Don’t study university degrees which will leave you unemployed

krycor

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I dunno yet, how many ministers have non profession degrees if anything? Seems like it's worked to me
 

porchrat

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A friend of mine studied a Humanities degree. Now earns probably double what I do in IT. Not saying this is the norm but it can happen.
 

konfab

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The humanities do have a place in academia, however they are more of a bonus to society than a necessity. Which is why I would be discriminatory with the higher education budget. Have a fine arts dept for sure but it should be privately funded for the rich trust fund kiddies whose parents light their weed with R200 notes. Then allocate the rest of the budget to degrees with marketable skills.
 

Knyro

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Discouraging people from doing pure sciences would be an incredibly stupid idea. It is very short-sighted.

:rolleyes:

I don't wan't to purge them, thank goodness for the arts, they help make our existence more enjoyable and move culture along. However students should not be blind to the potential negative consequences of their degree choices.

^

There is a difference between discouraging someone and giving them the complete picture. Telling them everything will be sunshine and daisies no matter what they do is dishonest and unfair. They can decide for themselves whether the risks are worth taking.
 

Mila

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I don't wan't to purge them, thank goodness for the arts, they help make our existence more enjoyable and move culture along. However students should not be blind to the potential negative consequences of their degree choices.

You are rather odd. I studied a so called humanities degree, and I cannot stand art. And I work in a highly specialised and technical field.

The thing is people like Pinball is a limited number from that group. Yes we need some people that have this skill but not as many. It should be a smaller number. There are people Like Pinball that will make a roaring success out of it. But more that doesn't. If we had as many people doing engineering we would have had as many people that fell out.

It is also when parents make kids go study something when they do not really know what they will do with it in the end.

People should study for more specific fields not something called BSC Marketing.
Running a business is something I wish my courses included but it was excluded because I'm one of those arty farty people that studied art and have no natural business sense. Nothing. And parents that has none either. But I do not think one need a degree in it.

but then again I was in 8 schools, my parents weren't that interested and I had no guidance as to what to go study.

MAybe it just all go down to proper career guidance.
 

cerebus

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This article makes some very strong points:

Artisanal trades are actually not the greatest in-demand areas of employment. It's much more the unglamorous, technical professions like air traffic control, agriculture, geriatric medicine and so on that are losing their workforce due to an aging population.
 

Mila

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I don't wan't to purge them, thank goodness for the arts, they help make our existence more enjoyable and move culture along. However students should not be blind to the potential negative consequences of their degree choices.

The humanities do have a place in academia, however they are more of a bonus to society than a necessity. Which is why I would be discriminatory with the higher education budget. Have a fine arts dept for sure but it should be privately funded for the rich trust fund kiddies whose parents light their weed with R200 notes. Then allocate the rest of the budget to degrees with marketable skills.

NOOOO!!! Not only the rich are artists!! :mad: :eek:
Studying art shouldn't be that expensive. but it should be business driven.
How to make a business from art. So when you finally finished you can at least get decent paying admin or business management job (when you realize that you are no Picasso. )

PEople have this idea that a fine arts student is going to paint pictures. There are nice jobs out there for that kind of degree but not a large number. And kids and parents should be told this and made aware of it. You should be put in contact with all kinds of people that studied art. The head designer at Marie Claire and the professional waiter that just couldn't cut it.

We shouldn't dash kid's dreams but we should serve them with a healthy dose of realism from a very young age. Especially the dreamers and the artists.
 

Nicodeamus

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Yeah, and sarcasm is lost on you. Nevermind. Let's agree to disagree.

Edit: I mean it's a pointless debate. You wont convince me that kids should be pushed to study what "pays better" than what they love to do. I'm a fan of find out what you love to do, and make that pay you.

Lets be honest, how many 18 Year olds know what they want to do in life? If my kids study something like lady gaga studies then I feel obliged to tell them no I wont pay for it.
 

einad5

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It takes all kinds to create a well balanced society, thus I would never want to discourage a student from following his/her passion. What I would suggest is that the qualifications that are in higher demand be subsidised so that we van get more people with that qualification in the workforce.
 

^^vampire^^

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It takes all kinds to create a well balanced society, thus I would never want to discourage a student from following his/her passion. What I would suggest is that the qualifications that are in higher demand be subsidised so that we van get more people with that qualification in the workforce.

It never hurts to encourage those to get a degree etc etc but there a few flaws in many peoples logic. There is such a huge gap in knowledge transfer in this country that most students that get into varsity are basically borderline retarded - a snail could get university entrance. The problem then comes in that those that get university entrance only qualify to study nonsense degrees because they don't qualify for any real qualification streams and so they just do one of the handful of choices that they qualify for. Now you have students that might qualify for any course they want but take one of the "easier" courses because they have a passion for it. Now you John Doe's that just did the qualification because that's all they could get into must compete against someone that is knowledgeable and passionate about the subject. Don't know about you but if I was hiring I know who I would hire and it wouldn't be the borderliners that just did a certain qualification just so they have one.

The biggest problem is everyone gets told you can't get a job without a qualification, and to a certain extent that is true, but getting a qualification for getting a qualifications sake doesn't make you employable in the least. Kids don't seem to grasp that you get employed because the employer can establish that you love the work content and that you are willing to push yourself further to learn and grow and be better at what you do. Most people in this country think "Yay! I've got a qualification now give me a job and pay me!". They don't realise the qualification is the easiest part. I always say that if you stop learning and your passion dies for your job then you are dead in the water and very quickly become obsolete, dead weight to an employer and they quickly start trying to get rid of you. Most newly qualified graduates immediately fall into this category with a complete lack of pride or work ethic coupled with an entitlement attitude.

The only bonus is they make it dead easy for anyone willing to put in the smallest amount of effort to get a job.
 

noxibox

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By the logic of encouraging them to choose what will earn them the most money you won't get more engineers either. If they spend time investigating and talking to engineers in the field they'll quickly learn that in general engineers are undervalued, don't earn as much as they should and that most of the work you'll do is going to be tedious.

you get employed because the employer can establish that you love the work content and that you are willing to push yourself further to learn and grow and be better at what you do. Most people in this country think "Yay! I've got a qualification now give me a job and pay me!". They don't realise the qualification is the easiest part. I always say that if you stop learning and your passion dies for your job then you are dead in the water and very quickly become obsolete, dead weight to an employer and they quickly start trying to get rid of you. Most newly qualified graduates immediately fall into this category with a complete lack of pride or work ethic coupled with an entitlement attitude.

The only bonus is they make it dead easy for anyone willing to put in the smallest amount of effort to get a job.
Your last sentence effectively contradicts the bulk of your previous paragraph. Truth is most employers don't care whether you have a passion for your job as long as you do it. Plenty of people choose a field based on what they can earn, how easily they can get a job or both, and they either know in advance or quickly discover they hate it, but they'll do that job right through to retirement and make good money doing so.
 

C4Cat

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Society remembers the artists and musicians from history, the poets and philosophers. Not the accountants and engineers, not the programmers and actuaries. Of scientists we only remember the truly creative ones, those that thought out of the box or were entertainers. Just saying.
 

^^vampire^^

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By the logic of encouraging them to choose what will earn them the most money you won't get more engineers either. If they spend time investigating and talking to engineers in the field they'll quickly learn that in general engineers are undervalued, don't earn as much as they should and that most of the work you'll do is going to be tedious.


Your last sentence effectively contradicts the bulk of your previous paragraph. Truth is most employers don't care whether you have a passion for your job as long as you do it. Plenty of people choose a field based on what they can earn, how easily they can get a job or both, and they either know in advance or quickly discover they hate it, but they'll do that job right through to retirement and make good money doing so.

No it doesn't. I find it easy to find employment as a software developer as I have a passion for what I do and I'm good at it. There are tons of software developers out there that can't get a job because they are in it for the money, not for what it is, and because of this they don't keep their skills relevant or make sure they can do the job effectively.

My point has gone straight over your head. Obviously you'll get both extremes and everything in between but for the most part people that barely scrape through matric just get a degree for getting a degrees sake. Yes some people will hate their job but do it efficiently and great for them if they want to be happy. My comments are based on the fact that a large portion of the population don't get relevant degrees because they can't because they don't work hard to get to do a good course that is worthwhile and end up in ****ty jobs where they don't apply themselves and hence a huge cycle of absolute ineptitude.

Yes some places just hire whoever. Shame for them honestly. I'd pay the extra bucks to get someone who can do the job. By employing just anyone you're showing that you shouldn't be running the business in the first place.

Need an example. Phone the Telkom call centre, phone MTN, Vodacom or any other. Go down to your local home affairs. These people are where they are because they can't do anything else and hate being there so they do their job badly, if at all.
 

pinball wizard

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Let's at least all agree on the difference between a Fine Arts degree and the general humanities field...
 

cupcake

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Let's at least all agree on the difference between a Fine Arts degree and the general humanities field...

I studied Fine Arts and have absolutely no regrets its not the easy route as many people think. It takes imence dedication and hours of dedicated and detailed work. I now own a successful small business, but i have always been a entrepreneur. I dont think you can safely generalize, success and fulfilment is not soley determined by what you study alone but is rather a combination of preparation and opportunity.
 

HDS

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I studied Fine Arts and have absolutely no regrets its not the easy route as many people think. It takes imence dedication and hours of dedicated and detailed work. I now own a successful small business, but i have always been a entrepreneur. I dont think you can safely generalize, success and fulfilment is not soley determined by what you study alone but is rather a combination of preparation and opportunity.

How much of your success can you contribute to your degree?
 
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