Chivalry (or whatever it's called that guys are supposed to do)

grok

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Dec 20, 2007
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Ah the greatest lie of the century.
You're actually right, time to update my attitude in other areas too, from now on I'll punch a lady in the face for a seat on a lifeboat.
 

WorldWarIII

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You're actually right, time to update my attitude in other areas too, from now on I'll punch a lady in the face for a seat on a lifeboat.
child or baby better option , less chance they fight back
 

Hellhound105

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Jun 5, 2018
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You're sitting in a crowded room attending a talk. Lady (you don't know) walks in and there's no chair. Do you get up and offer her your chair, or do you ignore the impulse because this is some old timey nonsense?

No, equality is well equality.
 

Johnatan56

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Aug 23, 2013
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Yes, generally will not take a subway seat for example if only a couple left, I have no issue standing.
Have never had a case of someone actually going crazy about it, just thanks, no need or something. Admittedly have also never tried to take a trolley off someone, only asked if I could help if they're carrying a lot, never said anything along the lines of let me take that, always a case of ask for permission to help else it's awkward for that person if they can handle it fine. Also help guys though if they're carrying a lot, e.g. furniture up the stairs last week, and helped someone load out their washing machine of the apartment block down the road while I was passing by, have never had a bad reaction, only "all good, thanks for offering" as a worst. Austrian culture though, not New York or something. :p
 

The Trutherizer

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May 20, 2010
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You're sitting in a crowded room attending a talk. Lady (you don't know) walks in and there's no chair. Do you get up and offer her your chair, or do you ignore the impulse because this is some old timey nonsense?
If she's hot go halfies. If she's old, then give it to her otherwise you're making an old lady stand, probably hurting, while you're lounging comfortably.
 

The Darkness

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Sep 25, 2018
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I'd offer my chair to anyone I deem to be needing the seat more than I do - normally this would be an elderly person who looks frail. Otherwise, no, I'd never offer my chair to a female in these times. IMO females have cooked their goose. They hated on men, carried on so fiercely about equal rights etc. So no, now they can stand, they can open doors themselves and they can buy all the Gilette razors too. Funny though that I still see women tee-ing off at 'ladies' tee. Double standards are rife
 

Magandroid

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May 25, 2011
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Women have been fighting for equal rights and treatment to men for over 100 years. In the western culture they finally have it. Why would you disrespect everything they have fought so hard for. Before doing the "gentlemanly" (which frowned upon these days), ask yourself this ... under what circumstances would I give up my seat to male? Use that same circumstances for the female and it doesn't matter how "pretty" she is. Equal rights for all.
 

surface

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Oct 23, 2006
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You're sitting in a crowded room attending a talk. Lady (you don't know) walks in and there's no chair. Do you get up and offer her your chair, or do you ignore the impulse because this is some old timey nonsense?
I offer my chair if I am sitting. It doesn't matter who it is for. Many people need/want it more than me.
 

surface

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Oct 23, 2006
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No good deed goes unpunished. Chivalry is dead, unless it is my mother or sister.

Then you get the odd occasion where women, whichever age, insist on it. The world is not the same as it was 10-15 years ago.
In area where we stay, people seem courteous and do reciprocate with at least a nod if you show courtesy of any kind.
 

ShaunSA

Derailment Squad
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Sep 7, 2005
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If she's hot go halfies. If she's old, then give it to her otherwise you're making an old lady stand, probably hurting, while you're lounging comfortably.

Bullschit. Run a few park runs with that old tannie and you'll soon realise she's way more fit than you

And if she's a fatty well... standing is good exercise
 

Cius

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Jan 20, 2009
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Used to do it a lot, nowadays people take offence so easily. I would do it for elderly people, pregnant women perhaps. Otherwise probably not.
 

ShaunSA

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Used to do it a lot, nowadays people take offence so easily. I would do it for elderly people, pregnant women perhaps. Otherwise probably not.

Serves you right for assuming someone's gender
 

Fulcrum29

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Jun 25, 2010
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Come to think about this as common courtesy in general. At a certain mall in my vicinity, they usually keep the doors closed on windy days, and I am not too keen to always walk-through revolving doors since it is time-consuming. Anyway, so I would enter and keep the door open, it is being courteous, but nobody would actually relieve me, so all in all, I must be perceived as some doorman. Yes, you do get the occasional thank you, which is also interesting because when one person is being acknowledgeable, others will be reminded to also be kind.
 

The Voice

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Jan 25, 2009
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Parenting seems to be a major issue, because they're usually the ones who teach us manners.

Was queuing to get on a bus a few years ago in London. Wife and I are next to get on and some well-dressed ******** pushes right in front of us with his two little kids. No apology, nada. Kids learn a LOT from observing their parents, so can only imagine they'll think that type of behaviour is normal.

Queuing for a bus (again), there's a woman in front of me who's next to get on, and I clock some dusty youth and his mate in the corner of my eye about to push in front of her from the right. I extend my arm against the side of the bus, look him in the eye, and say "no, there's a queue." He apologises profusely, indicating he knew he was in the wrong, but just didn't care originally.

I never sit on the Tube, because it's usually too busy to get a seat anyway. As soon as a I saw a pregnant woman or an elderly person if I did manage to get a seat, I got up without saying anything and offered it to them. A couple of times I've had to tap a youngster or a man on the shoulder to ask them to give their seat to a heavily pregnant woman. They obliged without kicking off, thankfully, but how oblivious are you that you couldn't see the woman who's so pregnant that she's taking up the aisle in front of you?
 
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