Do electric fences us a lot of electricity?

Are you worrying about the ability to put the fences supports onto the vibracrete? Just making sure.

eehelolfire is partly correct. Electric fencing is a deterrent but primarily also a perimeter alarm (since the siren should go off when there is a disturbance with the pulse sent through, if siren not attached and working its pretty useless), that can be linked to house alarm thus armed response if required.

One has to have multiple level of security to approach 100% effective since 100% is difficult and VERY costly to reach with one system. 3 different type system of 90% effectiveness would give you 99.9% effectiveness.

So start with the electric fence but you also need to physically secure (security door and bars) the house and/or at least the sleeping zone (remember smoke alarm/s to wake you in time if there is a fire).

Other effective systems are perimeter/outdoor sensors like roboguard or the ones that integrate with the house alarm. Windows and door alarms sensors. Dogs. Lighting. Armed response.
My neighbour has electric fence that borders one side of my property. When I bought my house I notice a tree on my property growing through the fence, was worried until I saw all his trees growing through it as well.

I still want to cut my tree but not sure what do to.
 
My neighbour has electric fence that borders one side of my property. When I bought my house I notice a tree on my property growing through the fence, was worried until I saw all his trees growing through it as well.

I still want to cut my tree but not sure what do to.
Bending a twig or two today, saves a huge risky lumberjack operation tomorrow.
 
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FYI to anyone who may have this issue...

Is your electric fence going haywire, especially when it's triggered?

Did you recently get Solar/Backup?

If so, you probably did what i did and disconnected the battery from the energizer because why waste batteries every year when the system can run off the inverter/solar.

WRONG - it seems the entire thing is built to run off the battery, which is then charged. It doesn't pass-through current in parallel while charging. And the net result is a very unstable fence especially when its triggered in to alarm - the whole thing basically crashes in an alarm state of constant alarm despite any attempts to disarm it.

So yeah, it will always need a battery connected to it and in good working order.
 
Look at the energiser specs, they typically use 30-45W. The number of strands does not affect it.

Our old model was rated at 4J and used to last 4 hours on a 7Ah battery. Our current energiser is rated at 8J and lasts half as long on the same battery. We had to install an inverter, since a 2 hour battery life is not adequate (thanks Eskom).

And yes, it requires both battery power and mains AC to work properly...
 
Look at the energiser specs, they typically use 30-45W. The number of strands does not affect it.

Ahh thank and costing wise? I assume it's roughly R 125 per m for the 6 strands and then 5k for the energizer. Does the spec of the energizer make a big difference?
 
Ahh thank and costing wise? I assume it's roughly R 125 per m for the 6 strands and then 5k for the energizer. Does the spec of the energizer make a big difference?
I am not sure, not up to date on electric fence pricing. Any energiser that can deliver 7-8 joules for your chosen perimeter should be OK. The weak point is usually the earthing rods, they need to be every 30m by law, but I would personally place them every 10m, particularly in SA where we have don't have lots of rain, dry ground makes for a bad conductor. I also know that a 6 strand fence (aka a contractors "compliance" fence) is considered wholly insufficient in 2023, you should be considering 10-14 strand.
 
I am not sure, not up to date on electric fence pricing. Any energiser that can deliver 7-8 joules for your chosen perimeter should be OK. The weak point is usually the earthing rods, they need to be every 30m by law, but I would personally place them every 10m, particularly in SA where we have don't have lots of rain, dry ground makes for a bad conductor. I also know that a 6 strand fence (aka a contractors "compliance" fence) is considered wholly insufficient in 2023, you should be considering 10-14 strand.

Already in a boomed off area but there is construction next door so just looking to stop the oportunistic lad jumping over the wall
 
Already in a boomed off area but there is construction next door so just looking to stop the oportunistic lad jumping over the wall
If you go for 6 strand, you will be upgrading after the first incident, and it's almost as expensive as re-doing the whole fence, vs marginal increase. Don't half-ass it.

ron-swanson-nick-offerman.gif
 
Other option is an alarm for teh same price but external beams are rediculous like 4k a pop
 
Have run our electric fence on the standard 12v backup battery for well over 6hrs by comparison standard 12v battery on our alarm system used to run for about 3hrs.

So no they do not use much.
 
I am not sure, not up to date on electric fence pricing. Any energiser that can deliver 7-8 joules for your chosen perimeter should be OK. The weak point is usually the earthing rods, they need to be every 30m by law, but I would personally place them every 10m, particularly in SA where we have don't have lots of rain, dry ground makes for a bad conductor. I also know that a 6 strand fence (aka a contractors "compliance" fence) is considered wholly insufficient in 2023, you should be considering 10-14 strand.

8 strand minimum.
 
FYI to anyone who may have this issue...

Is your electric fence going haywire, especially when it's triggered?

Did you recently get Solar/Backup?

If so, you probably did what i did and disconnected the battery from the energizer because why waste batteries every year when the system can run off the inverter/solar.

WRONG - it seems the entire thing is built to run off the battery, which is then charged. It doesn't pass-through current in parallel while charging. And the net result is a very unstable fence especially when its triggered in to alarm - the whole thing basically crashes in an alarm state of constant alarm despite any attempts to disarm it.

So yeah, it will always need a battery connected to it and in good working order.
I can confirm this. Those batteries hate load shedding and will keep causing more and more alarms as they lose capacity. Consider replacing with a LiFePo4 battery, as it is better than lead acid in every conceivable way. Unless you like waking up to the sound of your alarm, of course (personal experience).
 
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