Consumer Protection Act and 3 year prepaid data rollover

PPJ

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2007
Messages
396
So if you do not redeem it soon after issue, for what ever reason, the paper the voucher is printed on will be faded so bad in a few weeks the it would not stand up to any redeeming or scrutiny should that become necessary in the 3 year period.

Or hopefully you will just loose it.

Who would want to tie up a few rand for the future with a mobile provider?

Ok ....Ok there will be good reasons to do that........

Seems like in practice there is no real benefit to the consumer here. :)
 

markings

Expert Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2010
Messages
1,136
I see a great benefit to e.g. commuters who bought clip cards for bus travel. As I understand these things expired at the end of the week. So if someone bought 10 bus trips to get to work but became sick and were unable to, they effectively lost these trips even though they paid for it. With this rule that should be the end of this flagrant exploitation of the poor.
 

Ap0c

ParcelNinja CEO Justin Drennan
Company Rep
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
739
Vouchers

With regard to vouchers...

Most companies are changing the names from a 'voucher' to a 'promotion voucher' or 'coupon', which I don't think is governed.
 

psheldon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2006
Messages
364
Carbon_Fibre why do you say that? Because I found it very interesting, the bottom line is, the paper (or whatever) by law must be valid for 3 years. As soon as you put it into your phone (or whatever) then the 3 year period is gone.

I like the bus ticket example.
 

AfricanTech

Honorary Master
Joined
Mar 19, 2010
Messages
34,085
darn! and I was just ruminating today about what a swizz that practice is - and the fact that they use your current month before using your previous months' unused data purchase...

Hrmph!
 

Sash

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2003
Messages
125
This is interesting.

When I went to purchase my Virgin Mobile R99 texter earlier this month the person behind the till stated that it was only valid for one month. So basically based on this article Virgin Mobile are misleading customers into thinking they must use their voucher before they need to as it acutally lasts for three years.
 

squid66

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
128
Oh yes...

Probably a month from when you load it.
The co. I work for routes airtime vouchers from suppliers to retailers. There's a creation and expiry date field in the stock load file which comes from them which they can set to whatever is required. Ideally we should reject the file if the expiry date is less than three years. The problem with the date set on creation of the file is how long is the stock has been sitting on the 'shelf' before it is vended?

Keeping dates of short duration is a protection mechanism to stop errant stock from eventually falling into the wrong hands and so benefits the supplier.

I suspect the suppliers will keep short expiry dates for this reason, but allow refunds on valid non redeemed vouchers which fall within the 3 years of purchase window to cater for the new act.
 

Electron1

Expert Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2009
Messages
4,077
This is a real pity that the airtime will expire.
The consumer protection act should do just that -protect the consumer, but sadly it doesn't do enough, airtime should not be allowed to expire to suit the service providers.

darn! and I was just ruminating today about what a swizz that practice is - and the fact that they use your current month before using your previous months' unused data purchase...

Hrmph!
That is just wrong...
 
Top