Chicken Curry

Polymathic

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Critical point that you have raised, struggled for years before I discovered "Up To Date" potatoes. They are slightly more expensive, and usually look terrible, but there is simply no substitute in texture and taste. Also, if you cut half of them smaller than the rest, the smaller ones will add that delicious creaminess that comes out in a good curry.
Yeah the regular more waxy potatoes have a nice shine to them. If I'm not mistaken UTD and Cape Douglas are one and the same, I very recently heard this.

I still have yet to find out what UTD really stands for.
 

wizardofid

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Jul 25, 2007
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Yeah look that's no Durban chicken curry

Durban chicken curry would be onion and tomatoe based. All cooked in one pot. Gravy soaking potatoes are a must. Peas are optional but lots of people enjoy it.
Yeah but you forget, durban curry doesn't fall into any of the Indian cuisines, for example korma, tikka, rogan josh, vindaloo ect.Considering Durban curries do contain beef. Considering Indian cuisine is devoid of beef, where as Pakistani food do contain beef, as their religious believe is different to that of india concerning cows.

Durban curry, chicken in particular in it self is a bastardization of vindaloo and vindaloo isn't a "curry" as it contains chili and tomatoes as the main ingredient of the dish.

Considering it being a bastardization in it self already, and not Indian because they do make use of beef, not widely, if you make a curry in Durban it would be a "Durban curry" in it self, as it isn't a seen as a Indian cuisine category either. So whether you use the addition of cream, honey, milk, coconut or goats cheese as a added addition or potato as long as you make it in durban it would be a Durban curry. In fact the addition of potato in curry in that region isn't Indian even, the addition of potato in a curry is of Malayan origin.

Is it authentic, no, you can pretty much do as you please with it as long as you make it in durban it would be for all intents and purposes be a Durban curry.
 

koogs

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Feb 17, 2010
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Critical point that you have raised, struggled for years before I discovered "Up To Date" potatoes. They are slightly more expensive, and usually look terrible, but there is simply no substitute in texture and taste. Also, if you cut half of them smaller than the rest, the smaller ones will add that delicious creaminess that comes out in a good curry.
Its difficult to find UTD potatoes outside Durban for those who like soft cooking potatoes in their curries. Having recently moved to Pretoria from Durban I had a hard time finding UTD potatoes.

I used to buy them at Nagiah's in Midrand as I was working in the area. Then I used the Sifrar variety as they are also soft cooking. But recently I found out that Lynnwood Housewifes Market in Pretoria East sells UTD potatoes so I am all good now. They also sell curry leaves and always has fresh dhania(coriander) if you want to make curries.
 

wizardofid

Executive Member
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Jul 25, 2007
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This made me hungry, and screw you guys busy making chicken curry and about to go make roti's......:mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad::mad:

Will be uploading pictures.......to mess with you guys.......
 

wizardofid

Executive Member
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And screw you guys

tomato, tomato paste, masala mix from pride of India, didn't use too much for a mild taste, and of course some roti's, if I had more time would have made buttered naan



715177
 

ShaunSA

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Confirmed by a farmer? I always thought some housewife saw UTD and made up their own name
Confirmed by just about everyone

FLOURY
(UTD – Up to Date, Caren, Darius and Avalanche)
This variety has a low moisture content and a high starch content. They do not retain their shape when boiled and are excellent for making mash. They also make the best chips and roast potatoes, which are crispy on the outside and soft and fluffy inside.

 

RonSwanson

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May 21, 2018
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Sifra, IMHO, couldn't ever come close to UTD, and in Biryani they are superb, the texture is heaven. And I agree that they make the best chips and roast potatoes too, stick em in the microwave and brown em in the Philips airfryer.

UTD FTW.
 

RonSwanson

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Its difficult to find UTD potatoes outside Durban for those who like soft cooking potatoes in their curries. Having recently moved to Pretoria from Durban I had a hard time finding UTD potatoes.

I used to buy them at Nagiah's in Midrand as I was working in the area. Then I used the Sifrar variety as they are also soft cooking. But recently I found out that Lynnwood Housewifes Market in Pretoria East sells UTD potatoes so I am all good now. They also sell curry leaves and always has fresh dhania(coriander) if you want to make curries.
I bought a bag from Carlwald Spar the other day, I think that the Spar and Pick n Pay in Boulders also has them. Any area where there is a high concentration of Indian people, closest to you may be Laudium if you are in Pta.
 

koogs

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I bought a bag from Carlwald Spar the other day, I think that the Spar and Pick n Pay in Boulders also has them. Any area where there is a high concentration of Indian people, closest to you may be Laudium if you are in Pta.
I am in Pretoria East as well so Lynnwood Housewife's market is very close to me and they sell UTD as well. Laudium is quite a drive for me.
 

ShaunSA

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This thread just illustrates that the very best and greatest curry recipes are family secrets. :)
Nah there's no family secrets when it comes to curry making.

The basics are all the same. The variations are endless.
 
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