Cuban engineers land in SA to help with service delivery

HavocXphere

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Thanks but I'll rather take a genuine SA engineer (any colour will do) over a freakin Cuban. Nothing against Cubans but introducing foreigners to engineering projects can create a big mess if language barriers etc aren't handled very carefully.
 

azbob

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Do these poor Cubans know what they're getting themselves into? Being stuck in the FS for two years!
 

Skerminkel

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These are only the FS ones. The Water Affairs ones have been around for a while (twiddling thumbs, from what I hear)
 

Arthur

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Yep. They'd rather use buddies from the Great Liberation Struggle than white South Africans.

But that's ok. Soon the Cubans will realise just what the problem is, and they won't be able to fix it.
 

Space_Chief

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Yep. They'd rather use buddies from the Great Liberation Struggle than white South Africans.

But that's ok. Soon the Cubans will realise just what the problem is, and they won't be able to fix it.

Yup pity about that. Oh well foreign countries benefit from home grown SA talent while we import people.
 

MagicDude4Eva

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Hear about this about 6 months ago on 702. AFAIK, the Cuban engineers are not recognised by SAQA, the SA engineering council and I think not even recognised by international standards. The cost of employing the 40 odd Cubans was projected to be about R50m/per year and there was discussion that the contracts would only last 2 years.

I am not sure how quickly those Cubans (language barrier aside) would be able to become productive, but I tend to think that R50m (equates to R1,2m per engineer) would have been better spent by employing local skill-set. Why is BEE not an issue in this case? Surely it would have been possible to contract out retired/retrenched non-BEE engineers for substantially less?

FWIW - the Cubans do not seem to be recognised by the "Washington Accord" (http://www.ieagreements.org/washington-accord/) - no clue what this means. Cuba also does not have a "sterling" history in water- & sanitation management, so not quite sure that those Cuban engineers will add value to this country. i.e. would they actually have experience with acid mine water treatment which is specific to our country?
 
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rrh

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Hear about this about 6 months ago on 702. AFAIK, the Cuban engineers are not recognised by SAQA, the SA engineering council and I think not even recognised by international standards. The cost of employing the 40 odd Cubans was projected to be about R50m/per year and there was discussion that the contracts would only last 2 years.

I am not sure how quickly those Cubans (language barrier aside) would be able to become productive, but I tend to think that R50m (equates to R1,2m per engineer) would have been better spent by employing local skill-set. Why is BEE not an issue in this case? Surely it would have been possible to contract out retired/retrenched non-BEE engineers for substantially less?

FWIW - the Cubans do not seem to be recognised by the "Washington Accord" (http://www.ieagreements.org/washington-accord/) - no clue what this means. Cuba also does not have a "sterling" history in water- & sanitation management, so not quite sure that those Cuban engineers will add value to this country. i.e. would they actually have experience with acid mine water treatment which is specific to our country?

Do the towns have the budget for [the new developments required for] service delivery ?
 

Mister 45

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Do these poor Cubans know what they're getting themselves into? Being stuck in the FS for two years!

I've been stuck here for 17 years.
Water provision is a best effort service.
Electricity works great if the municipality "remembers" to pay Eskom.
ADSL maxes out @ 4mbit.
But...
Still better than Jo'burg.
 
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garyc

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The University Engineering faculties that I deal with have a problem with some students emigrating after graduation. This can include top academic achievers. A common reason is that they can not find work in South Africa despite the skills shortage. Would it not be better to allow them to stay rather than bringing in foreigners?

As MagicDude said the Cubans are not even recognized as Engineers in this country and will not be able to work independently as such.
 

Vrotappel

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I assume this is part of the African Agenda.

Chase away local talent, import unaccredited foreigners. Profit.
 

MagicDude4Eva

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I assume this is part of the African Agenda.

Chase away local talent, import unaccredited foreigners. Profit.

I have always thought if there is not another agenda from the SA Engineering Council - perhaps engineers are paid really well in the private sector and hence the "skills-shortage" in government positions? Who knows, maybe engineers in the private sector are overpaid? Can't really comment on the engineering sector, but when looking at IT positions in government vs private sector, I found that highly skilled people get paid more in government.

I guess the Cuban engineer programme will have the same mediocre outcome as we had with those Cuban doctors.
 

Ancalagon

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The University Engineering faculties that I deal with have a problem with some students emigrating after graduation. This can include top academic achievers. A common reason is that they can not find work in South Africa despite the skills shortage. Would it not be better to allow them to stay rather than bringing in foreigners?

As MagicDude said the Cubans are not even recognized as Engineers in this country and will not be able to work independently as such.

I think perhaps most of us underestimate how much the ANC hates white people.
 

krycor

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Hear about this about 6 months ago on 702. AFAIK, the Cuban engineers are not recognised by SAQA, the SA engineering council and I think not even recognised by international standards. The cost of employing the 40 odd Cubans was projected to be about R50m/per year and there was discussion that the contracts would only last 2 years.

I am not sure how quickly those Cubans (language barrier aside) would be able to become productive, but I tend to think that R50m (equates to R1,2m per engineer) would have been better spent by employing local skill-set. Why is BEE not an issue in this case? Surely it would have been possible to contract out retired/retrenched non-BEE engineers for substantially less?

FWIW - the Cubans do not seem to be recognised by the "Washington Accord" (http://www.ieagreements.org/washington-accord/) - no clue what this means. Cuba also does not have a "sterling" history in water- & sanitation management, so not quite sure that those Cuban engineers will add value to this country. i.e. would they actually have experience with acid mine water treatment which is specific to our country?

You do realise that in Sa, there a lot of 'engineers' who have not studied engineering at varsity? we not even talking technicians as engineers. As much as the Engineering Council of SA should be policing things, they really aren't. Typically businesses get around this fact by having a few proper engineers sign off on things after.

Just wait until nurse start performing mini operations..
 

MagicDude4Eva

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You do realise that in Sa, there a lot of 'engineers' who have not studied engineering at varsity? we not even talking technicians as engineers. As much as the Engineering Council of SA should be policing things, they really aren't. Typically businesses get around this fact by having a few proper engineers sign off on things after.

Just wait until nurse start performing mini operations..

Yes, when I refer to engineers, I disregard almost all "software-/computer-/linux-/cloud-engineers" - most of those are unable to apply scientific knowledge/mathematics (i.e. the core of engineering). I am really failing to understand how the Cuban engineers, which specifically are brought in to deal with water-supply/treatment and various sanitation problems could add any value to this country. AFAIK, Cuba does not have a good track-record when it comes to the supply of basic services, and I think if we lack the local knowledge/skills, we should have worked with countries having similar issues pick any middle eastern country where water is scarce or where water pollution is high).
 
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