Don’t call us ‘coloured’, Ehrenreich tells Ramaphosa

Nick333

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Your family is a bit closer than an entire race group, no? There may be stuff you could be proud of by virtue of association with them. I for example would not feel proud if I were wealthy because of an inheritance.
But, you could feel proud of the relative whose achievements acquired said wealth surely?
 

marvymarv007

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Tony Ehrenreich seems to be a "play-white", hence the need to desperately be called Camisa. Screams insecurity.

Bigger things wrong in the political arena, than a non-derogatory word, that Mr Tony "Camisa" Ehrenreich should use his resources to stand up for and fight against.
 

Fulcrum29

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Wait, the Camisa River was historically named by the Khoikhoi. Now we know the Khoikhoi wants to be acknowledged as THE indigenous peoples of South Africa, but Tony Ehrenreich is now digging into their identity. Would Tony Ehrenreich confirm his identity as Khoikhoi?
 

Sweevo

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boer is offensive to afrikaners. coloured is offensive to coloureds. What next - Is being called Indian offensive to Indians as well?
Don’t confuse offensive with the intent to offend. I.e the term boer is used by some in an offensive manner but it probably doesn’t offend as intended.
 

porchrat

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Your family is a bit closer than an entire race group, no? There may be stuff you could be proud of by virtue of association with them. I for example would not feel proud if I were wealthy because of an inheritance.
As far as I can see the principle remains the same whether we're talking about a racial group or your family.

I mean at which point does it become too far away for you to no longer be allowed to feel that pride? ... a nation? (my family roots are from Scotland),... the modern country that that nation ended up a part of? (Britain)?... the ethnic group within a racial group?... the entire racial group?

It's all the same. They're all your ancestors and you can feel pride for being part of continuing the story of each of those levels.
 

daveza

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https://ewn.co.za/2018/09/20/tony-e...r-to-ramaphosa-on-heritage-of-coloured-people

CAPE TOWN - Former Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu) Western Cape secretary Tony Ehrenreich has written a letter to President Cyril Ramaphosa on the 'heritage of coloured people'.

Ehrenreich was recently found guilty of hate speech by the South African Human Rights Commission.

In his letter, Ehrenreich says he views the term 'coloured' as a derogatory construct of apartheid and the racial separation of people.

“I’ve written a letter to the president to raise the question about the de-Africanisation of coloured people. Coloured people are as much Africans as our brothers from Xhosa or Zulu tribe. So coloured people should also be seen as Africans.”

Ehrenreich has also slammed what he views as the de-Africanisation of coloured people in South Africa.

“This is an important question because it brings our people closer together.”
Hello Tony - they already are seen as Africans.

Fact that they come from mixed heritage doesn't seem to matter.
 

daveza

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Haven't kept up with the race laws for decades.

If a white/black couple have a child, which race is the child designated ?
 

JustAsk

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I don't know a single coloured person who has any problem calling themselves coloured.
Maybe its because you only know coloured people. There's plenty of brown people that know their Khoe and/or San identity.
And no, i do not talk about the 12 half clothed guys you always see on tv. "Khoisan" people did the same that black and white people did back then, cloth themselves.
The term means "to hide, conceal,cover, a political term the oppressors use to hide the first land dwellers, and with that their lawful birthright.

You can call me "boer" all day - I don't mind. The "boers" have a rich and vibrant history with many notable achievements.
Boer is Dutch for farmer, which is where the afrikaans equivalent comes from. Two of my uncles are boere too. It does not mean white and it is surely not a name for some ethnic group. Sure some people with a lack of identity call them that, just like many equilly identityless "brown people" prefer the term coloured out of convenience.

Speak for yourself. I'm proud of being white, even more so being an Afrikaans White :p
Nobody is born white, black or a South African. It's silly to be proud of such fictional things. It's only after your birth registration is done that you now have the white/black/coloured classification on your SA person.
 
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