Cassini images show methane rain on Titan

Sugarman

Making Sugar
Joined
Feb 24, 2016
Messages
23,539
#1
Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, is a surprisingly dynamic world, with a thick atmosphere and surface oceans of liquid methane. Like the fictional land of Westeros in Game of Thrones, seasons on Titan last about seven years, and summer was due to hit its northern hemisphere in 2016. But strangely enough, it didn't seem to arrive as expected. Now, astronomers have analyzed Cassini images and found evidence of rainfall, indicating that finally, summer is coming.

titan-summer-rain-1.jpg

When Cassini first arrived at Titan in 2004, the moon's southern hemisphere was enjoying summer, and the spacecraft observed cloud coverand rainfall over that half. Astronomers developed climate models of Titan from Cassini data, which predicted that similar weather would be seen across the northern hemisphere as the seasons changed.
More At: https://newatlas.com/titan-summer-rains/58083/
 

Clive2

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 23, 2017
Messages
115
#5
Future gas filling station? :cool:
Something has always puzzled me about these moons and planets covered in potentially flammable / explosive gases or liquids, such as methane on Titan, Saturn, Neptune:
When an asteroid or meteorite enters Earth's atmosphere, intense friction causes it to glow, ignite, or explode.
So, when the same happens in a 'flammable' gaseous atmosphere, why doesn't the atmosphere ignite / explode?
Hope I'm not 'hijacking' this thread with the question - but as were talking methane anyway...
 

hj2k_x

Honorary Master
Joined
Jan 22, 2006
Messages
30,795
#6
Wish our moon looked like that
I wish all these awesome space discoveries would get more press than they do.

Kim sodding Kardashian has 120 million followers but I bet most of them couldn't even name the planets in our solar system.
 

C4Cat

Executive Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2015
Messages
7,732
#7
Future gas filling station? :cool:
Something has always puzzled me about these moons and planets covered in potentially flammable / explosive gases or liquids, such as methane on Titan, Saturn, Neptune:
When an asteroid or meteorite enters Earth's atmosphere, intense friction causes it to glow, ignite, or explode.
So, when the same happens in a 'flammable' gaseous atmosphere, why doesn't the atmosphere ignite / explode?
Hope I'm not 'hijacking' this thread with the question - but as were talking methane anyway...
Fire requires oxygen to burn or explode. Presumably titan, saturn and neptune don't have any
 

gamer16

Expert Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Messages
4,894
#8
The sea of methane just makes me think that's a massive fireball waiting to happen, does look amazing though.
 

Milano

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 7, 2004
Messages
10,971
#10
Future gas filling station? :cool:
Something has always puzzled me about these moons and planets covered in potentially flammable / explosive gases or liquids, such as methane on Titan, Saturn, Neptune:
When an asteroid or meteorite enters Earth's atmosphere, intense friction causes it to glow, ignite, or explode.
So, when the same happens in a 'flammable' gaseous atmosphere, why doesn't the atmosphere ignite / explode?
Hope I'm not 'hijacking' this thread with the question - but as were talking methane anyway...


Edit: oh nevermind already answered. Confirmed by NASA here:
https://www.nasa.gov/centers/ames/news/releases/2006/06_57AR.html
 
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