Controversy hits new Afrikaans reality show Kwarantyn after a contestant used the k-word live on air

SpliceGold

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
762
Are any whities offended by those words?
No, I don't actually care what they call me. Me and my milky white skin with visible veins have accepted my geko like appearance and embrace it :ROFL:

I used to actually care about it because I was different. I always wished my skin was darker to fit in better. My family is multi racial but I was born with milky white skin while my siblings managed to inherit this awesome colour skin that has a natural tan. Yes I am still jelly till this day but I am who I am and we all love the differences in our colorful family
 
  • Like
Reactions: STS

Lucas Buck

Expert Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2005
Messages
4,300
I’m more surprised that the black guys were speaking Afrikaans. It’s mostly the older generation that does. You’ll hardly find younger black people speaking Afrikaans now. Unless this incident was 20+ years ago?
Black guys who I've heard speak Afrikaans have mostly come from outside of Cape Town originally. I've heard two young black guys in their early twenties conversing in Afrikaans during this year, not to each other though. One is the son of a colleague, he went to school in the Cape, not sure of the history of the other kid.
I would think that people from farming communities would be more likely to speak Afrikaans.
 
Last edited:

wbot

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2017
Messages
1,354
I’m more surprised that the black guys were speaking Afrikaans. It’s mostly the older generation that does. You’ll hardly find younger black people speaking Afrikaans now. Unless this incident was 20+ years ago?
My next door neighbours are young and black and their first language is Afrikaans. They're from the N Cape.
 

access

Honorary Master
Joined
Mar 17, 2009
Messages
10,562
I’m more surprised that the black guys were speaking Afrikaans. It’s mostly the older generation that does. You’ll hardly find younger black people speaking Afrikaans now. Unless this incident was 20+ years ago?
black afrikaners would not agree with you
 

access

Honorary Master
Joined
Mar 17, 2009
Messages
10,562
When I was younger we'd always insult people by calling them boskakkers. I'd be too scared to call something that now in case they misheard.
lol or a stoepkakker. the dutch are stoepkakkers with their weird toilets. gross.
 

Fulcrum29

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 25, 2010
Messages
34,206
There is nothing wrong with Afrikaans. Those who attack the language know that they are getting the Afrikaner panties in a twist, forcing a response. I remember when Maimane attacked Afrikaans, only to realise who his voter base is in the Western Cape, then he defended the language. Flip-flop.

Afrikaans is also one of those outliners where accent doesn't offend anyone, except for pronunciation which is the verdict at which side of the Boeregordyn you were raised.
 

Fulcrum29

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 25, 2010
Messages
34,206
I met a guy from Kimberley who's black as sin but spoke like he could be a newsreader.
From personal experience, most black people who are fluent in Afrikaans has a much cleaner use of the language in terms with pronunciation than the general Afrikaans native. As an Afrikaner myself, I appreciate that.
 

abzo

forum angel
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Messages
28,725
There is nothing wrong with Afrikaans. Those who attack the language know that they are getting the Afrikaner panties in a twist, forcing a response. I remember when Maimane attacked Afrikaans, only to realise who his voter base is in the Western Cape, then he defended the language. Flip-flop.

Afrikaans is also one of those outliners where accent doesn't offend anyone, except for pronunciation which is the verdict at which side of the Boeregordyn you were raised.
I wasn’t attacking Afrikaans. It’s just very unusual to see (hear) black people speaking Afrikaans. Most of the black people I know don’t speak Afrikaans at all. Flarsiep even corrected himself by saying he actually meant coloured and not black.
 

Fulcrum29

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 25, 2010
Messages
34,206
I wasn’t attacking Afrikaans. It’s just very unusual to see (hear) black people speaking Afrikaans. Most of the black people I know don’t speak Afrikaans at all. Flarsiep even corrected himself by saying he actually meant coloured and not black.
Who said you were attacking Afrikaans?
 

abzo

forum angel
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Messages
28,725
Who said you were attacking Afrikaans?
I guess since I started the whole “Black people speaking Afrikaans?!” narrative, I assumed it might have been referring to me but I see now it might have been a general statement and not related to the thread specifically.
 

Fulcrum29

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 25, 2010
Messages
34,206
I guess since I started the whole “Black people speaking Afrikaans?!” narrative, I assumed it might have been referring to me but I see now it might have been a general statement and not related to the thread specifically.
In my general point of view, the languages of South Africa (within the African context) belong to everyone. It is silly that we continue to play identity politics, dragging the use of language along with it. I do however support that the language medium should be demographically applied for curriculum and that English should be standardised for tertiary studies and examination except of course for private institutions.

Language shouldn't be forced on anyone, but there are standards which need to be upheld in the larger sense of communication. Choice is important, without choice we are birds clipped of our wings.

As said previously, our ethnic groups are having a hard time understanding each other. Addressing the spatial gaps within our society is a good starting point for this exercise. The longer we as a nation are divided the more we will condemn each other, and there is a lot going on at the moment which isn't helping to bridge this divide.
 

Swa

Honorary Master
Joined
May 4, 2012
Messages
24,516
Yes, I understand what you’re saying now. The word wasn’t initially derogatory. It was just a descriptor. Which is why I wouldn’t consider things like a k-boom, k-corn etc to have been “bad” words back then.

But k-pak is not the same, a simple exercise. Let’s replace k with “black people” and see what happens.

Black people tree - maybe the tree grew in certain areas and they used it for various things. Nothing wrong with naming it that.

Black people corn - they used the corn for various traditional meals. Nothing wrong here.

Black people melon - again, similar to the corn. All things they made use of. Nothing wrong here either.

Now to k-Pak, Black People Beating- what was this expression supposed to mean regardless of whether K was a derogatory word or not? Did they witness the Vendas k-pakking each other in Musangwe?

Similar to the way people use “porra-shower”. Even though porra could be offensive, if we change it to “Portuguese shower”, the meaning behind it is still offensive regardless of the word.
Pak has more than one meaning and not just beating. Heck even beating in English has more than one meaning.

It's significantly simpler, and easier, to not say the word than going though all the chaotic drama that its utterance stirs up.
Utterance implies unconscious. There are many people on this forum who would do well to read a few books on the human psyche. You'd be surprised how much of what we do or say is completely autonomous.

Agreed on that then. She didn't mean it in a racist way but it's still a racist word.
It is racial. A word is only racist if used in a racist way.
 

Swa

Honorary Master
Joined
May 4, 2012
Messages
24,516
I wasn’t attacking Afrikaans. It’s just very unusual to see (hear) black people speaking Afrikaans. Most of the black people I know don’t speak Afrikaans at all. Flarsiep even corrected himself by saying he actually meant coloured and not black.
If they speak Afrikaans they most likely grew up in the Free State.
 

abzo

forum angel
Joined
Nov 18, 2008
Messages
28,725
Pak has more than one meaning and not just beating. Heck even beating in English has more than one meaning.
I know. Pak could also mean a pack, like a pack of cards, right?

So perhaps a k-Pak is the collective noun for them? A pak of k’s.

Or it could mean to pack. Like how you would pack your bags.

So perhaps a k-pak is how you would load them onto, I don’t know, a ship*?

*Yes, I know they weren’t exported as slaves. They’re so lazy we had to get Indians to be slaves instead.
 

Swa

Honorary Master
Joined
May 4, 2012
Messages
24,516
I know. Pak could also mean a pack, like a pack of cards, right?

So perhaps a k-Pak is the collective noun for them? A pak of k’s.

Or it could mean to pack. Like how you would pack your bags.

So perhaps a k-pak is how you would load them onto, I don’t know, a ship*?

*Yes, I know they weren’t exported as slaves. They’re so lazy we had to get Indians to be slaves instead.
Those are only 2 of more than 5.
 
Top