Correct Use Of Inverter

PVX

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Jan 17, 2019
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Hi All

I recently got a Mecer 2.4KVA/1440W Inverter, together with 2 100AH Depp Cycle AGM batteries. I have a few questions about the correct way to use this system.

Currently my inverter is plugged straight into the wall (via surge protected plug), and then I have a surge multiplug connected to my inverter, which my laptop and TV are plugged into, as well as a 10 meter extension. When Eskom power cuts out, my TV and laptop are unaffected, I just have to switch my router from its wall socket to a multi plug which also comes from the same multi plug as TV and laptop. When Eskom power returns, the inverter automatically begins recharging itself.

So the way I understand it, is my inverter CONSTANTLY powering TV and laptop now, while also CONSTANTLY being charged via the wall (when Eskom is on)? Is this the correct way to do it? I don't want to adversely affect the life of the batteries if this is not the right way of wiring things up. The auto-switch over system is very convenient.

Also, what would happen if there was a long term Eskom outage, and the inverter batteries drained to 0%? Would they begin charging as normal when Eskom comes back on? Someone mentioned that draining to 0% would completely destroy deep cycle batteries, is this true? If so, should a user then just completely disconnect the inverter and shut it down once the charge gets to around 25%?

I guess I am just looking for tips on the best way to use the system and tips on how to extend battery life. The attached shows the display when Eskom power is on, when its off only the Output part on the right shows info.

Many thanks guys!
 

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download the manual, there are some settings you can change such as the cut off voltage, which will turn the system off when the batteries reach a specified voltage.

Do you have a fuse between your batteries and inverter though? the devices being constantly connected though isnt a problem, that is how it is intended to operate. set your inverters usage priority to SUB (solar/utility/battery - yes i know you dont have neccasarily have solar) but that way it will use eskom before the batteries.
 
download the manual, there are some settings you can change such as the cut off voltage, which will turn the system off when the batteries reach a specified voltage.

Do you have a fuse between your batteries and inverter though? the devices being constantly connected though isnt a problem, that is how it is intended to operate. set your inverters usage priority to SUB (solar/utility/battery - yes i know you dont have neccasarily have solar) but that way it will use eskom before the batteries.
Hi! The unit was pre-assembled, so I cannot answer regarding the fuse, its one big concealed unit, just a square box on wheels.

What about running Deep Cycle batteries to 0% though, does that destroy them?
 
Hi! The unit was pre-assembled, so I cannot answer regarding the fuse, its one big concealed unit, just a square box on wheels.

What about running Deep Cycle batteries to 0% though, does that destroy them?
Yes that would destroy them, taking them down to even below 50% drops their life span
 
Yes that would destroy them, taking them down to even below 50% drops their life span
wow ok....so in the event of a long term Eskom outage, unplug everything and turn the unit off completely?
 
So the way I understand it, is my inverter CONSTANTLY powering TV and laptop now, while also CONSTANTLY being charged via the wall (when Eskom is on)? Is this the correct way to do it? I don't want to adversely affect the life of the batteries if this is not the right way of wiring things up. The auto-switch over system is very convenient.

Most power trolleys are designed so that when you have stuff plugged in permanently to them, the electricy supply passes through to the devices when Eskom power is on. The batteries are only discharged when there is no charging coming through from the mains supply.
 
wow ok....so in the event of a long term Eskom outage, unplug everything and turn the unit off completely?
Yes in that case that would be the best option, you don't want your batteries down below 50%.
 
Hi! The unit was pre-assembled, so I cannot answer regarding the fuse, its one big concealed unit, just a square box on wheels.

What about running Deep Cycle batteries to 0% though, does that destroy them?

yeah you dont want to really go below 50%, you can adjust the setting as mentioned to a voltage which will *roughly* cater for this - something like 24.2V cut off
 
As already suggested, read the manual to find out what the unit is doing by itself and whether there is a setting available to limit the battery discharge to a value of 50%.

Do not start disconnecting components. Just switch off loads or at worst unplug the multiplug form the inverter system.

To answer the question about battery discharge, the normal absolute floor limit is 20%. Below that battery lifetime is seriously compromised and as batteries age, the chances are a battery will not recover once discharged below 20%.
What is the model number of your system?
 
Thanks guys, some really helpful info here. I have emailed their helpdesk team for the user guide, I can only find the Quick Start guide which doesn't really have anything useful, if anyone has a URL for same it will be greatly appreciated, thanks!
 
Thanks guys, some really helpful info here. I have emailed their helpdesk team for the user guide, I can only find the Quick Start guide which doesn't really have anything useful, if anyone has a URL for same it will be greatly appreciated, thanks!

on the inverter there will be a barcode with a serial number, normally on its right hand side
 
This thread is your friend: (But you'll need to take a week off work to read through it :laugh: ):

 
wow ok....so in the event of a long term Eskom outage, unplug everything and turn the unit off completely?

Or buy LifePO4 Batteries, yup. The unit auto powers down at 10% that is fine for lithium, not so much for Lead Acid.
 
this is literally a mecer (axpert) inverter on a trolley setup
I don't think so.

You get high frequency and low frequency inverters, some with transformers and some not.

Mecer and Axpert style (even the Voltronic) are Chinese made cheapies. Lucky packet...
 
I don't think so.

You get high frequency and low frequency inverters, some with transformers and some not.

Mecer and Axpert style (even the Voltronic) are Chinese made cheapies. Lucky packet...
What the hell is a high frequency and a low frequency inverter?
Maybe you should start a new thread for this topic, you are going to confuse the hell out of everybody.
 
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As already suggested, read the manual to find out what the unit is doing by itself and whether there is a setting available to limit the battery discharge to a value of 50%.

Do not start disconnecting components. Just switch off loads or at worst unplug the multiplug form the inverter system.

To answer the question about battery discharge, the normal absolute floor limit is 20%. Below that battery lifetime is seriously compromised and as batteries age, the chances are a battery will not recover once discharged below 20%.
What is the model number of your system?

I wouldn't take LA's down to 20% SOC if I had a choice, their life span is compromised already by going below 50% SOC.
 
I don't think so.

You get high frequency and low frequency inverters, some with transformers and some not.

Mecer and Axpert style (even the Voltronic) are Chinese made cheapies. Lucky packet...

ok i actually agree you are probably right this isnt the axpert style voltronic
 
I wouldn't take LA's down to 20% SOC if I had a choice, their life span is compromised already by going below 50% SOC.
Yes agreed, but then explain why the normal cut out DoD is 10%?
The answer is it depends on the batteries and what is important to the user. Longer standby time or battery life.
 
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