Easiest way to move abroad as a young south african

binaryman007

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Nov 3, 2019
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13
I am 25 years old with 2 years of work experience in software development and have a degree behind my name. I unfortunately don't have a ton of savings but want to move abroad. What are some routes to decent countries that could work within the next 1-2 years? Or how can I get a job offer without a work visa as from what I have read this is quite a challenging thing to do (visa needs job offer and job offer "wants" a work visa already).


EDIT- Hey everyone. I just wanted to say that I finally managed to secure a job to in the Netherlands. So it looks like I will be going this route. I just want to say thank you to all the insights and replies in this post!
 
Last edited:

Johnatan56

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Aug 23, 2013
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As in have a degree or not? If not, it will make it a lot more difficult as most countries use a point system, and the piece of paper helps. (EDIT: missed that point reading, you do have ignore.)
Most countries are fine for anyone <35yo before they start deducting minor points, by minor I mean like 2/75 based on the Austrian system for every 5 years.

If you have a degree, life will be a lot easier as you get points for that, if hons already done, look at masters maybe, basically you want to be able to stand out so a company can argue to give you a working visa, or enough points to qualify for immigration criteria.

Easiest is ancestry if you have/can, personally have that and just packed bags, left, and now living and working here.

Then language is also important, if non-English (and I think even e.g. Aus/NZ do English cert requirements, can't remember, was on the forum in other threads), do courses in that and usually that's added as points, e.g. German has the Sprachdiplom. You should always endeavor to learn the language of where you want to go.

All you can really do is keep applying to places and hope to get picked, as a software dev what some did was freelance for companies in the country they wanted to work in, and once relationship was good enough/found the right company, ask for a sponsorship (know two friends who did that), others applied to large international companies and did transfer, but that's usually a waiting list and you're going to be working for a few years to get there, and immigration interest over the last few years went up a lot, lots trying to leave, so it's getting more difficult there. These are all like 3-10 year routes though.

So end effect: pick a couple of countries, check their entry requirements and what it is that is pro and con for that country, do remember to rate the culture and the stability quite high as well, e.g. eastern Europe is generally poorer than South Africa, so salary will not be that great, pro is that everyone is poor and theft is still generally low and pricing will be fine, with another con of language is quite difficult to learn for a lot of those countries. Then think 5-10 years in the future, why are young people leaving those regions, etc., research the culture and see if it suits you. Then work your way to it using point system, and then also remember companies can help apply work visa for you based on need, so being specialist for a company helps out.

In terms of funds, save up if you can, you will need a large deposit for rent in a lot of places when you arrive, and in case need to job hunt, you don't have to jump at the first job, it's a job you'll be stuck at for a few years.
 

cguy

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Joined
Jan 2, 2013
Messages
7,912
I am 25 years old with 2 years of work experience in software development and have a degree behind my name. I unfortunately don't have a ton of savings but want to move abroad. What are some routes to decent countries that could work within the next 1-2 years?
I would say a work visa. I got an H1B and went to the USA. They also paid for everything (flights, shipping, corporate housing, car rental, international accountants, visa costs, misc stipend, etc.).
Or how can I get a job offer without a work visa as from what I have read this is quite a challenging thing to do (visa needs job offer and job offer "wants" a work visa already).
Work visas typically need a job offer, so for the most part very few have work visas already.
 

binaryman007

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Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Messages
13
As in have a degree or not? If not, it will make it a lot more difficult as most countries use a point system, and the piece of paper helps. (EDIT: missed that point reading, you do have ignore.)
Most countries are fine for anyone <35yo before they start deducting minor points, by minor I mean like 2/75 based on the Austrian system for every 5 years.

If you have a degree, life will be a lot easier as you get points for that, if hons already done, look at masters maybe, basically you want to be able to stand out so a company can argue to give you a working visa, or enough points to qualify for immigration criteria.

Easiest is ancestry if you have/can, personally have that and just packed bags, left, and now living and working here.

Then language is also important, if non-English (and I think even e.g. Aus/NZ do English cert requirements, can't remember, was on the forum in other threads), do courses in that and usually that's added as points, e.g. German has the Sprachdiplom. You should always endeavor to learn the language of where you want to go.

All you can really do is keep applying to places and hope to get picked, as a software dev what some did was freelance for companies in the country they wanted to work in, and once relationship was good enough/found the right company, ask for a sponsorship (know two friends who did that), others applied to large international companies and did transfer, but that's usually a waiting list and you're going to be working for a few years to get there, and immigration interest over the last few years went up a lot, lots trying to leave, so it's getting more difficult there. These are all like 3-10 year routes though.

So end effect: pick a couple of countries, check their entry requirements and what it is that is pro and con for that country, do remember to rate the culture and the stability quite high as well, e.g. eastern Europe is generally poorer than South Africa, so salary will not be that great, pro is that everyone is poor and theft is still generally low and pricing will be fine, with another con of language is quite difficult to learn for a lot of those countries. Then think 5-10 years in the future, why are young people leaving those regions, etc., research the culture and see if it suits you. Then work your way to it using point system, and then also remember companies can help apply work visa for you based on need, so being specialist for a company helps out.

In terms of funds, save up if you can, you will need a large deposit for rent in a lot of places when you arrive, and in case need to job hunt, you don't have to jump at the first job, it's a job you'll be stuck at for a few years.
Thanks for the insight. I have a bachelors degree and should be finishing up my masters degree next year as well. I guess once thats done I will put more effort into applying for jobs!
 

Stefanmuller

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Mar 12, 2008
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For Canadian Permanent Residency visa, google 'CIC express entry calculator". Put in your real data as of now and then see how many points you get and see how much difference a masters degree or more work experience make by playing around with your numbers. Then go look at what the latest draws cut off (points) were for the last few draws.

I would say that 5 years work experience would be ideal, and to make the move before you turn 30. After 30 you start losing points.

Between NZ, Aus and Can, Canada is the easiest and cheapest to get into if you dont take your specific career into account. All work similar though, you get points for Language proficiency, education, years of work experience and age. You will need proof of each, ie a language test, verification of qualofications, letters from employers etc. The way you verify this may differ.
 

Corelli

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Jun 20, 2008
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I am 25 years old with 2 years of work experience in software development and have a degree behind my name. I unfortunately don't have a ton of savings but want to move abroad. What are some routes to decent countries that could work within the next 1-2 years? Or how can I get a job offer without a work visa as from what I have read this is quite a challenging thing to do (visa needs job offer and job offer "wants" a work visa already).
Australia is about R25k visa, but you get permanent residency. Which degree do you have? If a BSC perfect. You have to study a bit for an english test. Do an IELTS, then apply on skillselect and get your qualification approved by them (About R4000 for English test, and same for qualification confirmation). It can take a year or so. But if you do get it, which you should easily. You will get permanent residency from the go, and then just move there and find a job (not tricky as unemployment extremely low).

Canada has same English test but no really a qualification checking. You can do an express entry (fees are cheaper than Aus) or can even take a rural pilot. Very easy.

If however you are single and would like to live in the best country (which is a small city in the world) Then Singapore would be best. Generally its Utopia, but can get hot. If you are a family moving there, it can be expensive. But if single a piece of cake. You will have to apply via some agency and have to probably travel there for interview. Initially its expensive, but you get PR in as short as 2 years, and then citizenship in another 2 years. Once you get that, its relatively cheap. The government pretty much fund you for an HDB flat, medical is cheap and if you then get married and have kids...schoolfees are $5 yip at some of the best schools in the world. Then you will have well pretty much the no1 passport that can go anywhere in the world. Its really great and many a friend are happy there.

I wouldnt bother with the USA honestly. TV version US is much better than reality version (although Breaking Bad is pretty accurate and so is Ozark).

Id goto Aus. Brisbane, Singapore or well Toronto, CA rather.

For US its either Seattle or ideally North Carolina.
 

Corelli

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I would not goto Europe. All the good Europeans have left. Most are in SA.

Ie the people that made the megabucks for Europe. Original Dutch East Indies company. Split between SA, Argentina, Indonesia, Singapore, Japan, Malaysia and the US of A.
 

JuliusSeizure

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The path is different for everyone and there is no set answer. Some benefit due to being highly skilled, others have dual citizenship through ancestry and some just have connections in the right places (they obviously hardly disclose this).

If you just want to experience living in another country for an extended period of time, your best bet is just to take an English teaching job in South East Asia. If you have a degree, you will definitely get a job through that route.
 

Chun_li

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I'm in a similar situation but I'm still studying for my degree. I'm looking at going into the field of marketing/communications career wise and honestly, it's a field that is seeing increased demand everywhere BESIDES SA by the looks of it, not to mention you have certain economic policies locally which can make it difficult to get a job because of your race.

As for countries you should look at moving to, I think it really depends on why you're wanting to emigrate. If you don't have the money to emigrate to a developed country, consider going to South America or Asia. Not many people think of emigrating to these areas so you shouldn't have too much competition from other foreigners vying for the same position. To me it makes sense going to a country such as Malaysia or Brazil, travel, explore life while you're young and build your career and once you feel like you have gained enough experience and saved enough money, then consider emigrating to a more developed nation.

Both Canada, Australia and the UK have good job opportunities but I would assume they would be very expensive to emigrate to, especially if you have to pay for everything out of your own pocket. If you work in Asia or Latin America, it could work in your favour when applying for a job in other countries because you would have a diverse range of work experience.
 

cguy

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I'm in a similar situation but I'm still studying for my degree. I'm looking at going into the field of marketing/communications career wise and honestly, it's a field that is seeing increased demand everywhere BESIDES SA by the looks of it, not to mention you have certain economic policies locally which can make it difficult to get a job because of your race.

As for countries you should look at moving to, I think it really depends on why you're wanting to emigrate. If you don't have the money to emigrate to a developed country, consider going to South America or Asia. Not many people think of emigrating to these areas so you shouldn't have too much competition from other foreigners vying for the same position. To me it makes sense going to a country such as Malaysia or Brazil, travel, explore life while you're young and build your career and once you feel like you have gained enough experience and saved enough money, then consider emigrating to a more developed nation.

Both Canada, Australia and the UK have good job opportunities but I would assume they would be very expensive to emigrate to, especially if you have to pay for everything out of your own pocket. If you work in Asia or Latin America, it could work in your favour when applying for a job in other countries because you would have a diverse range of work experience.
I thought you were going to suggest, turning yourself upside down and helicoptering it with your legs into a foreign country.


 

Hamster

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I am 25 years old with 2 years of work experience in software development and have a degree behind my name.
1. Subscribe to LinkedIn Premium
2. Set your profile as looking for work in the Netherlands (or whatever, the dutch are hiring though)
3. Wait...

That's the easiest way. Spamming companies with your cv will speed up the process.
 

roadcat

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Mar 23, 2006
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2,577
I wouldnt bother with the USA honestly. TV version US is much better than reality version (although Breaking Bad is pretty accurate and so is Ozark).

For US its either Seattle or ideally North Carolina.
Its pretty awesome actually (except for the food)

North Carolina :love:
 

binaryman007

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Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Messages
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1. Subscribe to LinkedIn Premium
2. Set your profile as looking for work in the Netherlands (or whatever, the dutch are hiring though)
3. Wait...

That's the easiest way. Spamming companies with your cv will speed up the process.
Will linkedin premium really give that many more job offers?
 

binaryman007

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Messages
13
The path is different for everyone and there is no set answer. Some benefit due to being highly skilled, others have dual citizenship through ancestry and some just have connections in the right places (they obviously hardly disclose this).

If you just want to experience living in another country for an extended period of time, your best bet is just to take an English teaching job in South East Asia. If you have a degree, you will definitely get a job through that route.
I might do something like this as a plan B. If after 2 years from now I feel like I havent gotten anywhere I will sell all my stuff and do that.
 

binaryman007

Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Messages
13
Australia is about R25k visa, but you get permanent residency. Which degree do you have? If a BSC perfect. You have to study a bit for an english test. Do an IELTS, then apply on skillselect and get your qualification approved by them (About R4000 for English test, and same for qualification confirmation). It can take a year or so. But if you do get it, which you should easily. You will get permanent residency from the go, and then just move there and find a job (not tricky as unemployment extremely low).

Canada has same English test but no really a qualification checking. You can do an express entry (fees are cheaper than Aus) or can even take a rural pilot. Very easy.

If however you are single and would like to live in the best country (which is a small city in the world) Then Singapore would be best. Generally its Utopia, but can get hot. If you are a family moving there, it can be expensive. But if single a piece of cake. You will have to apply via some agency and have to probably travel there for interview. Initially its expensive, but you get PR in as short as 2 years, and then citizenship in another 2 years. Once you get that, its relatively cheap. The government pretty much fund you for an HDB flat, medical is cheap and if you then get married and have kids...schoolfees are $5 yip at some of the best schools in the world. Then you will have well pretty much the no1 passport that can go anywhere in the world. Its really great and many a friend are happy there.

I wouldnt bother with the USA honestly. TV version US is much better than reality version (although Breaking Bad is pretty accurate and so is Ozark).

Id goto Aus. Brisbane, Singapore or well Toronto, CA rather.

For US its either Seattle or ideally North Carolina.
Currently I am thinking of going through one of the immigration agencies for the Canada route as an option (they charge around 50k for "all the help etc". Do you think they are worth the investment or should I just do my own research with the express entry applications. Also I am not aware of a route where you just apply for a residence permit for Australia? Could you elaborate more on that process if you don't mind.
 
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