as clean as they used to be. If this is what impresses you and it's currently not that impressive, then Durban and Joburg must be horrible.

They are, and in many streets in suburban Tshwane the road markings are now extremely faded and faint to invisible.
 

surface

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It's actually deteriorated over the last few years. Places aren't as clean as they used to be. If this is what impresses you and it's currently not that impressive, then Durban and Joburg must be horrible.
Joburg is absolutely terrible. Please don't think of coming here in case someone gets ideas. You might as well move to Syria by the looks of it.
 

Lucas Buck

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We hardly get paid here - just hand to mouth survival. Just don't come here. Also CT will be a country soon so part of EU.
lol!
OT: I can't believe that the CPT secession thread is still going. I keep waiting for the OP to say that he's misguided and it's KZN that will be seceding
 

noxibox

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makes me think of e-tolls

where is teh money going that is already set aside for maintenance?
What money is already set aside for maintenance? The money for maintaining the water and electricity infrastructure was typically part of the price charged for those. When people cut down the amount available for maintenance goes down. In the case of electricity Eskom are the real problem. They're the ones that drove supply down and prices up.

The funny thing is that Stop COCT scored an own goal when they opposed the drought levy. They converted a temporary fee into a permanent charge.

Regardless if the administration is mostly appropriately using whatever money they get, then there isn't much point demanding fees be reduced, because the money has to come from somewhere. If a significant proportion of what gets paid is going to an ever-growing number of poor people gravitating to the city, then you need a solution to that problem.
 
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