Diesel emissions scandal: VW fined €1bn by German prosecutors

Sugarman

Making Sugar
#1
Car giant Volkswagen has been fined €1bn (£880m) by German prosecutors over its diesel emissions scandal.

The Braunschweig public prosecutor found VW had sold more than 10 million cars between mid-2007 and 2015 that had emissions-test-cheating software installed.

The car firm said it did not plan to appeal against the fine.

VW said it had admitted "its responsibility for the diesel crisis".

The fine is one of the highest ever imposed by German authorities against a company.

VW chief executive Herbert Diess said by accepting the fine "Volkswagen takes responsibility for the diesel crisis,"

"Further steps are necessary to restore trust in the company and the auto industry," he added.

The fine in Germany follows a US plea agreement last year, when VW agreed to pay a criminal fine of $4.3bn to resolve criminal and civil penalties.

Analysis: By Theo Leggett, business correspondent
How serious is this for Volkswagen?

Well, it's a big fine - €1bn is not a small sum. But it pales into insignificance compared with the fines and compensation the group has had to pay out in the US - which add up to well over €20bn

If this puts an end to criminal proceedings in Europe, VW may well think it's a relatively small price to pay. The company has consistently denied that the software fitted to its cars was actually illegal under European law. Nevertheless, it will welcome the disappearance of that particular legal threat.

VW does still face a number of civil lawsuits, brought by disgruntled car owners and shareholders. It's not clear yet what impact VW's admission of "responsibility for the diesel crisis" will have on those proceedings.

But for the moment, it's possible to imagine suits in Wolfsburg breathing a heavy sigh of relief. It could have been worse.

The total cost of the scandal has been much higher. VW has set aside $30bn to pay for its US bill, which includes fixing cars, buying back cars, clean air fines, penalties and compensation.

The Volkswagen scandal erupted in September 2015, when the company admitted that nearly 600,000 cars sold in the US were fitted with "defeat devices" designed to circumvent emissions tests.

Since then it has emerged that VW installed emissions-cheating software in nearly 11 million vehicles worldwide.
https://www.bbc.com/news/business-44474781
 
#3
Mercedes too recently....
Waiting for BMW to get hit as well.
Certainly not good news for the industry in terms of confidence.
It makes a mockery of either the legislation, the testing regime (now formerly NEDC replaced with WTLP) or the ethics of the manufactures...if not all of them.
A VERY poor showing all round.
I love my diesel for torque and economy. I'm not happy about how we've been sold a lie about efficiency, economy and environmental impact..
 

falcon786

Executive Member
#5
Mercedes too recently....
Waiting for BMW to get hit as well.
Certainly not good news for the industry in terms of confidence.
It makes a mockery of either the legislation, the testing regime (now formerly NEDC replaced with WTLP) or the ethics of the manufactures...if not all of them.
A VERY poor showing all round.
I love my diesel for torque and economy. I'm not happy about how we've been sold a lie about efficiency, economy and environmental impact..
+1.
 
#11
How did those software developers put in those tweaks without senior management knowledge? Naughty developers
How did the developers know about the requirement? Some personal time research? :) Somewhere, someone, is burning a sticky note with the words:"As a money hungry business, we want to cheat the system, so that we can generate extra $."
 
#12
Yeah, thats pretty much it. Profit over responsibility.
Cheat the tests to not have to invest in THE BEST and MOST EFFECTIVE and MOST ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY emissions reduction methods possible.
In my mind it smacks of deliberate action and intention to skirt doing the work.
 

Ricard

Expert Member
#13
Just get rid of diesel cars
Diesel is a lie... I have owned 3 diesel cars, all ended catastrophically. (well almost)
Volvo S40 DrivE 1.6d (4.5l/100km )- EGR Failed,DPF failed, and finally Turbo failed and engine ran away with itself and over-revved.
Ford 2.0 TDCI (5.5l/100km) - EGR failed, DPF failed
Hyundai 1.7 Diesel (5.4l/100) - just didnt like car.. its boring.

I now have a little 2.0 petrol Mazda CX-3 Sport with none of that EGR/turbo/junk and I get 6.1l/100km.Its a hoot to drive and cheaper to run and maintain. Unless its a company car, I am staying the hell away from the diesel lie.
 
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LCBXX

Executive Member
#17
Diesel is a lie... I have owned 3 diesel cars, all ended catastrophically. (well almost)
Volvo S40 DrivE 1.6d (4.5l/100km )- EGR Failed,DPF failed, and finally Turbo failed and engine ran away with itself and over-revved.
Ford 2.0 TDCI (5.5l/100km) - EGR failed, DPF failed
Hyundai 1.7 Diesel (5.4l/100) - just didnt like car.. its boring.

I now have a little 2.0 petrol Mazda CX-3 Sport with none of that EGR/turbo/junk and I get 6.1l/100km.Its a hoot to drive and cheaper to run and maintain. Unless its a company car, I am staying the hell away from the diesel lie.
I, on the contrary, love turbodiesels and have had only bliss with the ones I had.
Polo 9N 1.9 96KW - traded it for a diesel Civic with 125,000km. Not one hiccup. The turbo got replaced under a campaign and when I got it back it felt detuned. I suspect they flashed the ECU to a milder profile. Clattery engine and rough but could easily do 1000KM on a 45L tank. It did smoke a lot as well under load.
Civic 2.2 104KW - Smooth and free revving engine that I felt was really under-stressed. It developed clutch slip at around 77,000km that was due to a manufacturing defect. It was going to get fixed by Honda at no cost to me until they found me a facelifted FK Civic and I traded it for that. Diesel mileage was a lot worse than the Polo and I struggled to get better than 5.8L/100km. Hardly, if any, diesel smoke at all.
Civic 2.2 f-lift w/ECU remap 130KW/440NM - This thing went like the clappers without losing any of the engine refinement or diesel mileage. In-gear acceleration outran many a GTi and ST Focus without really trying.

My current 1.5 turbopetrol in the Kuga is very impressive as well, given the size of the car it needs to lug around. I don't think I would consider a diesel again unless a 3L Audi or BMW comes across my path at the right price.
 
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