COVID-19 - Western Cape versus Gauteng

Gordon_R

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Winde said the lockdown regulations had caused "pandemic number two" - the economic catastrophe it had induced. The Western Cape now urgently needed a "differentiated" approach to the national regulations - to unlock the opening up of economic sectors currently battling to survive.

These included the wine and tourism industries in particular.
In the premier's weekly online digicon, the province's Health Department head Dr Keith Cloete reported that Covid-19 deaths in the Western Cape was now "plateauing" and even dropping. This could be seen by an assessment of both "actual deaths", and once potentially undetected deaths that had been factored in.
 

Chris_the_Brit

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Lots of spare capacity :love:

At a briefing on Wednesday, provincial health department head Keith Cloete said that in the past two weeks the demand for testing, the test positivity rate – the percentage of positive results among those processed – and the number of hospitalisations in both the public and the private sector had all decreased.

The amount of oxygen used had also fallen, and the number of reported deaths had stabilised and showed signs of easing.

Public hospitals over the past two weeks have been on average 71% full, with room to spare in ICUs at the two biggest hospitals, Groote Schuur and Tygerberg, which are running at 80% capacity. In preparation for the epidemic, the Western Cape built five additional facilities in Cape Town alone.

All of these are at present well below capacity, with the 862-bed facility at the Cape Town International Convention Centre having 139 patients and the 338-bed facility at Brackengate with 17 patients. The 60-bed Thusong Centre in Khayelitsha has 21 patients.

A temporary mass storage facility that was built to accommodate 624 bodies has nine.
 

R13...

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Lots of spare capacity :love:
They seem to have overprovisioned by large margins. And that's not a bad thing in an epidemic you know so little about. Better to have spare and not need than need it and not have any, as the likes of GP did instead focusing on spending the emergency funds enriching cadres.
 

Geoff.D

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They seem to have overprovisioned by large margins. And that's not a bad thing in an epidemic you know so little about. Better to have spare and not need than need it and not have any, as the likes of GP did instead focusing on spending the emergency funds enriching cadres.
Ja agree in principle that in this case over provision is better than under. BUT there was no need to go that far over. And that was driven by the completely out of the park official models. Could have just as easily used the PANDA model with a conscious calculated over provision allowance and achieved the same outcome.
 

Grant

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They seem to have overprovisioned by large margins. And that's not a bad thing in an epidemic you know so little about. Better to have spare and not need than need it and not have any, as the likes of GP did instead focusing on spending the emergency funds enriching cadres.
My thinking is wc should consider redeploying resources to areas that are struggling - our ec neighbors for example.
It would be the right thing to do, as well as further protect wc.
 

Chris_the_Brit

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Ja agree in principle that in this case over provision is better than under. BUT there was no need to go that far over. And that was driven by the completely out of the park official models. Could have just as easily used the PANDA model with a conscious calculated over provision allowance and achieved the same outcome.
I think this indicates the thinking behind that:

Premier Alan Winde said the province had made a massive effort to ensure that it had enough resources.

"We always said we want to be conservative and make sure we were not going to run out of space. We did not want to see people in hospital car parks unable to find beds or lining the corridors of our hospitals.

"At the time [we started] we were seeing horrific visuals of coffins piling up in Italy and we said we didn’t want to see that either," he said.
 
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Azg

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They seem to have overprovisioned by large margins. And that's not a bad thing in an epidemic you know so little about. Better to have spare and not need than need it and not have any, as the likes of GP did instead focusing on spending the emergency funds enriching cadres.
True the WC over provisioned. All remaining patients will be moved from the CTICC field hospital to Brackengate field hospital by 31 August. The CTICC field hospital will then be decommissioned by middle of September, unless there is an agreement in place to use it for patients from other provinces.

Better to have been over prepared than the clusterf*ck that is the EC. (Probably what follows next is a huge outcry over wasted / fruitless expenditure) on the temporary COVID-19 facilities).
 

noxibox

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Better to have been over prepared than the clusterf*ck that is the EC. (Probably what follows next is a huge outcry over wasted / fruitless expenditure) on the temporary COVID-19 facilities).
Or some sort of accusation of privilege and racism.
 

Geoff.D

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No, the CITCC wants its property back for the next season of conferences etc. So the move makes sense to shift patients to other places IF the demand for beds is dropping.
There is no fear that the current hospital will be used by other provinces. The equipment however could be re-deployed if nec, although, I think WC will be very foolish to do that.
 

Azg

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No, the CITCC wants its property back for the next season of conferences etc. So the move makes sense to shift patients to other places IF the demand for beds is dropping.
There is no fear that the current hospital will be used by other provinces. The equipment however could be re-deployed if nec, although, I think WC will be very foolish to do that.
No. The demand for beds is such that there is no need for two facilities to cater for the Western Cape only. Medical staff advised that the Brackengate facility is better designed and closer to the patient catchment areas hence the decision to close the CTICC facility.

There is no "season of conferences" with the current ban on events.

It's not a "fear that the CTICC will be used by other provinces". It is something that was actively discussed at high level by the provinces and national government would have foot the bill had that proposal gone ahead.

The current plan is that the last patient leaves CTICC on 31 August. From 1 Sept to 20 September the facility will be decontaminated, decommissioned and as much of the equipment and infrastructure as possible removed and stored for reuse elsewhere in the WC. All dependent on there being no unforseen events.
 

Geoff.D

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No. The demand for beds is such that there is no need for two facilities to cater for the Western Cape only. Medical staff advised that the Brackengate facility is better designed and closer to the patient catchment areas hence the decision to close the CTICC facility.

There is no "season of conferences" with the current ban on events.

It's not a "fear that the CTICC will be used by other provinces". It is something that was actively discussed at high level by the provinces and national government would have foot the bill had that proposal gone ahead.

The current plan is that the last patient leaves CTICC on 31 August. From 1 Sept to 20 September the facility will be decontaminated, decommissioned and as much of the equipment and infrastructure as possible removed and stored for reuse elsewhere in the WC. All dependent on there being no unforseen events.
You really have a very poor understanding of what I said.

But yes what you describe makes sense.

There is no need to keep the CITCC from returning to its normal function if the LD is lifted.
The "fear" I was referring to is that OTHER provinces will send patients to CT -- they won't, politically, that will never be acceptable to the ANC cadres.
My reference to redeployment referred to WC giving up its resources to other provinces --- they should keep it for their own use wherever it is required.
 

Geoff.D

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Just interested at what people are going to or have done since the subscription option is available.
As to the article, WC is again leading the way as to the next logical approach to the way forward.
 

Chris_the_Brit

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Current utilisation levels of field hospitals:

The pandemic was believed to have passed its peak, with metro hospitals 69% full, down from 71% the week before (all patients).

In addition, at the field hospitals: the Hospital of Hope at the Cape Town International Convention Centre, with 800 beds, had 91 patients admitted; the Brackengate Field Hospital, with a capacity of over 330 beds, had 47 patients admitted; and, the Thusong Centre, with a capacity of 60 beds, had 20 patients admitted.
 

Chris_the_Brit

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MSF Thusong Hospital to close:

Yesterday was the last day for new admissions to the Thusong field hospital in Khayelitsha, being operated by Medicins Sans Frontiers. The organization will now be extending its support to other provinces where cases are increasing and their services will have a greater impact.

This hospital and all of the people who were involved in building and operating it, have been invaluable in our fight against COVID-19 in this province and we thank everyone who has played a part in saving lives there. This entire project has been the result of a partnership between MSF, the Western Cape Government, and the City of Cape Town who provided the building. These kinds of partnerships have been valuable throughout our COVID-19 response, but also demonstrate what is possible when we combine forces to tackle problems.

The hospital, which opened its doors on 1 June, has admitted 241 people over the past two months. It has worked closely with the Khayelitsha Hospital, providing an invaluable service to the people of Khayelitsha.

New infections in Khayelitsha have shown a decline in recent weeks. The recovery rate in Khayelitsha currently stands at over 90% and between the Khayelitsha hospital, and the Brackengate temporary facility, we will still be able to accept and care for patients as necessary.
2nd field hospital to close (after the announced closure of the CTICC one by end of August)
 
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