COVID-19 Antibodies - How prevalent?

How much of South Africa's Population has had COVID-19?

  • < 20%

  • < 40%

  • 50%

  • > 50%

  • > 60%

  • > 80%


Results are only viewable after voting.

neoprema

Executive Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
6,413
Ok, lets keep anything vaccine related out of this post. And focus on how many people have had it and thus have antibodies whether they are vaccinated or not. Since science tells us there IS a level of immunity, is it logical to conclude if we have had high infections counts we should see lower re-infections or at least lower hospitalization/death?
 

bwana

MyBroadband
Super Moderator
Joined
Feb 23, 2005
Messages
83,926
I wouldn't know if I've had it or not (despite Discovery's insistence that I probably have).

I'll take a test if you're footing the bill?
 

Geoff.D

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
24,982
Yup, you pay and I will take a test. If the test is positive you pay me a bonus. If the test is negative you pay me punitive damages for insulting me.
 

noxibox

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 6, 2005
Messages
21,471
I don't think anybody really knows, I don't think any of our thumbsucks will offer up anything useful. Also there is this flaw with antibody testing that nobody seems to speak about.

Is that the same test the UK is using to test for infection?

I suppose it is a flaw depending on why you want to know the numbers. If it is to determine who likely has some degree of protection against SARS-CoV-2, then the false positives may not matter, because the antibodies are expected to provide protection against related coronaviruses.
 

JustinB

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2008
Messages
1,076
Ok, lets keep anything vaccine related out of this post. And focus on how many people have had it and thus have antibodies whether they are vaccinated or not. Since science tells us there IS a level of immunity, is it logical to conclude if we have had high infections counts we should see lower re-infections or at least lower hospitalization/death?
All public information seems to suggest like a 1% reinfection rate, however the CDC is saying around 9% if I recall.
 

vatie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2013
Messages
429
Is that the same test the UK is using to test for infection?

I suppose it is a flaw depending on why you want to know the numbers. If it is to determine who likely has some degree of protection against SARS-CoV-2, then the false positives may not matter, because the antibodies are expected to provide protection against related coronaviruses.
Not the same test no, that is the rapid lateral flow test. Also, as for related coronavirusses offering up some protection there is very little info out there. I remember reading a study some months back saying there is some neutralizing activity but it was substantially weaker when compared to covid-19 antibodies. So how much it will help is really an open question not an expectation.
 

noxibox

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 6, 2005
Messages
21,471
It seems to be protective against severe illness, so that is good enough. Even immune memory from old SARS infections has some protective benefit. Enough to make a difference.

Still in the end it is what we have and it is going to have to do.

Not the same test no, that is the rapid lateral flow test.
So what are the technical differences between that immunochromatographic assay and the rapid tests being referred to in the Lancet? The article is old though, so maybe the tests have been improved and I'd expect that then the test used in South Africa would also be more reliable.
 
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