Dog Pellets From Woolworths

disabled

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2005
Messages
1,925
Just been on the news that Dog pellets bought from Woolworths have been withdrawn from their shelves as there have been reports of dog deaths:eek: ...

We bought dog pellets from Woolworths but luckily our dogs refused to eat them...Clever dogs:)

I was informed of this and did not hear it myself can anyone else that can confirm this please!
 
Last edited:

JK8

Banned
Joined
Jan 18, 2006
Messages
14,105
Just been on the news that Dog pellets bought from Woolworths have been withdrawn from their shelves as there have been reports of dog deaths:eek: ...

We bought dog pellets from Woolworths but luckily our dogs refused to eat them...Clever dogs:)

I was informed of this and did not hear it myself can anyone else that can confirm this please!
Old news. But its true.
 

Datura

Captain Faptastic
Joined
Oct 12, 2006
Messages
46,331
Yip true. A pet food manufacturer in Maitland CT had an incident where 2 or 3 batches of food were contaminated with cooling agent for industrial machinery and resulted in a number of dogs dying from all sorts of complications. Sad story will look for a link

Edit: Link
 
Last edited:

disabled

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2005
Messages
1,925
Thanks Datura and JK8 for confirming this...Thank goodness for my foxies and Jackrussel they are clever dogs...
 

disabled

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2005
Messages
1,925
This is terrible! :mad:
Yes it is I wonder if there's any recourse for those who lost their dogs...

And I mean Woolworths?

We use to supply Woolworths with Organic Assorted salad lettuces, and if they found a worm or so etc they would condemn our whole consignment of lettuces.:mad: I'm horrified that their quality control never picked this up!:mad:

The Animal food is packed by a company who packs for Woolworths under Woolworths brand name, Now my question is: Does this company pack under other brands that are still on the shelves in other stores??
 
Last edited:

Paul_S

Expert Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2006
Messages
4,674
Yes it is I wonder if there's any recourse for those who lost their dogs...

And I mean Woolworths?

We use to supply Woolworths with Organic Assorted salad lettuces, and if they found a worm or so etc they would condemn our whole consignment of lettuces.:mad: I'm horrified that their quality control never picked this up!:mad:
Well picking up chemical contamination is not easy - you need a laboratory with skilled personnel and time to test every single consignment coming in.
That would be an expensive and time consuming exercise.

The whole "quality" thing of Woolworths is a farce.
They condemn an entire consignment of lettuce salads if they find one worm but they have no way of testing for poisonous residues like pesticides and fungicides.
All they are doing is making sure that there is no "gross" factor.
I'd rather eat a worm or two than be poisoned.
 

blonde one

Expert Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2007
Messages
1,380
Yes it is I wonder if there's any recourse for those who lost their dogs...

And I mean Woolworths?

We use to supply Woolworths with Organic Assorted salad lettuces, and if they found one worm they would condem our whole consignment of lettuces.:mad: I'm horrified that their quality control never picked this up!:mad:
It seems as though Woolworth's quality has taken a dive but when it comes to their products causing pet deaths they have an unacceptable problem.
Just the other day I was considering buying some of their dog food purely out of convenience, thank goodness I didn't! My animals are extremely precious to me and the thought of what could have happened had I bought Woolworth's dog food is too close for comfort.
I will no longer trust any Woolworth's products and I hope more animal lovers take the same stand!:mad: :mad:
 

disabled

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2005
Messages
1,925
Well picking up chemical contamination is not easy - you need a laboratory with skilled personnel and time to test every single consignment coming in.
That would be an expensive and time consuming exercise.

The whole "quality" thing of Woolworths is a farce.
They condemn an entire consignment of lettuce salads if they find one worm but they have no way of testing for poisonous residues like pesticides and fungicides.
All they are doing is making sure that there is no "gross" factor.
I'd rather eat a worm or two than be poisoned.
Well said, Thanks for the explano, We have lost thousands of rands because of this (worms etc) and we don't supply to them anymore and I never want to either...We are certified Organic and don't use poisons...:mad: so what do you expect?
 

Datura

Captain Faptastic
Joined
Oct 12, 2006
Messages
46,331
Toxicity
The major danger from ethylene glycol is following ingestion. Due to its sweet taste, children and animals will sometimes consume large quantities of it if given access to antifreeze. Ethylene glycol may also be found as a contaminant in unlawfully distilled whiskey (moonshine) made in a still constructed using an improperly washed car radiator. In developed countries, a bittering agent called denatonium/ denatonium benzoate, is generally added to ethylene glycol preparations as an adversant (to prevent accidental ingestion).

Ethylene glycol poisoning is a medical emergency and in all cases a poison control center should be contacted or medical attention should be sought. It is highly toxic with an estimated lethal dose of 100% ethylene glycol in humans of approximately 1.4 ml/kg.[1] However, as little as 30 milliliters (2 tablespoons) can be lethal to adults.[2]


[edit] Symptoms
Symptoms of ethylene glycol poisoning usually follow a three-step progression, although poisoned individuals will not always develop each stage or follow a specific time frame.[1] Stage 1 consists of neurological symptoms including victims appearing to be intoxicated, exhibiting symptoms such as dizziness, slurred speech, and confusion. Over time, the body metabolizes ethylene glycol into other toxins, it is first metabolized to glycoaldehyde, which is then oxidized to glycolic acid, glyoxylic acid, and finally oxalic acid. Stage 2 is a result of accumulation of these metabolites and consists of tachycardia, hypertension, hyperventilation, and metabolic acidosis. Stage 3 of ethylene glycol poisoning is the result of kidney injury, leading to acute kidney failure.[3] Oxalic acid reacts with calcium and forms calcium oxalate crystals in the kidney.
ethylene-glycol

Kidney failure is awful. Must have been really hard for the owners to watch their beloved pets die like that!!!!!!
 

VernD

Executive Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2006
Messages
5,265
Well picking up chemical contamination is not easy - you need a laboratory with skilled personnel and time to test every single consignment coming in.
That would be an expensive and time consuming exercise.

The whole "quality" thing of Woolworths is a farce.
They condemn an entire consignment of lettuce salads if they find one worm but they have no way of testing for poisonous residues like pesticides and fungicides.
All they are doing is making sure that there is no "gross" factor.
I'd rather eat a worm or two than be poisoned.
I happen to have worked very closely with the Woolworths food technology department; they test their products on a 3-month cycle, just to check the integrity of the product. So, yes, they wouldn't have picked up that problem because they don't test every consignment. They rely very much on feedback from their customers - not that I'm saying that a few dogs has to die first before they detect the problem.

As for the fresh produce side, every consignment is inspected visually by the fresh produce food technologists. Production is not an issue because you, as the supplier, would have already been audited before they accepted you as a supplier. You would have also signed an acceptance agreement, part of which states that you will produce the product within their specifications. So, if their was worms/ a worm in your product, you are basically in breach of that agreement, which gives them the right to cancel your consignment. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news.
 

PostmanPot

Honorary Master
Joined
Jul 16, 2005
Messages
34,944
It seems as though Woolworth's quality has taken a dive but when it comes to their products causing pet deaths they have an unacceptable problem.
Just the other day I was considering buying some of their dog food purely out of convenience, thank goodness I didn't! My animals are extremely precious to me and the thought of what could have happened had I bought Woolworth's dog food is too close for comfort.
I will no longer trust any Woolworth's products and I hope more animal lovers take the same stand!:mad: :mad:
You're definately blowing this out of proportion. How was Woolworths meant to know that the food was contaminated? Most of the stuff they sell, especially the dog food, is not produced or manufactured by them. It's rebranded. I'm sure you know this?

Woolworths probably removed the dog food purely because people were less inclined to buy it after the accident (which wasn't Woolworths' fault as explained above). As stated earlier, this happened a while ago, and obviously once alerted about dog deaths they would remove all stock of the contaminated batch and replace it with fresh, probably tested stock.

My point is that there is no need to "thank goodness" because there would have been no risk in buying the food.
 

Boodles

Executive Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2005
Messages
5,294
Well said, Thanks for the explano, We have lost thousands of rands because of this (worms etc) and we don't supply to them anymore and I never want to either...We are certified Organic and don't use poisons...:mad: so what do you expect?
what type of lettuces' are you growing? What else you doing?
 

disabled

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2005
Messages
1,925
I happen to have worked very closely with the Woolworths food technology department; they test their products on a 3-month cycle, just to check the integrity of the product. So, yes, they wouldn't have picked up that problem because they don't test every consignment. They rely very much on feedback from their customers - not that I'm saying that a few dogs has to die first before they detect the problem.

As for the fresh produce side, every consignment is inspected visually by the fresh produce food technologists. Production is not an issue because you, as the supplier, would have already been audited before they accepted you as a supplier. You would have also signed an acceptance agreement, part of which states that you will produce the product within their specifications. So, if their was worms/ a worm in your product, you are basically in breach of that agreement, which gives them the right to cancel your consignment. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news.
There was no such agreement made that we had to sign, the spec sheets came long after we started supplying them, our product never went direct to Woolworths it went via a company who did the processing I think they might be associated to Woolworths not sure

Anyway the fact of the matter is we don't supply them anymore and it was our decision not theirs to stop as we where losing money.

All our other produce goes to various large supermarkets up north and export and we have had no problems, but of course we don't grow lettuces for no one anymore
 
Last edited:

blonde one

Expert Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2007
Messages
1,380
They rely very much on feedback from their customers - not that I'm saying that a few dogs has to die first before they detect the problem..
But unfortunately that's what happened - Woolworths should be banned from producing such foodstuffs until they can guarantee a quality control method that is foolproof.
 

Pitbull

Verboten
Joined
Apr 8, 2006
Messages
63,306
How to test quality of dog pellets.

Hi Guys.

I buy my Pellets in bulk.

I have learned a little thing over the years and here is my advice.

When you buy pellets try the following even with your current prefered brand.
Chuck a hand full in a bowl of water. Let them be in there for about 2 hours.

If they become puffy and still float don't ever buy that brand again.

Reason. Some Pellet makers add cardboard to the pellets not allot but enough to give the pellets volume. These float when wet. If it desolves and lays on the bottom you have the best quality money can buy.

Use it don't use it.
 

Boodles

Executive Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2005
Messages
5,294
Worms will forever be in lettuces'. It no big deal, just toss the worm away.

Does lettuce packaging have a warning about worms?
 

disabled

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2005
Messages
1,925
what type of lettuces' are you growing? What else you doing?
We don't grow lettuces any more...We grow C/Tomatoes...Beans, Broccoli,B/cabbages,carrots etc most types of root vegetables etc,g/peppers,egg plant etc Chillies,spinach,danyaetc
 
Last edited:
Top