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Drug-resistant superbug spreading in hospitals

OrbitalDawn

Ulysses Everett McGill
Joined
Aug 26, 2011
Messages
39,661
#1
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-09-drug-resistant-superbug-hospitals.html

A superbug resistant to all known antibiotics that can cause "severe" infections or even death is spreading undetected through hospital wards across the world, scientists in Australia warned on Monday.

Researchers at the University of Melbourne discovered three variants of the multidrug-resistant bug in samples from 10 countries, including strains in Europe that cannot be reliably tamed by any drug currently on the market.

"We started with samples in Australia but did a global snapshot and found that it's in many countries and many institutions around the world," Ben Howden, director of the university's Microbiological Diagnostic Unit Public Health Laboratory told AFP.

"It seems to have spread."

The bacteria, known as Staphylococcus epidermidis, is related to the better-known and more deadly MRSA.

It's found naturally on human skin and most commonly infects the elderly or patients who have had prosthetic materials implanted, such as catheters and joint replacements.

"It can be deadly, but it's usually in patients who already are very sick in hospital... it can be quite hard to eradicate and the infections can be severe," Howden said.

His team looked at hundreds of S. epidermidis specimens from 78 hospitals worldwide.

They found that some strains of the bug made a small change in its DNA that led to resistance to two of the most common antibiotics, often administered in tandem to treat hospital infections.
 

MirageF1

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2018
Messages
703
#2
Been around UK hospitals for a decade...was a big thing in early 2010s....shocking really..admitted to hospital for illness or surgery and contract a deadly/sometimes fatal virus instead.
 

Sinbad

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 5, 2006
Messages
60,703
#3
Been around UK hospitals for a decade...was a big thing in early 2010s....shocking really..admitted to hospital for illness or surgery and contract a deadly/sometimes fatal virus instead.
You're talking about MRSA. This is worse.
 

OrbitalDawn

Ulysses Everett McGill
Joined
Aug 26, 2011
Messages
39,661
#7
According to the article MRSA is worse.
"The bacteria, known as Staphylococcus epidermidis, is related to the better-known and more deadly MRSA."
MRSA itself could be more deadly, but the risk posed by this bacteria could be more dangerous overall because of its prevalence.
 

Techne

Executive Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2008
Messages
9,346
#8
resistant to all known antibiotics
...on the market. There are plenty of new agents in the pipeline waiting to be approved and drug design methods are getting better and better.
 

KT-B

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 3, 2014
Messages
10,766
#9
Perhaps there should be a reduction in prescriptions of antibiotics for a few years? Only given to the most severe cases.
I wonder if the resistance can be unlearned?
 

konfab

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 23, 2008
Messages
16,802
#10
Perhaps there should be a reduction in prescriptions of antibiotics for a few years? Only given to the most severe cases.
I wonder if the resistance can be unlearned?
The problem more due to the fact that people do not take the doses as they are required to, and thus create an environment where only the strongest survive.

With cases of severe TB, they require a nurse or a social worker to administer the medicine to the patient so that they actually take it. If these superbugs start becoming a real problem, this will most likely have to start occurring with antibiotics.
 

rietrot

Executive Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2016
Messages
9,194
#16

Scooby_Doo

Executive Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2005
Messages
5,858
#17
Yes and? It should still be realistic, with some artistic licence for stuff to happen that's extremely unlikely. Who ever did that didn't pass biology in schoolor haven't even seen an episode of fear factor to realise that a eyeball is a solid thing and the worm will go around it on it's way out.
Maybe its a super alien bug that likes eyeball juice. lol. Your comment is very out of place in this thread.
 

KT-B

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 3, 2014
Messages
10,766
#18
The problem more due to the fact that people do not take the doses as they are required to, and thus create an environment where only the strongest survive.

With cases of severe TB, they require a nurse or a social worker to administer the medicine to the patient so that they actually take it. If these superbugs start becoming a real problem, this will most likely have to start occurring with antibiotics.
I know. And the irony is that TB can be prevented from spreading with the help of ultraviolet light. But because people didn't believe it and many patients don't complete their treatment - it became stronger. My mother worked in the nursery school on a mine. TB was a huge problem. She had an ultraviolet light that they used when the little ones would begin to show symptoms.

Ultraviolet lights could reduce the spread of tuberculosis in hospital wards and waiting rooms by 70%, according to a new study, published in PLoS Medicine today. The study, which explored the transmission of tuberculosis (TB) from infected patients to guinea pigs, suggests that installing simple ultraviolet C (UVC) lights in hospitals could help reduce the transmission of TB, including drug- resistant strains.
 
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