Cyclone Kenneth likely to hit Tanzania, Mozambique this week

SaiyanZ

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2008
Messages
7,202
#41
https://www.windy.com/

Scary stuff. is it just me or does it look like a 3'rd one is busy forming?
First time I'm seeing this website. What's scary for me are those regions in the southern oceans close to Antartica with wind speeds over 100km/hr. There's one large patch directly south of South Africa with 100km/hr wind speeds and the area it covers is the size of SA.

Oceans look scary.
 

Gordon_R

Executive Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2009
Messages
6,396
#42
First time I'm seeing this website. What's scary for me are those regions in the southern oceans close to Antartica with wind speeds over 100km/hr. There's one large patch directly south of South Africa with 100km/hr wind speeds and the area it covers is the size of SA.

Oceans look scary.
Average wind speeds are highest where the temperature gradients are strongest. The coast of Antarctica is one such place. The opposite is true of the tropics (except for cyclones), and the center of continental landmasses. In general summer winds tend to be less strong than in winter (except for the South Easter in Cape Town!)

There are nicknames for latitudes in the Southern Ocean:
Roaring Forties, Furious Fifties, and Screaming Sixties.
See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roaring_Forties
 

AstroTurf

Lucky Shot
Joined
May 13, 2010
Messages
27,079
#45
First time I'm seeing this website. What's scary for me are those regions in the southern oceans close to Antartica with wind speeds over 100km/hr. There's one large patch directly south of South Africa with 100km/hr wind speeds and the area it covers is the size of SA.

Oceans look scary.
Without those winds, we all be dead but yea I would not want to experience them first hand...
 

Geoff.D

Executive Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
9,896
#46
I took a trip once on a small ship used to supply Tristan de Cunha with goods and passenger services from CT in July.
It is one of the scariest things I have ever done. The storms the winds and the size of swells and waves on that portion of the ocean have to be experienced to be believed.
The vessel is a fishing vessel and fish factory ship during the fishing season. Virtually no stabilisers because these would foul the nets.

One night, after rolling back and forth in my bunk, I got up and went to talk to the officer on watch on the bridge.
Full moon, clear skies just after we had passed through a low-pressure ridge, probably in the centre of the low-pressure cell. Those black water swells towered over the vessel and looked like table mountain was going to fall on the boat. The boat was corkscrewing its way at an engine speed of 14 knots but making less than 1 knot on course.
One huge swell came at us frothing at the top The guy at the wheel frantically spun the wheel but nothing he did made any difference. The vessel leaned over until we were all standing on the side of the bridge hanging on for dear life. When it was all over and the wave had passed, I asked the officer on duty just how far over the boat could go, and all he said was " not much further". I will never forget that mountain of pitch black water approaching the boat and the water breaking over the entire boat we were buried under the water for a good few minutes. Or, that was what it looked like. Decided that yachtsmen are completely crazy.
.
 

AstroTurf

Lucky Shot
Joined
May 13, 2010
Messages
27,079
#47
I took a trip once on a small ship used to supply Tristan de Cunha with goods and passenger services from CT in July.
It is one of the scariest things I have ever done. The storms the winds and the size of swells and waves on that portion of the ocean have to be experienced to be believed.
The vessel is a fishing vessel and fish factory ship during the fishing season. Virtually no stabilisers because these would foul the nets.

One night, after rolling back and forth in my bunk, I got up and went to talk to the officer on watch on the bridge.
Full moon, clear skies just after we had passed through a low-pressure ridge, probably in the centre of the low-pressure cell. Those black water swells towered over the vessel and looked like table mountain was going to fall on the boat. The boat was corkscrewing its way at an engine speed of 14 knots but making less than 1 knot on course.
One huge swell came at us frothing at the top The guy at the wheel frantically spun the wheel but nothing he did made any difference. The vessel leaned over until we were all standing on the side of the bridge hanging on for dear life. When it was all over and the wave had passed, I asked the officer on duty just how far over the boat could go, and all he said was " not much further". I will never forget that mountain of pitch black water approaching the boat and the water breaking over the entire boat we were buried under the water for a good few minutes. Or, that was what it looked like. Decided that yachtsmen are completely crazy.
.
Went snoek fishing with a friend that did it for a living. Never again, I do not like mountains made of water.
 

ponder

Honorary Master
Joined
Jan 22, 2005
Messages
74,658
#48
I took a trip once on a small ship used to supply Tristan de Cunha with goods and passenger services from CT in July.
I kinda feel sorry for the people there as they are pretty much stuck there, wonder how many would leave for the UK if they could, especially the younger ones.
 
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